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Magnets 3

This worksheet gives students a chance to stretch their understanding of how magnets work and the forces between them as well as looking at magnetic materials.

'Magnets 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Forces and Magnets

Curriculum subtopic:  Predicting Magnetism

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

When you are finding out about forces, magnets are often included because of the invisible force field around them which can affect other objects.

 

Remember, a force is usually seen as a push or a pull and it makes other objects move or stop moving or even change direction. Magnets can pull things towards them or push them away; they can also make them spin round.

In this worksheet you'll have a chance to try out your knowledge of magnets and then to use your powers of scientific deduction to find out what's going on.

Have fun!

When two magnets are pushed towards each other with their north poles facing, what will happen?

they will repel

they will attract

nothing will happen

When two magnets are pushed towards each other with one north pole facing a south pole, what will happen?

they will repel

they will attract

nothing will happen

When two magnets are REPELLING each other, what does that mean?

they push away from each other

they pull towards each other

they stay in the same place

When two magnets are ATTRACTING each other, what does that mean?

they push away from each other

they pull towards each other

they stay in the same place

Look at this picture of two magnets:

 

 

 

What will happen when they are pushed towards each other?

they will stay in the same place

they will push each other away

they will pull towards each other

Where is the pushing/pulling force strongest on a magnet?

in the middle of the magnet

at the ends of the magnet

it's the same right across the magnet

Helena is playing with two toy cars. She has fixed a magnet to the roof of each car. If she wants the cars to stick together, which of these three arrangements should she choose?

 

Arrangement 1

Arrangement 2

Arrangement 3

Helena finds it very hard to get the magnets to stay on the cars. She knows that the cars are made of steel and that steel is magnetic, so she tries her experiment without the magnets on the cars. What do you think will happen to the two cars without the magnets on top?

they will stick together

they will push each other away

they will stay in the same place

What happens when you put a magnetic material, like a steel pin, next to a magnet?

it is attracted to the magnet

it is attracted to one end of the magnet but repelled by the other end

nothing happens

Which of these explanations do you think best explains the difference between magnets and magnetic materials?

a magnetic material is not attracted to a magnet

a magnet attracts another magnet

only a magnet can repel another magnet

  • Question 1

When two magnets are pushed towards each other with their north poles facing, what will happen?

CORRECT ANSWER
they will repel
EDDIE SAYS
Remember: similar poles always REPEL each other (they push away from each other). Here it's N-N so they'll repel.
  • Question 2

When two magnets are pushed towards each other with one north pole facing a south pole, what will happen?

CORRECT ANSWER
they will attract
EDDIE SAYS
Remember: different poles always ATTRACT (stick together) so in this case the north pole will attract the south pole, meaning that they move together.
  • Question 3

When two magnets are REPELLING each other, what does that mean?

CORRECT ANSWER
they push away from each other
EDDIE SAYS
When magnets repel, their force fields collide which means that they push each other away. That happens when the poles are the same: N-N, S-S.
  • Question 4

When two magnets are ATTRACTING each other, what does that mean?

CORRECT ANSWER
they pull towards each other
EDDIE SAYS
When magnets attract their force fields join and they pull each other together. That happens when the poles are different: N-S, S-N.
  • Question 5

Look at this picture of two magnets:

 

 

 

What will happen when they are pushed towards each other?

CORRECT ANSWER
they will push each other away
EDDIE SAYS
As you can see the same poles are facing each other:N-N. That means that they will repel - push each other away.
  • Question 6

Where is the pushing/pulling force strongest on a magnet?

CORRECT ANSWER
at the ends of the magnet
EDDIE SAYS
The greatest magnetic force in a magnet is at either end - THE POLES. These are either North or South, even in a horseshoe magnet or a round magnet. So you will always be able to pick up more objects with the poles than the middle.
  • Question 7

Helena is playing with two toy cars. She has fixed a magnet to the roof of each car. If she wants the cars to stick together, which of these three arrangements should she choose?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Arrangement 2
EDDIE SAYS
Arrangements 1 and 3 have similar poles facing - that means that when Helena pushes the cars towards each other they will be repelled. In arrangement 2 there is a North and a South pole facing, so those cars will attract each other and stick together.
  • Question 8

Helena finds it very hard to get the magnets to stay on the cars. She knows that the cars are made of steel and that steel is magnetic, so she tries her experiment without the magnets on the cars. What do you think will happen to the two cars without the magnets on top?

CORRECT ANSWER
they will stay in the same place
EDDIE SAYS
Although steel is magnetic it isn't a magnet. So nothing will happen. Helena will need at least one magnet to get the force field she needs to make the cars move. Only magnets can attract objects made of steel.
  • Question 9

What happens when you put a magnetic material, like a steel pin, next to a magnet?

CORRECT ANSWER
it is attracted to the magnet
EDDIE SAYS
Both the north pole and the south pole of a magnet will attract magnetic materials, so that means that the steel pin will be attracted whichever end you use. ONLY two magnets can repel each other, and the steel pin isn't a magnet.
  • Question 10

Which of these explanations do you think best explains the difference between magnets and magnetic materials?

CORRECT ANSWER
only a magnet can repel another magnet
EDDIE SAYS
Magnetic materials (like iron, steel and nickel) are attracted to either pole of a magnet. Only magnets ever repel each other - when the same poles are facing (N-N, S-S).
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