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Electrical Circuits

In this worksheet, students will be exploring electrical circuits and their properties.

'Electrical Circuits' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:   Simple Circuits

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Don't we use so many things every day that rely on electricity to make them work?

 

Some things get their electricity by plugging them into the mains power supply and others get their electric power from batteries. But wherever the power comes from, electricity can only do its work if it is able to flow in a circuit.

 

A circuit can be as simple as a source of electricity (such as a battery) a light bulb and a switch. 

 Circuit of battery and 2 bulbs in series

 

Use this worksheet to test what you know about circuits and how electricity flows through them.

What is an electrical circuit?

 

Choose ONE answer.

the power lines that carry electricity to our homes

a company that provides us with electricity

a series of electric machines and switches

a path around which an electric current can flow

What do you call a material that allows an electric current to pass through it?

a driver

a conductor

a cable

a circuit

If you have a simple electrical circuit with a battery, a switch and a light bulb, what happens to the light bulb when you open the switch?

 

Light bulb

nothing happens

the bulb gets brighter

the bulb gets dimmer

the bulb goes out

Which of these materials would NOT be a good conductor in an electrical circuit?

copper

steel

plastic

gold

You have a circuit that consists of a bulb, a switch and a 1.5 volt battery.

 

If you add another 1.5 volt battery to the circuit, what do you think happens to the bulb?

it stays the same

it glows more dimly

it glows brighter

it goes out

You have a circuit consisting of a switch, a bulb and a 1.5 volt battery.

 

What happens if you add a second bulb next to the one already in the circuit?

the first bulb glows brightly and the second dimly

neither bulb glows

the first bulb glows but the second one doesn't glow at all

both bulbs glow with the same brightness

You have a circuit consisting of a bulb, a switch and 1.5 volt battery.

 

You add two more batteries and close the switch. The bulb glows for a second then goes out.

 

What do you think has happened? 

there must be a fault in one of the batteries

the third battery blocks the flow of current from the other two

the flow of electricity is too great and the bulb burns out

the extra current causes the switch to open

Here are four statements about the position of a switch in a simple circuit with two bulbs and a battery.

 

Which statement do you think is true?

if the switch is between the bulbs and the battery the bulbs will be dimmer

if the switch is between the two bulbs one will be dimmer than the other

if the switch is too close to the battery neither bulb will light

it makes no difference where the switch is

  • Question 1

What is an electrical circuit?

 

Choose ONE answer.

CORRECT ANSWER
a path around which an electric current can flow
EDDIE SAYS
An electric current has to follow an unbroken circuit. If there is a break anywhere in the circuit the current will stop flowing. The circuit may just be a wire that conducts the electricity, though we can add switches and electrical equipment if we want the electricity to do work.
  • Question 2

What do you call a material that allows an electric current to pass through it?

CORRECT ANSWER
a conductor
EDDIE SAYS
Conductors don't just stand in front of an orchestra! Electrical conductors allow electricity to flow through them - metals are good conductors. Cables may contain metal, but we don't know what sort of cable it is. Conductor is the answer.
  • Question 3

If you have a simple electrical circuit with a battery, a switch and a light bulb, what happens to the light bulb when you open the switch?

 

Light bulb

CORRECT ANSWER
the bulb goes out
EDDIE SAYS
When you open the switch this breaks the circuit so the current can no longer flow. Without a flow of current through it the bulb goes out.
  • Question 4

Which of these materials would NOT be a good conductor in an electrical circuit?

CORRECT ANSWER
plastic
EDDIE SAYS
Plastic does not conduct electricity so would be of no use in a circuit. The other three are metals, and metals are all good conductors of electricity.
  • Question 5

You have a circuit that consists of a bulb, a switch and a 1.5 volt battery.

 

If you add another 1.5 volt battery to the circuit, what do you think happens to the bulb?

CORRECT ANSWER
it glows brighter
EDDIE SAYS
Two batteries together provide a greater flow of electric current than one on its own, so the bulb glows more brightly.
  • Question 6

You have a circuit consisting of a switch, a bulb and a 1.5 volt battery.

 

What happens if you add a second bulb next to the one already in the circuit?

CORRECT ANSWER
both bulbs glow with the same brightness
EDDIE SAYS
Both bulbs glow with the same brightness because the electric current is the same at all points in the circuit. They are dimmer than before, because the electric current has to flow more slowly through two bulbs (you'll learn to say that they are 'in series'), but they are the same brightness as each other.
  • Question 7

You have a circuit consisting of a bulb, a switch and 1.5 volt battery.

 

You add two more batteries and close the switch. The bulb glows for a second then goes out.

 

What do you think has happened? 

CORRECT ANSWER
the flow of electricity is too great and the bulb burns out
EDDIE SAYS
Bulbs are designed to work best with a certain amount of current. Too much current causes the filament (the glowing part of the bulb) to burn out. With three batteries in the circuit, the current is too great for the bulb to cope with, so it "blows".
  • Question 8

Here are four statements about the position of a switch in a simple circuit with two bulbs and a battery.

 

Which statement do you think is true?

CORRECT ANSWER
it makes no difference where the switch is
EDDIE SAYS
As long as the circuit is complete it makes no difference which order the components come in. That might seem strange but as you go along you'll learn that in a series circuit the current is the same everywhere around the circuit, so the order of the components really doesn't matter. The more you test things like this, the better you'll come to understand it.
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