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Know Your Food Chains 1

In this worksheet, students will answer questions about how plants provide the basis for food chains in a variety of habitats.

'Know Your Food Chains 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Animals, including Humans

Curriculum subtopic:  Food Chains

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Plants are totally amazing!  Without plants, we would not have the variety of habitats which support animal life. As well as shelter and places to reproduce, plants grow the food which animals need:

Caterpillar eating apple

 

Animals which eat plants are, in turn, eaten by other meat-eating animals:

 

Bird feeding chicks

 

That's how food chains build up.  Food chains show how living things in different habitats depend on other living things for food.

A food chain can look like this:

 

grass   worm   skylark

 

 

So let's find out about how it all works.

In woodland, an oak tree provides food for an enormous variety of animals.

Oak tree

Match up the animal in the list with its favourite food from the oak tree:

Column A

Column B

beetle larvae
acorns
moth caterpillar
leaves
jay
wood and bark

Which THREE of these animals could be part of the woodland food chain which starts with the oak tree? 

tiger

blue tit

penguin

spider

hawk

Food chains start with a plant and end with the top predator – the animals which eat meat and don't get caught and killed themselves.

Put these organisms in the correct order in the woodland food chain.

 

1   2   3   4   5

Column A

Column B

1
spider
2
blue tit
3
hawk
4
beetle
5
acorn

Which THREE plants in this list are found in hedgerows?

blackberries (brambles)

palm trees

hawthorn

dandelions

cabbages

Identify the THREE animals which are part of a hedgerow food chain.

badger

slug

cat

vulture

hedgehog

Place these organisms in order in the hedgerow food chain.

Hedgehog

1   2   3   4

Column A

Column B

1
dandelion
2
hedgehog
3
badger
4
slug

Which living things start food chains in natural (and garden) ponds and streams. Choose TWO.

pond weed

diving beetles

microscopic algae

dragonfly

Have a think about times you've visited a pond and looked at what's living there.

 

Which FOUR of these organisms do you think are part of pond food chains? 

crocodiles

tadpoles

pondweed

pigeons

stickleback

heron

Here is the pond food chain. What is missing from the start of the food chain? Select an option from the list below.

 

Heron

 

_____   tadpole   dragonfly larva   _____   heron
water

pondweed

oxygen

In the pond food chain, choose which one of these animals eats the dragonfly larva and is, itself, eaten by the heron?

pond snail

stickleback

duck

  • Question 1

In woodland, an oak tree provides food for an enormous variety of animals.

Oak tree

Match up the animal in the list with its favourite food from the oak tree:

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

beetle larvae
wood and bark
moth caterpillar
leaves
jay
acorns
EDDIE SAYS
Some years ago a scientist decided to find out just how many animals depended on a single oak tree for food, shelter, etc.. Once her list had reached over 1000 different sorts of animals and there were clearly loads more to go, she gave up counting! The amount of food energy stored in all parts of an oak tree is clearly fed on by thousands of animals and here are just three: beetle larvae love wood and bark, jays eat acorns (and beetle larvae too!) while caterpillars are leaf-eaters. Isn't a tree marvellous?
  • Question 2

Which THREE of these animals could be part of the woodland food chain which starts with the oak tree? 

CORRECT ANSWER
blue tit
spider
hawk
EDDIE SAYS
Guess that didn't cause too many problems: tigers inhabit jungle habitats in Asia whilst penguins are, of course, Antarctic birds. Here, the food chain would start with the oak tree and the spider would be feeding on something like a caterpillar or flying insect. The blue tit eats the spider (yum!) and the hawk catches the blue tit. It's a tough world out there!
  • Question 3

Food chains start with a plant and end with the top predator – the animals which eat meat and don't get caught and killed themselves.

Put these organisms in the correct order in the woodland food chain.

 

1   2   3   4   5
CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

1
acorn
2
beetle
3
spider
4
blue tit
5
hawk
EDDIE SAYS
So, that's acorn → beetle → spider → blue tit → hawk. The stored food energy in the acorn (from the oak tree) feeds the beetle. That energy is then passed to the spider when it eats the beetle and in turn that passes to the blue tit and then the hawk. All starting from an oak tree. Brilliant!
  • Question 4

Which THREE plants in this list are found in hedgerows?

CORRECT ANSWER
blackberries (brambles)
hawthorn
dandelions
EDDIE SAYS
You know, hedgerows are very important habitats, providing a variety of food, shelter and places to reproduce for many insects, birds and mammals. Palm trees might grow in some gardens in the UK, but they're tropical plants really and cabbages are food crops that don't grow in hedges.
  • Question 5

Identify the THREE animals which are part of a hedgerow food chain.

CORRECT ANSWER
badger
slug
hedgehog
EDDIE SAYS
Remember that hedgerows provide a brilliant habitat for lots of animals? Slugs will be feeding on the plant material and both hedgehogs and badgers love munching on slugs (don't know what they see in them!). The cat might occasionally hunt in a hedgerow, but it's not a natural member of the habitat, and the vulture is a bird that soars high over plains in Africa, America and other places.
  • Question 6

Place these organisms in order in the hedgerow food chain.

Hedgehog

1   2   3   4
CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

1
dandelion
2
slug
3
hedgehog
4
badger
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, that's dandelion → slug → hedgehog → badger. Just to make sure: the dandelion makes the food by that amazing process using sunlight and then all the other animals feed on that food, passing it along. The slug gets it direct from the dandelion when it chews the leaves, the hedgehog eats the slug and if it's hungry enough the badger will eat the hedgehog (but it prefers worms and slugs, really!).
  • Question 7

Which living things start food chains in natural (and garden) ponds and streams. Choose TWO.

CORRECT ANSWER
pond weed
microscopic algae
EDDIE SAYS
Very tiny, microscopic plants (called algae), as well as pondweeds, like duckweed, support food chains in ponds and streams. Everything else feeds on that food they make, so the beetles and the dragonfly might not eat the plants directly, but they depend on the herbivores that eat the plants and get the food energy inside them.
  • Question 8

Have a think about times you've visited a pond and looked at what's living there.

 

Which FOUR of these organisms do you think are part of pond food chains? 

CORRECT ANSWER
tadpoles
pondweed
stickleback
heron
EDDIE SAYS
OK, so crocodiles live in water, but not in the UK and they are too big for ponds anyway. Pigeons might feed in the field near the pond, but they are not members of the pond habitat. Pondweed makes and stores energy from sunshine that all the rest of the pond inhabitants will be feeding on. Tadpoles munch that pondweed directly and they are often eaten by sticklebacks (small fish) which, in turn, are speared and caught by the resident heron.
  • Question 9

Here is the pond food chain. What is missing from the start of the food chain? Select an option from the list below.

 

Heron

 

_____   tadpole   dragonfly larva   _____   heron
CORRECT ANSWER
pondweed
EDDIE SAYS
Well, you knew that, didn't you? All food chains start with a plant!
  • Question 10

In the pond food chain, choose which one of these animals eats the dragonfly larva and is, itself, eaten by the heron?

CORRECT ANSWER
stickleback
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, the stickleback is a small fish that eats insect larvae (young) living in the pond. The heron stands quietly in the water, looking intently into the depths, and when it sees a fish ... it strikes!
---- OR ----

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