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Making Sounds 2

In this worksheet, students will answer questions about how sounds travel from their source.

'Making Sounds 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Sound

Curriculum subtopic:   How Sounds Travel

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Sounds - how are they made?

 

Sounds are produced by vibrating objects. The sound travels as a WAVE in a STRAIGHT PATH away from the source of the noise.

 

Plane

 

Sounds become softer, or fainter, the further away we are from the source. A good example is an aeroplane which is very loud when it is taking off at the airport, but can hardly be heard when it is flying high above our heads. 

 

Sound travels around corners by being REFLECTED from other surfaces.

 

OK, keep that in your head while we travel through some questions...

Motorbikes

 

These motorbikes produce the same engine sound, but which one will sound the LOUDEST to our ears?

the nearest one

the one furthest away

they will sound the same

Here are three statements about sound travelling.

 

Which statement best explains why sounds become softer the further away we are from them? 

objects further away look smaller

it's our ears playing tricks on us

the sound spreads out and has to cover a bigger area

Which materials vibrate to carry sound?

 

Only one is correct!

solids and gases

liquids and gases

solids and liquids

solids, liquids and gases

Complete this sentence.  Sound travels in...

CDs

waves

aeroplanes

We know that sound travels through different materials. Can you think why?

 

Match up the material with the evidence.

Column A

Column B

gas
a neighbours' loud TV when the doors and windows a...
solid
a clap of thunder
liquid
humpback whales singing to each other

In science, the SOURCE of a sound means... 

where the sound travels to

where the sound is made

tomato ketchup

Sound waves travel in a straight PATH away from the source.

 

Is this statement True or False?

True

False

Callum and Karen are using their knowledge of how sound travels.

 

Karen says: "Because sound travels in a straight path, it cannot go around corners."

Callum says: "I know sound can travel around corners because I can hear the school bell when I am on the climbing frame around the corner from the teacher."

 

 

Who do you think is correct?

Callum

Karen

Sound travels around corners by... 

bending

bouncing off objects

getting louder

The science word for 'bouncing' off objects is...

reflex

distraction

reflection

  • Question 1

Motorbikes

 

These motorbikes produce the same engine sound, but which one will sound the LOUDEST to our ears?

CORRECT ANSWER
the nearest one
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, the closer you are to the source of a sound, the shorter the distance it has to travel to your ears and so the louder it is (because less of it is lost into the air around you).
  • Question 2

Here are three statements about sound travelling.

 

Which statement best explains why sounds become softer the further away we are from them? 

CORRECT ANSWER
the sound spreads out and has to cover a bigger area
EDDIE SAYS
As sound travels away from an object, it spreads out in all directions and becomes softer because it has to cover a greater area and distance. The sound travels through air, like the ripples in a pond when you chuck a stone into the water - the further you are from a sound, the smaller those ripples are, so the softer the sound is.
  • Question 3

Which materials vibrate to carry sound?

 

Only one is correct!

CORRECT ANSWER
solids, liquids and gases
EDDIE SAYS
Was that a surprise? Any vibrating material can carry a sound. Solids, liquids and gases can all carry sounds because it's the vibrating of the particles they are made of that causes the sound to be carried along. Strangely, air is very bad at this - gases have big distances between their molecules, so it takes a while to transfer the sound along. Solids, like metals, and liquids, like water, carry sound much faster. Can you think why?
  • Question 4

Complete this sentence.  Sound travels in...

CORRECT ANSWER
waves
EDDIE SAYS
Vibrations travel through materials in waves, like ripples in a pond. CDs and aeroplanes are sources of sound, but don't carry sound themselves - the sound they make travels through the air.
  • Question 5

We know that sound travels through different materials. Can you think why?

 

Match up the material with the evidence.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

gas
a clap of thunder
solid
a neighbours' loud TV when the do...
liquid
humpback whales singing to each o...
EDDIE SAYS
Hmmm - work that one out? Do the easiest one first, on any question with choices: the thunder must come through the air, so that's gas. Where do humpback whales live? In the sea! So that's a liquid. (Never heard a whale's song - check it out online!). Finally, the neighbours' loud TV sound must travel through the walls - they are solid. To check that out, try tapping on the radiator in one part of your home/school and getting someone to see if they can hear that in a different room - the sound travels through the metal of the pipes very quickly.
  • Question 6

In science, the SOURCE of a sound means... 

CORRECT ANSWER
where the sound is made
EDDIE SAYS
It's like a river: its source up in the mountains is where it starts. The object making the sound, like you tapping your fingers on the table, is the source of the sound.
  • Question 7

Sound waves travel in a straight PATH away from the source.

 

Is this statement True or False?

CORRECT ANSWER
True
EDDIE SAYS
Sound waves travel in all directions away from their source in straight PATHS. Mind you, they spread out in all directions (remember the ripples idea?) but for each particle that carries the sound, the vibration is carried in a straight line along the path. Oo, science can be tricky!
  • Question 8

Callum and Karen are using their knowledge of how sound travels.

 

Karen says: "Because sound travels in a straight path, it cannot go around corners."

Callum says: "I know sound can travel around corners because I can hear the school bell when I am on the climbing frame around the corner from the teacher."

 

 

Who do you think is correct?

CORRECT ANSWER
Callum
EDDIE SAYS
Callum uses his observations to collect the evidence he needs to show that sound CAN go around corners, even though it always TRAVELS in a STRAIGHT PATH. So, how's that? What's the sound doing if it travels straight but can still go round corners? Needs some more thought.....
  • Question 9

Sound travels around corners by... 

CORRECT ANSWER
bouncing off objects
EDDIE SAYS
Sounds can bounce off surfaces. This is called REFLECTION. A sound which 'bounces back' to us is called an ECHO. There - that's what's going on. Think of it: loads and loads of sound waves, all whizzing out from the school bell. They'll travel along until they hit something (like a football hitting a wall). Then they bounce off, in lots of different directions. As long as your ear is lined up with one of those directions, you'll hear the sound. Keep thinking about it!
  • Question 10

The science word for 'bouncing' off objects is...

CORRECT ANSWER
reflection
EDDIE SAYS
That's right, reflection. Sounds, like light, are reflected by surfaces. Like a football hitting a wall, the sound waves bounce off and travel in a new direction.
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