The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

How does Blood Go Around our Bodies?

In this worksheet, students will consolidate their understanding of blood vessels in the body, their design and what they carry.

'How does Blood Go Around our Bodies?' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Animals, including Humans

Curriculum subtopic:   Human Circulatory System

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Think of your body like a school: everyone in the school needs food, water, electricity and so on. Then, everyone generates waste that needs to be taken away. Moving stuff into and out of the school requires a transport system - that's the equivalent of our blood. In the school, lorries and vans deliver all sorts of goods, the postman brings letters and parcels, and water and electricity are delivered through pipes and cables. Then, the rubbish goes out in waste vehicles, in drains and so on.

 

Delivery truck  Delivery man  Food waste

 

Your own body's circulation system is like this: it delivers food and oxygen, taking away the waste from respiration, like carbon dioxide and protein waste (called urea which goes to make the urine we excrete from the body).

 

You will already know quite a lot about it, so now's your chance to check that and perhaps extend your understanding a little further. Here goes...

OK, an easy one to start off with.

 

Which one of the following do you think best describes the job of the heart?

Pump

Battery

Valve

Blood source

The blood is moved around the body in tubes called blood vessels.

 

Name the blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart and around the body.

Arteries

Veins

Capillaries

Brachioles

Once the blood has delivered the goods, it needs to be returned to the heart.

 

Which blood vessels do this?

Arteries

Veins

Capillaries

Brachioles

Here's a basic diagram of our circulation (ignore the names of the blood vessels - just look at the basic design):

 

Blood circulation

 

You can see the blood carrying substances to be delivered coloured red.

The blood that's carrying waste to be removed is coloured blue.

 

Use the table below to match substances in the blood to the correct colour.

Column A

Column B

Red
Urea
Red
Carbon Dioxide
Blue
Sugar
Blue
Oxygen

For the blood to be able to deliver substances to individual body cells, the blood vessels need to be really tiny.

 

Capillaries

 

What are these tiny blood vessels called?

Arteries

Capillaries

Red blood cells

Tubules

Where in the body does the blood pick up oxygen in order to be able to deliver it around the body?

Cells

Brain

Lungs

Heart

Once it has delivered its oxygen it's referred to as deoxygenated blood.

 

Fill in the table to match the type of blood to the blood vessels in which it is normally found.

What is the name of the structures inside the heart (and the arteries too) which shut, in order to stop the blood flowing backwards when it's squeezed by the walls of the heart?

 

Type your answer into the box.

When the heart squeezes the blood, it sets up a wave of pressure which then travels throughout the body's arteries.

 

What do we usually call this regular pressure wave caused by the heart? Write one word in the box.

Thinking about this 'pressure wave', predict which blood vessels are designed with thicker walls.

 

Blood vessels

 

Match up the blood vessels with your prediction for the thickness of their walls.

Column A

Column B

Arteries
Thin walls
Veins
Thick walls
  • Question 1

OK, an easy one to start off with.

 

Which one of the following do you think best describes the job of the heart?

CORRECT ANSWER
Pump
EDDIE SAYS
So, the heart pumps the blood. It has valves in it, as part of its structure, to keep the blood moving forward. It pumps by squeezing the blood and the valves stop it going backwards. The heart isn't the source of the blood - much of it is made in the bone marrow.
  • Question 2

The blood is moved around the body in tubes called blood vessels.

 

Name the blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart and around the body.

CORRECT ANSWER
Arteries
EDDIE SAYS
The arteries are the big, muscular blood vessels that carry the freshly-pumped blood from the heart and deliver all sorts of substances to the cells of the body. Veins are the vessels that bring it to the heart, while capillaries are the tiny vessels that supply the various tissues and cells of the body. Brachioles, by the way, are tiny airways inside the lungs.
  • Question 3

Once the blood has delivered the goods, it needs to be returned to the heart.

 

Which blood vessels do this?

CORRECT ANSWER
Veins
EDDIE SAYS
The capillaries join together to pass the blood to the veins which track back towards the heart so that the blood gains another 'push' to send it off, around the body again.
  • Question 4

Here's a basic diagram of our circulation (ignore the names of the blood vessels - just look at the basic design):

 

Blood circulation

 

You can see the blood carrying substances to be delivered coloured red.

The blood that's carrying waste to be removed is coloured blue.

 

Use the table below to match substances in the blood to the correct colour.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Red
Sugar
Red
Oxygen
Blue
Carbon Dioxide
Blue
Urea
EDDIE SAYS
If you use the information above, you'll see that blood coloured red is delivering goods - so that's sugar and oxygen delivered to the organs and tissues of the body so that they can get the energy they need to do their jobs. Then, the waste carbon dioxide and urea (remember the protein waste, from the introduction, that later becomes urine?) are put back into the blood to be removed - that's the blue-coloured blood in the diagram. Does that all make sense? Great, let's continue.
  • Question 5

For the blood to be able to deliver substances to individual body cells, the blood vessels need to be really tiny.

 

Capillaries

 

What are these tiny blood vessels called?

CORRECT ANSWER
Capillaries
EDDIE SAYS
Capillaries are those tiny, tiny blood vessels that do the actual delivering to cells - they're so small that you could fit 10 inside one of your strands of hair and there are so many that, joined together, the capillaries inside your body stretch out .... wait for it ... about 2500km! Amazing! The red blood cells can only fit down one at a time (they carry the oxygen) and the word 'tubule' simply means a thin tube.
  • Question 6

Where in the body does the blood pick up oxygen in order to be able to deliver it around the body?

CORRECT ANSWER
Lungs
EDDIE SAYS
The lungs are our organs that extract oxygen from the air - you'll learn loads about their internal structure later in your science course. It's here that oxygen is picked up by the red blood cells to be delivered all over the body, including to the brain and the heart.
  • Question 7

Once it has delivered its oxygen it's referred to as deoxygenated blood.

 

Fill in the table to match the type of blood to the blood vessels in which it is normally found.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
If you take it that blood flowing away from the heart is in arteries, you're spot on. This means that, in general, blood in the arteries is oxygenated blood that's supplying the body. The only exception is the artery between the heart and the lungs, where it's going to collect the oxygen - after that, all the arteries carry oxygenated blood. The veins bring deoxygenated blood back to the heart to be pumped to the lungs to collect more oxygen, and then off around the body again. That's circulation for you!
  • Question 8

What is the name of the structures inside the heart (and the arteries too) which shut, in order to stop the blood flowing backwards when it's squeezed by the walls of the heart?

 

Type your answer into the box.

CORRECT ANSWER
valve
valves
EDDIE SAYS
Think of valves like a one-way door with the word "push" on it - the blood is forced through the door, but when enough has got past it, the pressure pushes the door (valve) shut and it only opens one way. That way the blood circulation has a direction, which is really important. In the olden days, people believed that our blood moved up and down our bodies like the tides of the sea. Then, around 1600, a doctor called William Harvey discovered the valves in our arteries, which proved that blood must be going in a particular direction - he called it "circulation".
  • Question 9

When the heart squeezes the blood, it sets up a wave of pressure which then travels throughout the body's arteries.

 

What do we usually call this regular pressure wave caused by the heart? Write one word in the box.

CORRECT ANSWER
pulse
EDDIE SAYS
If you can feel your pulse at your wrist or in your neck, you are feeling the waves of pressure coming from the heart. The heart pumps (squeezes) the blood in order to give it enough oomph to push it around the body; that's the pressure wave and you can feel it as your pulse. This then means you are feeling the blood in your arteries as that pulse is too weak to feel in your veins as the blood travels back to the heart.
  • Question 10

Thinking about this 'pressure wave', predict which blood vessels are designed with thicker walls.

 

Blood vessels

 

Match up the blood vessels with your prediction for the thickness of their walls.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Arteries
Thick walls
Veins
Thin walls
EDDIE SAYS
If you think about it, the push from the strong heart means that arteries are going to have to have thick walls in order to withstand the pressure from the pump. Once through the capillaries and into the veins, the blood no longer has much pressure, so veins have much thinner walls. Don't worry if you didn't know this - this question was all about thinking and predicting. Great focus!
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.