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Science SATs Practice: Biology Level 3

In this worksheet, students will be able to complete a full SATs-style practice paper, timed to 30 minutes, to help them assess how prepared they are for the SATs sampling tests.

'Science SATs Practice: Biology Level 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   SATs Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:   Biology Practice Papers

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a practice science (Biology) test in the style of a Key Stage 2 National Test.


 

In the real Key Stage 2 National Test, you will write your answers in a special test booklet, in spaces provided.


 

At EdPlace you will use the computer to enter your answers and you can use a pencil and paper to make jottings if needed.


 

This paper includes a variety of biology based questions from the Key Stage 2 programme of study.


 

For each question, you will be given instructions about how to answer. 

Some questions may need an answer to be typed.

Others may need you to match words or phrases, select text or choose correct answers.


 

There are 22 questions in the test. 

The test is timed and the timer is set for 30 minutes.

You should aim for just over 1 minute per question.


 

Don't worry if you don't finish in this time, you can carry on working after the timer has run out. 

All questions are worth 1 mark.

All questions are automatically marked.


 

You may find some of the questions difficult.

If you are struggling to answer a question, do not waste time on it, but move onto the next question.


 

Disclaimer:

We have no affiliation to the Standards and Testing Agency (STA) and these questions represent our own unique content developed by EdPlace Key Stage 2 Science authors.

None of the content displayed here has been supplied by the STA or any other third party suppliers.

The range of foods that we eat is known as our ...

Food

Selection

Diet

Meal

Foods contain certain nutrients that are important to our bodies.

 

For example, we need protein for ...

Growing

Energy

Good eyesight

Intelligence

Some foods provide more of certain nutrients than others.

 

Match each nutrient with a food that is high in that nutrient.

Column A

Column B

Carbohydrates
Chicken
Fats
White bread
Proteins
Beefsteak
Fibre
Butter
Vitamin C
Grapefruit
Iron
Baked beans

Harvey's typical day's food looks like this:

 

- Breakfast - nothing.

- Elevenses - two chocolate bars.

- Lunch - burger, chips, doughnut, coca-cola.

- Tea - cake and cup of tea.

- Supper - spaghetti bolognese, ice cream, coca-cola.

 

Use the chart to show which nutrients Harvey has too much of and which ones he is lacking in his daily diet.

 Too much in his dietNot enough in his diet
Sugar
Fat
Protein
Fibre
Vitamins & Minerals

Harvey will feel better and more ready to work if he has something for breakfast.

 

Rank the following three breakfasts in order of the range of nutrients they give him to start his day well.

 

(Use 1 for the best breakfast down to 3 for the least good breakfast for Harvey).

Column A

Column B

Bacon, egg, sausage, tomato, fried bread, baked be...
1
Weetabix, milk, orange juice
3
Muesli, milk, banana, orange juice
2

Which plant organ is designed for reproducing that species of plant?

Roots

Leaves

Flowers

Buds

Pollen is often transferred between plants by insects, like bees, or the wind.

 

Complete this chart to show the different features of insect- and wind-pollinated flowers:

 Insect-pollinated flowerWind-pollinated flower
Colourful petals
Nice scent
Lots of light pollen
Nectar provided
Dangly stamens

Here are three words:

 

Pollen

Seed

Ovule

 

Put each one in the correct place in this sentence:

 Insect-pollinated flowerWind-pollinated flower
Colourful petals
Nice scent
Lots of light pollen
Nectar provided
Dangly stamens

In order for seeds to be spread away from the parent plant, and grow in new places, they have to be dispersed.

 

Different fruits, containing the seeds, are adapted to use different methods to disperse themselves.

 

Use the chart to match the seed with its method of dispersal.

Column A

Column B

Sycamore
Explosion
Goosegrass ("sticky willy")
Wind
Gorse
Animals (eating)
Cherry
Animals (fur)

Arthur and Isla have been investigating the conditions needed for seeds to germinate.  They made a record of what they had found out:

 

 

-  "seeds on damp kitchen towel germinated but the ones on dry kitchen towel didn't"

-  "seeds on the windowsill germinated and grew green leaves.  The seeds in the cupboard germinated and grew yellow leaves."

 

 

Use the evidence from Arthur and Isla's investigation to fill in the chart:

 Needed for germinationNot needed for germinationNo evidence
Light
Air
Water
Warmth

Lungs

 

The lungs are the organs which are in charge of swapping gases we need for ones we need to get rid of.

 

Match the gas with its correct partner.

Column A

Column B

Oxygen
Absorbed into the blood in the lungs
Nitrogen
Removed from the blood in the lungs
Carbon Dioxide (

CO2)

Not needed by the blood

The heart is a muscle which pumps blood around the body.

 

Have a look at this very basic diagram of our circulation (arrows showing direction of flow) and decide which letter represents which blood vessels.

 

Circulation basics

 ABC
Arteries
Veins
Capillaries

Jessica was excited to discover that she could feel the pumping of her heart when she placed her fingers on her wrist or at the side of her neck.

 

PUlse

 

Jessica was able to feel her...

Which of the following do you think our blood system is most closely related to?

Transport

Delivery

Electricity

Cleaning

Chips

 

When you eat a plate of potato chips, what is the main nutrient you are gaining from the food?

Fat

Protein

Carbohydrate

Vitamin A

When your digestive system breaks the chips into their constituent chemicals, the blood shares them around the body.

 

Complete this matching chart to show the path the chips take to reach your brain:

Column A

Column B

Chips mashed up
Small intestine
Chips digested
Brain
Chip nutrients absorbed into the blood
Stomach
Chip nutrients delivered
Mouth

Mrs Bates's science class have been investigating the community of plants and animals living in a wood near their school.

 

As part of their investigation, they compared the numbers of different species of plants in three areas of the wood.  They also measured the height of nettles in those areas as well as the brightness of the light.

 

They filled in their data in a chart:

 

 

Woodland Area No. of different types of plant/m2 Height of nettles/cm Brightness of light
By stream 12 58 High
By path 5 None Medium
By oak tree 2 32 Low

 

 

Several different environmental factors (variables) will affect how many different types (species) of plants live in each area of the wood.

 

One is the brightness of the light.  Try to name two more (using only single words for your answers).

Column A

Column B

Chips mashed up
Small intestine
Chips digested
Brain
Chip nutrients absorbed into the blood
Stomach
Chip nutrients delivered
Mouth

The nettles are at two different heights in the two areas in which they are measured.

 

This could be as a result of environmental factors such as light, or it could be caused by the fact that they're different species of nettle (with different genes and inherited differences).

 

Apart from height, name ONE other visible difference that you think inherited genes may cause in nettles.

The class set a number of PITFALL TRAPS in the wood by sinking yogurt pots into the soil so that animals moving on the soil surface might fall in.

 

Various animals were found in the traps the following day.  The students tried to sort their finds into animal groups.

 

Can you help them?

 WormsMolluscsArthropods (insects)Arthropods (others)
Spiders
Beetles
Woodlice
Snails
Earthworms
Millipedes
Slugs

All the animals they caught in their pitfalls traps were invertebrates.

 

This means that none of them have a ...

Skeleton

Shell

Legs

Backbone

Here is a possible food chain for some of the inhabitants of the wood:

 

#8742 q21

 

The nettle provides the energy for the food chain so it is known as the ...

Predator

First Consumer

Producer

Prey

Here is a possible food web for some of the inhabitants of the wood:

 

#8742 q22

 

From this list of animals that the students caught in their pitfall traps, choose one that might fill the gap in the food web.

Spider

Beetle

Snail

Slug

Millipede

Earthworm

  • Question 1

The range of foods that we eat is known as our ...

CORRECT ANSWER
Diet
EDDIE SAYS
Diet is one of those over-used and abused words in our modern world. In basic scientific terms, it simply means what we eat. For example, Spanish people eat a Mediterranean diet with lots of vegetables, oils and seafood. Our Western diet is heavy on dairy products and meat. Being "on a diet" means that you're watching what you eat and consuming less of certain foods and more of others in order to maintain a correct weight.
  • Question 2

Foods contain certain nutrients that are important to our bodies.

 

For example, we need protein for ...

CORRECT ANSWER
Growing
EDDIE SAYS
It's important to know what foods contain high amounts of particular nutrients and why those nutrients are important to your body. Remember, this is life-learning, not simply about doing well in exams! Your body is largely made of protein, so knowing good sources of protein is vital for your growth, as well as repairing your body when it gets damaged. By the way, energy mainly comes from carbohydrates and there's no food to make you more intelligent!
  • Question 3

Some foods provide more of certain nutrients than others.

 

Match each nutrient with a food that is high in that nutrient.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Carbohydrates
White bread
Fats
Butter
Proteins
Chicken
Fibre
Baked beans
Vitamin C
Grapefruit
Iron
Beefsteak
EDDIE SAYS
Now, this needs a bit of thought. One of the problems you face is that some foods could match with more than one nutrient. So, do the more specific ones first, for example grapefruit (a citrus fruit) with vitamin C. Do you know why fibre is important in your diet? If not, go and find out!
  • Question 4

Harvey's typical day's food looks like this:

 

- Breakfast - nothing.

- Elevenses - two chocolate bars.

- Lunch - burger, chips, doughnut, coca-cola.

- Tea - cake and cup of tea.

- Supper - spaghetti bolognese, ice cream, coca-cola.

 

Use the chart to show which nutrients Harvey has too much of and which ones he is lacking in his daily diet.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Too much in his dietNot enough in his diet
Sugar
Fat
Protein
Fibre
Vitamins & Minerals
EDDIE SAYS
LIfe's tough! Some of those foods are yummy! Trouble is, having too much too often actually damages Harvey's body. He's eating way too much sugar and fat (chocolate/coca-cola/ice cream, etc.). Then again, the protein he needs to grow, the fibre and vitamins/minerals he needs in order to be healthy are sorely lacking. Harvey needs a better diet!
  • Question 5

Harvey will feel better and more ready to work if he has something for breakfast.

 

Rank the following three breakfasts in order of the range of nutrients they give him to start his day well.

 

(Use 1 for the best breakfast down to 3 for the least good breakfast for Harvey).

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Bacon, egg, sausage, tomato, frie...
3
Weetabix, milk, orange juice
2
Muesli, milk, banana, orange juic...
1
EDDIE SAYS
What Harvey needs is an energy-packed start to his day with a good sprinkling of vitamins and minerals. With lots of fruit, muesli and milk he's getting the energy-hit he needs but without loads of sugar which he'll have to burn off (otherwise, it just turns to fat in his body). The fry-up is great once in a while but it's too loaded with fat and doesn't have much in the way of vitamins and minerals. Variety is the spice of life!
  • Question 6

Which plant organ is designed for reproducing that species of plant?

CORRECT ANSWER
Flowers
EDDIE SAYS
Roots are for anchoring/water and leaves are the plant's food factories. Buds could mean leaf bud or flower buds, but clearly the best option is 'flowers'. A plant's flowers contain stamens to release pollen and an ovary containing an egg that will be fertilized by the pollen. That's where the seed will form. It's funny to think of a plant having organs, but they do!
  • Question 7

Pollen is often transferred between plants by insects, like bees, or the wind.

 

Complete this chart to show the different features of insect- and wind-pollinated flowers:

CORRECT ANSWER
 Insect-pollinated flowerWind-pollinated flower
Colourful petals
Nice scent
Lots of light pollen
Nectar provided
Dangly stamens
EDDIE SAYS
Do you know your flowers all right? These sorts of questions help you to assess where you are. For a flower to attract an insect to do the job of pollination it has to provide a reward - sweet, sticky nectar! Then they have to advertise where the nectar is by using brightly coloured petals and a nice scent. If plants use the wind the transfer pollen, they cannot attract the wind towards them by using things like colour or smell. They need to make sure that every breath of wind carries pollen away, so they make masses and masses of tiny, light pollen grains that float on the air. They are released from loose, dangly stamens (like lamb's tails!) so that each breeze shakes pollen out of them. Designed by nature!
  • Question 8

Here are three words:

 

Pollen

Seed

Ovule

 

Put each one in the correct place in this sentence:

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
How did you get on with that? If you're not 100% sure, do the one you're most sure about first. Then you've a 50/50 chance of getting the next one correct! As you do more of this in KS3, it'll become clearer to you.
  • Question 9

In order for seeds to be spread away from the parent plant, and grow in new places, they have to be dispersed.

 

Different fruits, containing the seeds, are adapted to use different methods to disperse themselves.

 

Use the chart to match the seed with its method of dispersal.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Sycamore
Wind
Goosegrass ("sticky willy")
Animals (fur)
Gorse
Explosion
Cherry
Animals (eating)
EDDIE SAYS
Plants are amazing at how they are designed for where they are. So, sycamore seeds are those ones with wings that whirl round and round (while they're being blown along by the wind!). Cherries are eaten by birds and animals and either the stone (containing the seed) is left behind or it comes out in the animals' droppings. Goosegrass is often called sticky-willy and its fruits stick to your socks or your dog's fur - very effective! Gorse is that prickly bush with yellow flowers. Its seeds are contained in pods which explode, shooting the seeds out. So many ways of making sure that the seeds (and so the plants) are spread far and wide!
  • Question 10

Arthur and Isla have been investigating the conditions needed for seeds to germinate.  They made a record of what they had found out:

 

 

-  "seeds on damp kitchen towel germinated but the ones on dry kitchen towel didn't"

-  "seeds on the windowsill germinated and grew green leaves.  The seeds in the cupboard germinated and grew yellow leaves."

 

 

Use the evidence from Arthur and Isla's investigation to fill in the chart:

CORRECT ANSWER
 Needed for germinationNot needed for germinationNo evidence
Light
Air
Water
Warmth
EDDIE SAYS
Guess there was quite a bit of checking back with the results then? That's the way to do it! Their first experiment showed that without water, the seeds won't germinate. Their second experiment showed that light wasn't needed for germination: seeds in the light and seeds in the dark both germinated. They grew differently afterwards, but that's not in this question (important, that!). Their investigation provided no information about the need for air or warmth as these variables weren't taken away to check the effect on the seeds.
  • Question 11

Lungs

 

The lungs are the organs which are in charge of swapping gases we need for ones we need to get rid of.

 

Match the gas with its correct partner.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Oxygen
Absorbed into the blood in the lu...
Nitrogen
Not needed by the blood
Carbon Dioxide (

CO2...

Removed from the blood in the lun...
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully, that was reasonably straightforward. Our bodies need oxygen, so it's extracted from the air in the lungs and passes into the blood. Meanwhile, the

CO2 created within the body when we extract the energy from our food - that passes from the blood into the air in the lungs to be breathed out. Nitrogen is not a gas we need in our blood (although it makes up nearly 80% of the air we breathe in!).

  • Question 12

The heart is a muscle which pumps blood around the body.

 

Have a look at this very basic diagram of our circulation (arrows showing direction of flow) and decide which letter represents which blood vessels.

 

Circulation basics

CORRECT ANSWER
 ABC
Arteries
Veins
Capillaries
EDDIE SAYS
It's all about knowing the direction of the blood flow! The heart pumps the blood into ARTERIES, so that's C in the diagram. The arteries split into small CAPILLARIES (B) to supply each organ. The blood, having delivered oxygen and picked up

CO2, now returns to the heart in VEINS (A) to be sent off to the lungs/body again. If this is a problem area for you, don't worry. Just grab a fun KS2 revision book or check out a good kids' circulation site and get it nailed. This is stuff about YOU that YOU need to know!

  • Question 13

Jessica was excited to discover that she could feel the pumping of her heart when she placed her fingers on her wrist or at the side of her neck.

 

PUlse

 

Jessica was able to feel her...

CORRECT ANSWER
pulse
heart beat
heartbeat
EDDIE SAYS
The pulse is the wave of pressure reaching the far reaches of the body. When the heart pumps, it squeezes the blood and sends it out into the arteries under considerable pressure. It's this pressure wave that Jessica can feel when she checks her pulse.
  • Question 14

Which of the following do you think our blood system is most closely related to?

CORRECT ANSWER
Transport
EDDIE SAYS
Does that make sense to you? If you think of blood vessels as roads (motorways, main roads, streets, etc.) then stuff travels along in the blood just as it does along roads. Roads are used to deliver what we need and take away what we've finished with. That's why our circulation system is like a transport system, delivering and removing. If you chose 'electricity', then you'll learn that's our nerve network, while 'cleaning' is our kidneys. Great stuff!
  • Question 15

Chips

 

When you eat a plate of potato chips, what is the main nutrient you are gaining from the food?

CORRECT ANSWER
Carbohydrate
EDDIE SAYS
Potatoes are high in starch. That's a carbohydrate (like sugars). Important for our everyday energy. They're cooked in fat/oil, but they are mainly carbohydrate.
  • Question 16

When your digestive system breaks the chips into their constituent chemicals, the blood shares them around the body.

 

Complete this matching chart to show the path the chips take to reach your brain:

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Chips mashed up
Mouth
Chips digested
Stomach
Chip nutrients absorbed into the ...
Small intestine
Chip nutrients delivered
Brain
EDDIE SAYS
Knowing the order in which all this happens is really important to you. It's all about how you operate as a human being! Your brain needs energy to do all that thinking and co-ordination. Trouble is, the energy is in the form of chips and you cannot simply stick a chip into your brain and think, "That'll do"! The chip has to be converted into a soluble form and THEN transported to the brain. So, the teeth mash it up into smaller particles, the stomach adds acids and other chemicals to digest (break down) the chip. Then, in the small intestine, the carbohydrates that were in the potato can be put into the blood which then whizzes them off to the brain. And all without you having to give any instructions at all!
  • Question 17

Mrs Bates's science class have been investigating the community of plants and animals living in a wood near their school.

 

As part of their investigation, they compared the numbers of different species of plants in three areas of the wood.  They also measured the height of nettles in those areas as well as the brightness of the light.

 

They filled in their data in a chart:

 

 

Woodland Area No. of different types of plant/m2 Height of nettles/cm Brightness of light
By stream 12 58 High
By path 5 None Medium
By oak tree 2 32 Low

 

 

Several different environmental factors (variables) will affect how many different types (species) of plants live in each area of the wood.

 

One is the brightness of the light.  Try to name two more (using only single words for your answers).

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
There are so many to choose from! So many different factors can affect the number of different species of plant in an area of a wood, such as light, rainfall, grazing, trampling, competition, soil, temperature, etc. etc.. Hope you got that and managed to choose something from the list. One of the problems with questions like this is trying to cover every possible correct answer you can come up with, so sorry if you missed out!
  • Question 18

The nettles are at two different heights in the two areas in which they are measured.

 

This could be as a result of environmental factors such as light, or it could be caused by the fact that they're different species of nettle (with different genes and inherited differences).

 

Apart from height, name ONE other visible difference that you think inherited genes may cause in nettles.

CORRECT ANSWER
colour
leaf size
leaf shape
shape of leaf
size of leaf
size of stem
EDDIE SAYS
This is going to be hard - and hard to guess what you're likely to choose! Genes have a profound effect on how all individuals develop. With nettles, apart from height, it can cause differences in colour, in leaf size and shape, in the thickness of the stem. So many things. If you put something valid that's not on the list - give yourself a pat on the back!
  • Question 19

The class set a number of PITFALL TRAPS in the wood by sinking yogurt pots into the soil so that animals moving on the soil surface might fall in.

 

Various animals were found in the traps the following day.  The students tried to sort their finds into animal groups.

 

Can you help them?

CORRECT ANSWER
 WormsMolluscsArthropods (insects)Arthropods (others)
Spiders
Beetles
Woodlice
Snails
Earthworms
Millipedes
Slugs
EDDIE SAYS
Did you find that tricky or easy? Sorting organisms into their correct group is an important skill. Sorting is something we do quite naturally. So, the animals with hard exoskeletons and legs are arthropods and if it has 6 legs it's the insect sort. On the other hand, animals with a large slimy foot are called molluscs (although most of their cousins live in the sea, like oysters and squid). So, what's next?
  • Question 20

All the animals they caught in their pitfalls traps were invertebrates.

 

This means that none of them have a ...

CORRECT ANSWER
Backbone
EDDIE SAYS
The bones in your backbone are called VERTEBRAE. That means that you are a VERTEBRATE. None of the animals the students caught in their pitfall traps had a backbone - they were all INVERTEBRATES. That means they have to support their bodies in other ways. The arthropods have a hard exoskeleton to do that while molluscs often use a shell (remember, animals like oysters and whelks are molluscs that live in the sea, as most of the group do).
  • Question 21

Here is a possible food chain for some of the inhabitants of the wood:

 

#8742 q21

 

The nettle provides the energy for the food chain so it is known as the ...

CORRECT ANSWER
Producer
EDDIE SAYS
Hope you've got this by now! Without food energy, there's no food chain. Something has to 'produce' the energy. The plants do. How? Well, you'll find out in more detail in KS3, but basically plants take in simple chemicals and use sunlight energy to turn them into sugar. Amazing stuff!
  • Question 22

Here is a possible food web for some of the inhabitants of the wood:

 

#8742 q22

 

From this list of animals that the students caught in their pitfall traps, choose one that might fill the gap in the food web.

CORRECT ANSWER
Spider
EDDIE SAYS
Gosh, a tricky one to finish with. The answer's a spider. Why? Well, spiders are carnivores (eating woodlice) and small enough to be snapped up by a robin. 'Beetle' cannot be right as robins are already shown as eating them, and all the rest are herbivores and so wouldn't feed on woodlice. Phew! Done. Hope you enjoyed that and did OK.
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