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Fitness and Energy

In this worksheet, students will explain what it means to be fit and look at energy requirements of different people.

'Fitness and Energy' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Biology: Structure and Function of Living Organisms

Curriculum subtopic:  Nutrition and Digestion

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What does it mean to be fit and healthy?

 

 

Body shape

 


We can often tell, just by looking at a person, whether they have a healthy diet. But can we do that for everyone? A healthy diet for one person may not be a healthy diet for another, as everyone is different. Different people may need to exercise more or less than others as well as eat different amounts of food. 

 

See if you can say how much the following people need to exercise and eat to do what they do:

 

SchoolchildrenRowersOffice workerPregnant mum


 

So, what is right for you?

 

It is important to know how to maintain a fit and healthy lifestyle. Fitness can be split into five categories. The Five S's of Fitness are:

 

  • Strength
  • Stamina
  • Suppleness
  • Speed
  • Stability
     


Measuring fitness

 

All of the above aspects of fitness include your heart, lungs and muscles. It is, therefore, important to know how to keep each of these healthy.

 
 
Healthy heart and lungs

 

A healthy heart and lungs are essential when it comes to maintaining fitness. A simple way to check your heart and lung health is running on the spot, or steps, for 30 seconds and monitoring the return of pulse and breathing rates to resting level.

 

Woman checking pulse

 

Everybody's recovery is different; athletes will return to their resting heart rate in just a few minutes, while people who haven't exercised in a long time might take two or three times longer. The faster the heart rate drops after you stop exercising, the healthier your heart is.


 

Energy Requirements

 

Everybody needs a certain amount of energy all the time simply to maintain their normal body functions like beating heart, breathing, maintaining a constant 37oC - this is known as your basic metabolic rate.  The amount each of us requires is based on our body mass and our activity (how hard our bodies are working).  Each kg of our mass needs 5.47KJ/hr.  So, every day, we need the following amount of energy from our food just to maintain our metabolic rate:

 

5.47 x body mass x 24hr

 

So, for a 40kg boy, he needs a basic: 5.47 x 40 x 24 = 5 251KJ/day.  How will that change with weight and activity?  What if he's heavier than 40kg?  What if he's playing tennis?

 

We will explore some of these areas in this activity.

 

Out of the following people, who would require the most energy?

a rower

a child

an office worker

an elderly person

Fill in the blank space in the following statement and write the missing word in the answer box below.  

 

The Five S's of fitness are:

  • Strength
  • Suppleness
  • Speed
  • Stability 
  •  ______ ?

Which of the following are involved in all aspects of fitness?

heart

small intestine

stomach

lungs

muscles

bowel

Is the following statement true or false?

 

The faster your heart rate drops after exercise the healthier your heart is.  

true

false

Your body requires a steady supply of energy just to do its basic set of operations.  In order to calculate this basic energy requirement in a day, we know that each kg of body mass needs a certain amount of energy.

 

What is the number of KJ of energy needed by each of your kg?

4.2

4.75

5.47

7.54

Remembering that that is the calculation of your energy requirement for your basic metabolic rate, choose TWO major factors from the list that will increase the energy requirement of your body.

weight

temperature

season

activity

where you live

Here are the basic energy requirements for an average 25 year old man and woman:

 

Man = 10 500KJ

 

Woman = 8000KJ

 

Use those figures to estimate whether the following people need more or less energy.  Match the energy amount with the correct person.

Column A

Column B

Boy, 2 years old
15 000KJ
Girl, 13 years old
9500KJ
Woman, 25 years old
10 500KJ
Man, 25 years old
8000KJ
Pregnant woman, 25 years old
8500KJ
Male coalminer, 30 years old
5000KJ

Finn has a basic energy requirement of 5200KJ/day.  He's a keen cyclist and spends 2 hours a day on his bike at the weekend.

 

Cyclist

 

When cycling, he uses an extra 2500KJ/hr.

 

What is his total energy requirement on one of his cycling days?

Column A

Column B

Boy, 2 years old
15 000KJ
Girl, 13 years old
9500KJ
Woman, 25 years old
10 500KJ
Man, 25 years old
8000KJ
Pregnant woman, 25 years old
8500KJ
Male coalminer, 30 years old
5000KJ

Look at these three facts:

 

100g peanuts contains 2600KJ of energy.

 

Andrea needs 2100KJ/day of energy as her basic requirement.

 

She likes playing badminton.  This exercise means that Andrea needs an extra 1800KJ/hour.

 

If she was ONLY eating peanuts to fulfill her day's energy requirements (not a great idea!), what weight of peanuts would she have to eat to supply all her energy needs for a day in which she plays 1 hour of badminton?

 

Clue (only if you need it!): work out her total energy need first.

Column A

Column B

Boy, 2 years old
15 000KJ
Girl, 13 years old
9500KJ
Woman, 25 years old
10 500KJ
Man, 25 years old
8000KJ
Pregnant woman, 25 years old
8500KJ
Male coalminer, 30 years old
5000KJ

When Jim is sitting down, he uses an extra 6KJ/min of energy in addition to his daily energy requirement.

 

When Jim is going upstairs he uses an extra 36KJ/min in addition to his daily energy requirement.

 

If Jim spends a total of 10 minutes in the day going upstairs, how much time (in minutes) spent sitting down would use up the same amount of energy?

 

Just write the NUMBER of minutes in the text box.

  • Question 1

Out of the following people, who would require the most energy?

CORRECT ANSWER
a rower
EDDIE SAYS
Rowing is a very strenuous sport which requires a lot of energy to power the necessary muscles. So, in order to supply the necessary energy to power those muscles, the energy requirement for the day has increased.
  • Question 2

Fill in the blank space in the following statement and write the missing word in the answer box below.  

 

The Five S's of fitness are:

  • Strength
  • Suppleness
  • Speed
  • Stability 
  •  ______ ?
CORRECT ANSWER
stamina
EDDIE SAYS
Stamina is your ability to "keep going". If you're not much of a runner, for example, you may feel "puffed out" by going upstairs. That means that you have a low stamina. Someone who can swim length after length of the swimming pool will have a high stamina - they can "keep going".
  • Question 3

Which of the following are involved in all aspects of fitness?

CORRECT ANSWER
heart
lungs
muscles
EDDIE SAYS
The organs affected by every aspect of fitness are the heart, lungs and muscles. Whatever sort of work your body is doing requires energy to be released in the tissue of the muscles. That respiration uses the energy stores in the muscle cells which requires oxygen from the lungs brought by the blood.
  • Question 4

Is the following statement true or false?

 

The faster your heart rate drops after exercise the healthier your heart is.  

CORRECT ANSWER
true
EDDIE SAYS
The statement is true: the faster your heart returns to it's normal rate after it has been beating faster during exercise, the healthier it is. It's worth remembering this and factoring it into your fitness regime.
  • Question 5

Your body requires a steady supply of energy just to do its basic set of operations.  In order to calculate this basic energy requirement in a day, we know that each kg of body mass needs a certain amount of energy.

 

What is the number of KJ of energy needed by each of your kg?

CORRECT ANSWER
5.47
EDDIE SAYS
For each kg of your body mass you're going to need 5.47KJ of energy every hour. To find the daily need you simply multiply that by 24.
  • Question 6

Remembering that that is the calculation of your energy requirement for your basic metabolic rate, choose TWO major factors from the list that will increase the energy requirement of your body.

CORRECT ANSWER
weight
activity
EDDIE SAYS
To be honest, all of the above will have some impact on a person's energy needs, but the major factors that change the demand are weight and activity. Heavier people require more energy and doing activity of any sort, even something like walking, also increases the requirement. When it's colder you need more energy to stay warm, but the main factors are activity and weight.
  • Question 7

Here are the basic energy requirements for an average 25 year old man and woman:

 

Man = 10 500KJ

 

Woman = 8000KJ

 

Use those figures to estimate whether the following people need more or less energy.  Match the energy amount with the correct person.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Boy, 2 years old
5000KJ
Girl, 13 years old
8500KJ
Woman, 25 years old
8000KJ
Man, 25 years old
10 500KJ
Pregnant woman, 25 years old
9500KJ
Male coalminer, 30 years old
15 000KJ
EDDIE SAYS
Well, you probably nailed two straight away as they are given to you in the text! It's also probably not hard to work out that a very active job, like coalmining, requires a lot more energy. So, a pregnant woman, building a baby's body inside her - clearly needs more energy. Then, the child needs the least energy; and a teenage girl is growing fast and actually needs more energy than an adult woman. Don't worry if you didn't get all these spot on - as long as you get the general idea, that's fine.
  • Question 8

Finn has a basic energy requirement of 5200KJ/day.  He's a keen cyclist and spends 2 hours a day on his bike at the weekend.

 

Cyclist

 

When cycling, he uses an extra 2500KJ/hr.

 

What is his total energy requirement on one of his cycling days?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
To work this out: he spends two hours cycling, using 2500KJ/hr = 5000KJ. Add that to his basic energy requirement (5200KJ) and the total need for the day is 10 500KJ/day.
  • Question 9

Look at these three facts:

 

100g peanuts contains 2600KJ of energy.

 

Andrea needs 2100KJ/day of energy as her basic requirement.

 

She likes playing badminton.  This exercise means that Andrea needs an extra 1800KJ/hour.

 

If she was ONLY eating peanuts to fulfill her day's energy requirements (not a great idea!), what weight of peanuts would she have to eat to supply all her energy needs for a day in which she plays 1 hour of badminton?

 

Clue (only if you need it!): work out her total energy need first.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
So, Andrea needs 2100 + 1800 = 3900KJ/day. 100g of peanuts provides 2600KJ of energy. 3900 ÷ 2600 = 1.5 x 100 = 150g of peanuts. Not much to eat, is it? Just shows how packed with energy peanuts are.
  • Question 10

When Jim is sitting down, he uses an extra 6KJ/min of energy in addition to his daily energy requirement.

 

When Jim is going upstairs he uses an extra 36KJ/min in addition to his daily energy requirement.

 

If Jim spends a total of 10 minutes in the day going upstairs, how much time (in minutes) spent sitting down would use up the same amount of energy?

 

Just write the NUMBER of minutes in the text box.

CORRECT ANSWER
60
EDDIE SAYS
OK, so 1 hour and 60 minutes are the same thing, but the question wanted the answer in minutes, so if you put "1", be angry! So, in 10 minutes Jim used a total of 360KJ going upstairs. If sitting uses 6KJ/min, then it's 360 ÷ 6 = 60 minutes. Yes?
---- OR ----

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