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Choose the Homonyms that Fit

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches all of its explanatory definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Choose the Homonyms that Fit' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Welcome word detective! You’re just in time to help us with the latest puzzle, what a stroke of luck!

 

What do you notice about the word stick in the two sentences below?

I threw the stick for my dog to chase.

I used the glue to stick the photos in my album.

 

We’ll give you a clue, the word stick means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example, stick could mean a branch from a tree, or the act of gluing something down.

 

 

                          
 

Below are some different meanings for a word which is spelled the same (a homonym). 

 

The opposite of right.

Leaving something behind.

 

Which word do these sentences define?

a) down

b) around

c) beside 

d) left

 

The answer is left because it matches both of the meanings!


         

Let’s try another:

Being part of society.

One of the suits in a pack of cards.

 

Which word do these sentences define?

a) club

b) hammer

c) trunk

d) group

The answer is club as it matches both of the meanings! 

 

       

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: you may want to use a dictionary for any words you find tricky. You can then write them down on a piece of paper and start your own collection of new words!

 

Hello, word detective, are you ready for an exciting challenge?

 

A log is part of a tree that has been cut off.

Which of the other definitions below also matches with the word log?

 

Burn

Record

Build

Cabin

Shelter

Select one of the words below, which matches with both of these definitions.

 

To be very serious.

The back of a ship.

 

Mast

Bow

Sail

Stern

Frown

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Own, Possess)

(Tunnel, Cave) 

 

Mine

Dig

Yours

Which of the words below have multiple meanings?

 

Check them all carefully as you don't know how many there will be!

 

Range

Many

Bill

Beak

Curtain

Drape

Select the most likely definition of handle next to each sentence below.

 

Choose from:

To hold (verb)

To cope

The part of an object that you grip

 

 To hold (verb)To copeThe part of an object that you grip
It was a difficult situation to handle
Be careful that the pan handle is not hot
We need to handle the kitten with care
Can you hang this sign on the handle?

Type the word below which matches with both of the following definitions.

 

An opening in a wall to pass items through.

A baby bird breaking out of its egg.

  

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Departs, Abandons)

(Pages, Sheets) 

 

Quits

Leaves

Papers

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Teacher, Trainer)

(Vehicle, Carriage)

 

Bus

Leader

Coach

Select the correct definitions for spare from the list below.

 

Check each option carefully as there may be more than one correct answer.

Not enough

Extra

Reserve

Harm

To not harm

To care for

Select the most likely definition of second next to each sentence below.

 

Choose from:

After the first

A unit of time

A short amount of time

 

 After the firstA unit of timeA short amount of time
I finished one second behind him in the race
I really hope I do better than second place this time
Come back to see to me in a second
The second thing you have to do is write your name on your work
I only spoke to her for a second
  • Question 1

Hello, word detective, are you ready for an exciting challenge?

 

A log is part of a tree that has been cut off.

Which of the other definitions below also matches with the word log?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Record
EDDIE SAYS
We can think of this homonym of the log as either a noun or a verb. If you were to keep a log, this would mean keeping a little diary of events. When you are writing something important down in that diary, it can be said that you are logging it. So the meanings are really closely related.
  • Question 2

Select one of the words below, which matches with both of these definitions.

 

To be very serious.

The back of a ship.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Stern
EDDIE SAYS
Do you know anyone who is very stern? This is someone who is serious and strict. The other definition is the trickier one here. The front of a ship is called the bow, while the back is called the stern. Don't be distracted by all of the ship-related words in our options list. Remember, if you don't know another meaning for them that means serious, they can't be the correct answer!
  • Question 3

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Own, Possess)

(Tunnel, Cave) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Mine
EDDIE SAYS
If you own something, you might say, "that's mine!". Mine here expresses that something belongs to you. The second type of mine is an underground tunnel where people might dig for something, like gold for example. I'd definitely want some gold to be mine, wouldn't you?
  • Question 4

Which of the words below have multiple meanings?

 

Check them all carefully as you don't know how many there will be!

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Range
Bill
Drape
EDDIE SAYS
This is a challenging set of words designed to stretch you. So don't panic if you weren't sure what they all meant. Just make sure you make a note of any new words. Range can mean the difference between the largest and smallest value in a set of numbers, it can also refer to an area of flat land or a set of mountains. There are actually a few more definitions for this word too; do you know any more? A bill can be a duck's beak and is also what we call a demand for payment. Finally, a drape is a piece of a material like a curtain but is also a verb which means to wrap material around yourself. For example, you might drape a blanket around your shoulders if you're cold. I'm very impressed if you spotted all three of these word detective?
  • Question 5

Select the most likely definition of handle next to each sentence below.

 

Choose from:

To hold (verb)

To cope

The part of an object that you grip

 

CORRECT ANSWER
 To hold (verb)To copeThe part of an object that you grip
It was a difficult situation to handle
Be careful that the pan handle is not hot
We need to handle the kitten with care
Can you hang this sign on the handle?
EDDIE SAYS
Something that you handle can be something that you literally hold in your hands, or it can be something that you have to cope with or deal with, but don't actually touch. If someone does something wrong at school, the teacher has to handle it, but they don't actually hold that person in their hands, do they? This could be an example of a difficult situation they deal with. The kitten in option three would actually be held in someone's hands, which is why they need to do it with care. A panhandle is something you hold, as is the kind of handle a sign would be hung on. I imagine this as being a door handle, which we would turn or pull with our hand to open.
  • Question 6

Type the word below which matches with both of the following definitions.

 

An opening in a wall to pass items through.

A baby bird breaking out of its egg.

  

CORRECT ANSWER
Hatch
EDDIE SAYS
We have an example of a noun and a verb here. The noun is a hatch which might be used to pass food through in a restaurant when it is ready to be taken to the customer, or some houses have a hatch between the kitchen and dining room to pass food between. What other examples of hatches can you think of? The verb is the use of hatch to refer to a chick cracking and breaking out of its egg when it's ready to be born.
  • Question 7

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Departs, Abandons)

(Pages, Sheets) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Leaves
EDDIE SAYS
The top brackets relate to a more familiar definition of leaves, as in to depart from somewhere. I wonder if you have come across the second definition before? Leaves of paper are sheets of paper. A page would be one side of a piece of paper, while leaves refer to both sides of a sheet of paper.
  • Question 8

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Teacher, Trainer)

(Vehicle, Carriage)

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Coach
EDDIE SAYS
Are you part of any sports teams or clubs? If so, the person who trains you is the coach. If you travel to any sports matches with the rest of your team, you might go on a coach, as in a large bus. Train carriages can also be coaches, for example, you might hear it announced that you are travelling on an eight coach train.
  • Question 9

Select the correct definitions for spare from the list below.

 

Check each option carefully as there may be more than one correct answer.

CORRECT ANSWER
Extra
Reserve
To not harm
EDDIE SAYS
This is quite tricky considering spare is a common word. Think about the meanings we use most regularly first. Here's a simple example: if you have a spare pencil, you have an extra pencil. A spare can also mean a reserve. It's not the first of something that you use, but if the original item, or even person, fails, you have a backup, or reserve, spare. The final correct answer is the trickiest. In a story, if a villain spares someone's life, they allow that person to live and don't harm them. Look up the word spare if you feel a little unsure after this question, as there's quite a lot to take in here.
  • Question 10

Select the most likely definition of second next to each sentence below.

 

Choose from:

After the first

A unit of time

A short amount of time

 

CORRECT ANSWER
 After the firstA unit of timeA short amount of time
I finished one second behind him in the race
I really hope I do better than second place this time
Come back to see to me in a second
The second thing you have to do is write your name on your work
I only spoke to her for a second
EDDIE SAYS
The tricky part of this question is that sometimes a second means a specific amount of time, like finishing one second behind someone in a race, whereas sometimes it means a short amount of time but not literally one second. For example, if someone says come back in a second, they don't literally mean one second because you wouldn't even manage to turn around in that time before you were meant to be back! It's the same for only speaking to someone for a second. We use it to mean a short amount of time, not literally a one second conversation! Fantastic work. In this activity, you developed your skill of being able to match homonym definitions to their related meaning.
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