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Distinguish Between Common Homophones 3

In this worksheet, students look at further examples of words that are pronounced in the same way but have different meanings and spellings.

'Distinguish Between Common Homophones 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   English

Curriculum subtopic:   Spelling: Homophones

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Homophones are words that are pronounced in the same way but have different meanings. They are often spelt differently, too, and it can be hard to know which spelling to use.

For some words there are tricks to help you remember. For example, if you can't remember the difference between meet and meat it might help to remember that meat has the word eat in it.

 

Unfortunately, there are not always tricks to help you to spell homophones, and sometimes you will need a dictionary to help you. In this worksheet you can practise distinguishing between some more unusual homophones.

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

Column A

Column B

principle
the most important person or thing
principal
a basic truth or belief

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

Column A

Column B

stationary
not moving
stationery
supplies such as paper and envelopes

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

Column A

Column B

compliment
to go well with something or make it more complete
complement
a polite expression of praise or admiration

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

Column A

Column B

draught
the first version of something
draft
a current of moving air

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

Column A

Column B

steel
a type of metal
steal
to take something that isn\'t yours

This time, choose the correct spelling of the homophone to complete the sentence.

 

You can have either ice cream or yogurt for your __________.

desert

dessert

Again, choose the correct spelling of the homophone to complete the sentence.

 

The aeroplane flew __________ our house.

passed

past

Choose the correct homophone to complete the sentence.

 

I always have __________ and toast for my breakfast.

serial

cereal

Which is the correct homophone this time?

 

I __________ the answer to the riddle straight away.

guessed

guest

Which is the correct homophone this time?

 

The president declared a day of ___________ after the disaster.

morning

mourning

  • Question 1

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

principle
a basic truth or belief
principal
the most important person or thin...
EDDIE SAYS
Principal can be both an adjective and a noun. The principal reason for his success was hard work (adjective). Mr Jones is the principal of the sixth form college (noun).
  • Question 2

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

stationary
not moving
stationery
supplies such as paper and envelo...
EDDIE SAYS
Stationary is an adjective (the traffic was stationary), while stationery is a noun (we need to order more stationery).
  • Question 3

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

compliment
a polite expression of praise or ...
complement
to go well with something or make...
EDDIE SAYS
This is a very tricky one and a lot of adults get it wrong. If you say \'the sauce complements the meat\', it means that the sauce goes very well with the meat, not that it is praising the meat!
  • Question 4

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

draught
a current of moving air
draft
the first version of something
EDDIE SAYS
Draft can be a noun (Sarah was pleased with the first draft of her story) or a verb (You need to draft your story before you write it out in best).
  • Question 5

Match the homophones with their definitions. Remember to use a dictionary if you are not sure.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

steel
a type of metal
steal
to take something that isn\'t you...
EDDIE SAYS
To steel can also be a verb meaning to prepare yourself for something difficult. For example: Katie knew she hadn\'t won so she was steeling herself for disappointment.
  • Question 6

This time, choose the correct spelling of the homophone to complete the sentence.

 

You can have either ice cream or yogurt for your __________.

CORRECT ANSWER
dessert
EDDIE SAYS
Desert with one s can be a noun (a place with little rain and not many plants) or a verb (to abandon something or someone). The two words are near-homophones rather than true homophones as they are stressed differently. We say DESert, but dessERT.
  • Question 7

Again, choose the correct spelling of the homophone to complete the sentence.

 

The aeroplane flew __________ our house.

CORRECT ANSWER
past
EDDIE SAYS
The word past is a preposition in this sentence, but it can also be a noun (In the past people lived in caves). Passed is the past tense of the verb \'to pass\'.
  • Question 8

Choose the correct homophone to complete the sentence.

 

I always have __________ and toast for my breakfast.

CORRECT ANSWER
cereal
EDDIE SAYS
A serial is something that is published or broadcast at regular intervals. For example: There is a new drama serial on TV every Sunday night.
  • Question 9

Which is the correct homophone this time?

 

I __________ the answer to the riddle straight away.

CORRECT ANSWER
guessed
EDDIE SAYS
The -ed ending is a clue to the fact that guessed is a verb. A guest is a person staying at a hotel or in someone else\'s home.
  • Question 10

Which is the correct homophone this time?

 

The president declared a day of ___________ after the disaster.

CORRECT ANSWER
mourning
EDDIE SAYS
Mourning comes from the verb 'to mourn', which means to feel grief or sadness following a death.
---- OR ----

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