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Word Connections Practice 1

In this practice exercise, students will look for various connections and select the most appropriate word from each set of brackets to best complete sentences, under timed conditions.

'Word Connections Practice 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Exam-Style Questions: Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:  Exam-Style Questions: Word Connections

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

The following activity is a practice exercise to help you measure your success under timed conditions. 

If you are unsure of an answer move on to the next question.  You should come back to questions you found difficult at the end if you have time.  

 

We must pick one word from each set of brackets that can be connected to the word in front of it in the same way.  

Which words from the sets of brackets would best finish this sentence?

Elbow is to (arm, joint, funny) as knee is to (graze, leg, trousers).

 

First, we need to find a connection between elbow and one of the words in brackets.

Elbow is connected to arm as this is where it is found. Elbow could also be connected to joint as this is what it is, and also to funny due to the funny bone!  

 

We need to see if one of these connections can be made with knee and the words in brackets.

A knee is found on your leg, so we have found the connection! It’s the place where these joints are found.

 

Elbow is to arm as knee is to leg.

 

Now it's time to begin this practice exercise.  Good luck!


 

Select the correct connection below.

 

Wherewithal is to (direction, means, togetherness) as scarcity is to (deficiency, trepidation, apprehension).

Means / Deficiency

Means / Trepidation

Direction / Apprehension

Togetherness / Deficiency

Choose the correct answers from the options below. 

 

Devise is to (revise, define, concoct) as confer is to (interfere, converse, defer).

Define / Interfere

Revise / Defer

Concoct / Converse

Define / Defer

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Statuesque is to (dignified, undisturbed, movable) as conventional is to (traditional, novel, vogue).

Undisturbed / Novel

Dignified / Traditional

Moveable / Vogue

Dignified / Vogue

Select the correct connection from the options below. 

 

Definable is to (ineffable, describable, distinct) as ignorant is to (knowledgeable, ignore, discourteous).

Distinct / Ignore

Describable / Discourteous

Distinct / Knowledgeable

Ineffable / Knowledgeable

Select the answer below

 

Altitude is to (mountaineering, elevation, pinnacle) as depth is to (wisdom, shallow, vertical).

 

Mountaineering / Wisdom

Elevation / Shallow

Verticle / Pinnacle

Elevation / Wisdom

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Dour is to (lacklustre, exuberant, exposed) as fortunate is to (clueless, hapless, miserable).

Exuberant / Hapless

Lacklustre / Clueless

Exposed / Miserable

Exposed / Clueless

Select the correct options below, one word from each set of brackets.

 

Omen is to (forewarning, masculine, onerous) as memoirs is to (autobiography, presentation, commemorate).  

Forewarning / Commemorate

Masculine / Presentation

Forewarning / Autobiography

Onerous / Presentation

Choose one word from each set of brackets to make the connection. 

 

Kangaroo is to (Australia, wallaby, marsupial) as newt is to (webbed, amphibian, reservoir).

 

Marsupial / Amphibian

Wallaby / Reservoir

Australian / Webbed

Marsupial / Webbed

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Appendix is to (stomach, chapter, book) as encore is to (prelude, theatre, intermission).

Stomach / Intermission

Book / Theatre

Chapter / Prelude

Stomach / Theatre

Select the correct options below, one word from each set of brackets.

 

Signature is to (unidentifiable, attribute, commonplace) as generic is to (universal, specific, batch).  

Unidentifiable / Specific

Attribute / Batch

Commonplace / Batch

Attribute / Universal

  • Question 1

Select the correct connection below.

 

Wherewithal is to (direction, means, togetherness) as scarcity is to (deficiency, trepidation, apprehension).

CORRECT ANSWER
Means / Deficiency
EDDIE SAYS
There are some tricky words here detective, so let's take a look.
If someone has the wherewithal to do something, it means they have a way, or the means, to do it. As the first part of the word is 'where', it's easy to get tricked into thinking this is to do with directions - but it's not!
So what about scarcity? Again, it's easy to get tricked by the first part of the word, but this is nothing to do with fear. It means to not have enough of something - which means we have a synonym connection to deficiency.
  • Question 2

Choose the correct answers from the options below. 

 

Devise is to (revise, define, concoct) as confer is to (interfere, converse, defer).

CORRECT ANSWER
Concoct / Converse
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever concocted a plan with your friends? It means to think up a plan, which is a synonym for devise. So what about a synonym for confer? The most likely time you might have heard the word confer is in a quiz when contestants are told, "No conferring!" This means they're not allowed to talk to each other about their answers. So if confer means discuss, then we can spot the synonym - converse! Don't worry if you didn't know converse means talk. Can you now detect the link with the word conversation?
  • Question 3

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Statuesque is to (dignified, undisturbed, movable) as conventional is to (traditional, novel, vogue).

CORRECT ANSWER
Dignified / Traditional
EDDIE SAYS
We have synonym connections again here. Did you need a dictionary to help you or did you already know the meanings of these words?
Someone statuesque is graceful and beautiful - and we can describe this as being dignified.
So what about conventional? This means to be traditional. Conventions and traditions are customs that get passed on through generations. Can you think of any traditions that you follow?
  • Question 4

Select the correct connection from the options below. 

 

Definable is to (ineffable, describable, distinct) as ignorant is to (knowledgeable, ignore, discourteous).

CORRECT ANSWER
Ineffable / Knowledgeable
EDDIE SAYS
If you can define something, you can describe it and it is distinct and clear, so we have two synonyms here. What about ineffable? The prefix 'in-' is a useful clue to show we have an opposite. It means something is indescribable!
So what about ignorant? This means you are not very knowledgeable - this gives us another antonym connection in our brackets! We've cracked it!
  • Question 5

Select the answer below

 

Altitude is to (mountaineering, elevation, pinnacle) as depth is to (wisdom, shallow, vertical).

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Elevation / Wisdom
EDDIE SAYS
You're most likely to hear the word altitude if you're reading about someone climbing a mountain. It means the height above sea level that they have climbed - which we can also call the elevation. Elevation means going up!
Be careful with pinnacle - altitude is high at the peak, but we can't actually use altitude and pinnacle as synonyms.
Depth is the opposite - it's how far down you go! But there's not really a synonym here for that. Have you ever heard of a person having depth?
This is the definition we want here. A person with depth has knowledge and wisdom - there's our synonym!
  • Question 6

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Dour is to (lacklustre, exuberant, exposed) as fortunate is to (clueless, hapless, miserable).

CORRECT ANSWER
Exuberant / Hapless
EDDIE SAYS
Someone who is very dour is cheerless and miserable. We can spot an antonym connection to exuberant - you'd much rather be around an exuberant person than a dour one!
So what about an antonym for fortunate? This means lucky, so we're looking for one that means unlucky - which is hapless.
  • Question 7

Select the correct options below, one word from each set of brackets.

 

Omen is to (forewarning, masculine, onerous) as memoirs is to (autobiography, presentation, commemorate).  

CORRECT ANSWER
Forewarning / Autobiography
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever heard of superstitious people talking about good and bad omens - like a black cat running out in front of you being lucky, or walking under a ladder being unlucky? If you believe in omens then you believe that they are ways of predicting the future - they can be thought of as forewarnings.
This means we are dealing with synonyms again. If someone is writing their memoirs, they are writing down their memories and experiences. If you are writing about your own life, we also call this an autobiography.
What's next, detective?
  • Question 8

Choose one word from each set of brackets to make the connection. 

 

Kangaroo is to (Australia, wallaby, marsupial) as newt is to (webbed, amphibian, reservoir).

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Marsupial / Amphibian
EDDIE SAYS
Kangaroo mothers carry their babies in pouches on their bellies, so they have a special name which is marsupial. This is a way of classifying them, so we need to classify a newt. As they live in water and on land, we can identify them as amphibians.
  • Question 9

Choose one word from each set of brackets.

 

Appendix is to (stomach, chapter, book) as encore is to (prelude, theatre, intermission).

CORRECT ANSWER
Book / Theatre
EDDIE SAYS
Have you used your detective skills to spot that an appendix and an encore both come at the end of something - an appendix at the end of a book and an encore at the end of a theatre show.
An appendix is extra information or pages at the end of a book. You might look at them if you need extra information. If the audience really enjoyed a concert or show, they shout 'Encore' at the end, which means 'again', to show they want an extra performance.
  • Question 10

Select the correct options below, one word from each set of brackets.

 

Signature is to (unidentifiable, attribute, commonplace) as generic is to (universal, specific, batch).  

CORRECT ANSWER
Unidentifiable / Specific
EDDIE SAYS
Use your detective skills here to think about what a signature is for - it is a unique way of identifying someone. So the word unidentifiable is an antonym here.
Now let's look for an opposite to generic. Generic is a way of saying something is general - so the opposite here is specific.
---- OR ----

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