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Terminology: Understand Verbs

In this worksheet, students understand the work that verbs do, and how they can be changed in sentences to change meaning.

'Terminology: Understand Verbs' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 1

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation

Curriculum subtopic:  Use Past and Present Tense

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Every sentence needs a verb.


My puppy is a beagle. His name is Ronnie. He loves his ball. He plays with it every day.

 

There are thousands of verbs in the English language, and choosing the right verb can make a big difference to our writing.

 

Some verbs mean almost the same as each other.

Ronnie loves playing with his ball.

Ronnie enjoys playing with his ball.

Changing the verb 'loves' to 'enjoys' doesn't really affect the meaning of the sentence, but if we use the verb 'hates' instead, we change the meaning completely.

Ronnie hates playing with his ball.

 

Sometimes using a different verb doesn't actually change the meaning of the sentence, but it gives the reader more information, so it improves the sentence.

Sally went to school.

Sally rushed to school.

In the second sentence we know that Sally was in a hurry.

Read the sentence below.

 

Katie talked to her teacher for a long time.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'talked' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

spoke

helped

ran

Read the sentence below.

 

James enjoys playing rugby.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'enjoys' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

dreads

hates

likes

Read the sentence below.

 

Isabel slithered along the icy road.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'slithered' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

walked

slid

ran

Read the sentence below.

 

The fox leapt over the fence and ran across the field.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'leapt' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

slid

ran

jumped

Read the sentence below.

 

The children got their coats and went outside.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'got' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

cleaned

fetched

bought

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

'Come here!' said Mrs Jones.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'said' if Mrs Jones was talking very loudly?

whispered

shouted

murmured

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

After the fight the dog went into its kennel and starting licking its wounded leg.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'went' to show that the dog was injured?

limped

leapt

ran

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

Jamie was in a hurry. He ate his dinner and then rushed out to football training.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'ate' to show that Jamie ate his dinner quickly?

chewed

gobbled

drank

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

The squirrel ran across the garden.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'ran' to show that the squirrel ran quickly and lightly?

charged

galloped

scurried

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

The baby went across the carpet to fetch its teddy.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'went' to show that the baby went on its hands and knees?

scurried

crawled

ran

  • Question 1

Read the sentence below.

 

Katie talked to her teacher for a long time.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'talked' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
spoke
EDDIE SAYS
The verb 'spoke' means that someone is speaking, which is the same as talking.
'Helped' means to assist someone, and 'ran' means running!
  • Question 2

Read the sentence below.

 

James enjoys playing rugby.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'enjoys' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
likes
EDDIE SAYS
Here, 'likes' is the closest in meaning to 'enjoys'.
'Dreads' and 'hates' both mean the opposite of 'enjoys'.
  • Question 3

Read the sentence below.

 

Isabel slithered along the icy road.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'slithered' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
slid
EDDIE SAYS
Although all three verbs would make sense, only 'slid' has the same meaning as 'slithered'.
  • Question 4

Read the sentence below.

 

The fox leapt over the fence and ran across the field.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'leapt' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
jumped
EDDIE SAYS
'Jumped' means the same thing as 'leapt' - but 'slid' means to slide and 'ran' means to run, so neither of these words would really work in the sentence.
  • Question 5

Read the sentence below.

 

The children got their coats and went outside.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could be used instead of 'got' without changing the meaning of the sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
fetched
EDDIE SAYS
'Fetched' is closest in meaning to 'got'.
  • Question 6

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

'Come here!' said Mrs Jones.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'said' if Mrs Jones was talking very loudly?

CORRECT ANSWER
shouted
EDDIE SAYS
'Whispered' and 'murmured' both mean to speak quietly, so 'shouted' is the correct option here.
  • Question 7

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

After the fight the dog went into its kennel and starting licking its wounded leg.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'went' to show that the dog was injured?

CORRECT ANSWER
limped
EDDIE SAYS
'Leapt' and 'ran' both mean that the dog went quickly into its kennel, but we can tell from the sentence that the dog was wounded in the fight, so 'limped' is the correct word here.
  • Question 8

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

Jamie was in a hurry. He ate his dinner and then rushed out to football training.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'ate' to show that Jamie ate his dinner quickly?

CORRECT ANSWER
gobbled
EDDIE SAYS
'Gobbled' is the correct word in this sentence as it means to eat something very quickly.
'Chewed' means the act of chewing, and 'drank' means drinking something, so it wouldn't work in this sentence as Jamie didn't drink his dinner!
  • Question 9

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

The squirrel ran across the garden.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'ran' to show that the squirrel ran quickly and lightly?

CORRECT ANSWER
scurried
EDDIE SAYS
'Scurried' is the most suitable word here as it means to move quickly with short, quick steps.
  • Question 10

Some verbs add extra information to a sentence without changing the meaning completely.

 

The baby went across the carpet to fetch its teddy.

 

Which of the verbs in the list could you use instead of 'went' to show that the baby went on its hands and knees?

CORRECT ANSWER
crawled
EDDIE SAYS
Here, 'crawled' is the most suitable substitute for 'went', as the baby would not be able to scurry or run yet!
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