The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Use Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Correctly

In this worksheet, students explore how to use adjectives accurately in their writing, with a special focus on comparatives and superlatives.

'Use Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Correctly' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:   Writing

Curriculum subtopic:   Use Accurate Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Adjectives form a large class of words. Their function is to describe a noun by adding further detail.

 

Poster showing synonyms of great

 

 

The description may be physical.

For example: the red car; the loud music; the blue towel.

 

In addition to this, the adjective may describe something more abstract.

For example: a controversial topic; a confusing puzzle; a melancholy mood.

 

Using ambitious and carefully chosen adjectives in your writing to describe nouns will make your writing interesting and varied.

Adjectives can also be used to compare things.

For example: adding -er to the word small results in the comparative adjective smaller.

The puppy was smaller than its brother.

 

If three or more things are being compared then -est can be added to the word small, resulting in the superlative adjective smallest.

The puppy was the smallest of the litter.

 

Superlative adjectives can be used for exaggeration.

That was the hottest curry in the world!

 

Note that the 't' at the end of the adjective 'hot' needs to be doubled before the -est ending is added. This is necessary for words with a short vowel sound just before the final consonant. Words ending in -y usually drop the -y and add -ier and -iest.

 

Adjective

Comparative

Superlative

crunchy

crunchier

crunchiest

fat

fatter

fattest

small

smaller

smallest

 

Two hands holding an apple and a pear

 

 

There are some adjectives that are grammatically irregular and break this pattern. For example:

 

Adjective

Comparative

Superlative

bad

worse

worst

far

further

furthest

good

better

best

 

Other adjectives can only be intensified or compared by adding the word 'more' or 'most' to the adjective.

 

Adjective

Comparative

Superlative

disgusting

more disgusting

most disgusting

careful

more careful

most careful

helpless

more helpless

most helpless

 

 

Man with a question mark over his head

 

What is the function of an adjective in a sentence?

It describes an action

It describes a noun

It links parts of a sentence

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

The elderly man hobbled down the street, leaning on his stick and breathing heavily.

Elderly

Hobbled

Stick

Breathing

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

The grumpy teacher threw his chalk at the students.

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

Mary walked briskly through the deserted street.

Match each grammatical term with their correct definition. Hover your mouse over the definitions to see them in full.

Column A

Column B

Superlative
A form of adjective used to exaggerate or express ...
Comparative
A form of adjective used when comparing two nouns.

How would you adapt the adjective 'slimy' to make it a comparative adjective?

Slimier

Most slimy

Slimiest

Slime-like

How would you adapt the adjective 'old' to turn it into a superlative adjective?  What would the new word be?

 

Identify the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective 'generous'.

Column A

Column B

Comparative
More generous
Superlative
Most generous

Identify the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective 'helpful'.

Helpfuller

More helpful

Most helpful

Helpfullest

Match the sentence with the type of adjective it contains. Hover your mouse over the sentences to see them in full.

Column A

Column B

Comparative adjective
My mum's cooking is worse than your mum's cooking.
Superlative adjective
My dog is the best in the world.
  • Question 1

What is the function of an adjective in a sentence?

CORRECT ANSWER
It describes a noun
EDDIE SAYS
Adjectives describe nouns. They can be placed in front of the noun e.g. 'the red car' or later in the sentence e.g. 'the car was red'. Adjectives add detail to your writing.
  • Question 2

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

The elderly man hobbled down the street, leaning on his stick and breathing heavily.

CORRECT ANSWER
Elderly
EDDIE SAYS
The adjective 'elderly' describes the noun 'man' and gives the reader more information about him.
  • Question 3

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

The grumpy teacher threw his chalk at the students.

CORRECT ANSWER
Grumpy
EDDIE SAYS
The adjective is 'grumpy' as this provides extra information about the 'teacher' (the noun). Is this beginning to get less daunting?
  • Question 4

Identify the adjective in the following sentence.

 

Mary walked briskly through the deserted street.

CORRECT ANSWER
Deserted
EDDIE SAYS
The adjective is 'deserted' as this describes the state of the 'street' (the noun). 'Briskly' describes the way he is walking and is an example of an adverb.
  • Question 5

Match each grammatical term with their correct definition. Hover your mouse over the definitions to see them in full.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Superlative
A form of adjective used to exagg...
Comparative
A form of adjective used when com...
EDDIE SAYS
A superlative is usually formed by adding 'est' to the original adjective. A comparative is usually formed by adding 'er' to the original adjective. Be aware that there are some exceptions though!
  • Question 6

How would you adapt the adjective 'slimy' to make it a comparative adjective?

CORRECT ANSWER
Slimier
EDDIE SAYS
The comparative is 'slimier' which could be used in a sentence such as 'My seaweed feels slimier than yours'. The -y ending needs to be changed to -ier. Are you feeling more confident?
  • Question 7

How would you adapt the adjective 'old' to turn it into a superlative adjective?  What would the new word be?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Oldest
EDDIE SAYS
To exaggerate or show something to the highest degree, you can usually add 'est' at the end of the original adjective.
  • Question 8

Identify the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective 'generous'.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Comparative
More generous
Superlative
Most generous
EDDIE SAYS
It's normal for adjectives with three syllables or more to use 'more' and 'most' rather than taking the -er and -est endings. You've got this, keep going.
  • Question 9

Identify the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective 'helpful'.

CORRECT ANSWER
More helpful
Most helpful
EDDIE SAYS
Adjectives ending in -ful also take 'more' and 'most' rather than adding -er and -est.
  • Question 10

Match the sentence with the type of adjective it contains. Hover your mouse over the sentences to see them in full.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Comparative adjective
My mum's cooking is worse than yo...
Superlative adjective
My dog is the best in the world.
EDDIE SAYS
The comparative adjective 'worse' is adapted from the adjective 'bad'. The superlative adjective 'best' is adapted from the adjective 'good'. Phew, those questions were challenging but you made it to the end. How about attempting one more activity before taking a well-deserved break?
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.