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Evaluate Key Quotes and Their Impact in 'A Christmas Carol'

In this worksheet, students will learn to evaluate key quotes and comment on their impact in the novel.

'Evaluate Key Quotes and Their Impact in 'A Christmas Carol'' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   English Literature

GCSE Boards:   Eduqas, OCR, Pearson Edexcel, AQA

Curriculum topic:   19th Century Prose, 19th Century Novel, The 19th Century Novel

Curriculum subtopic:   A Christmas Carol

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Scrooge.jpg

 

'A Christmas Carol' is a novella (short story) written by Charles Dickens in 1843.  

 

It is set in Victorian London over the time period Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

 

Victorians were not a festive bunch when Dickens wrote his novel.

 

This story helped reinvent Christmas celebrations and Christmas spirit!

 

If it wasn't for Mr Dickens - you may still well only be receiving a lump of coal at Christmas!

 

 

You should always refer to your own text when working through these examples.  These quotations are for reference only.

 

Underline the one word in the quotation below that suggests that Scrooge is an isolated character in this extract?

\"I wish to be left alone,\" said Scrooge. \"Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer. I don\'t make merry myself at Christmas, and I can\'t afford to make idle people merry. \"

Image result for workhouse victorian times

 

Which words and phrases below demonstrate how bad conditions were in the establishments (workhouses/prisons) in the Victorian era.

 

"At this festive season of the year, Mr Scrooge," said the gentlemen, taking up a pen, "it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time.  Many thousands are in want of common necessaries; hundreds of thousands are in want of common comforts, sir."

'Taking up a pen'

"who suffer greatly at the present time"

"Many thousands are in want of common necessities"

"It is more than usually desirable"

"destitute"

 "I wear the chain I forged in life. I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.  Is its pattern strange to you?"

 

How is the ghost of Marley suffering in the afterlife because of his greed in life? (Write a minimum of 1 paragraph for your response)

Using inference is another tactic to gaining higher marks. If you have a stab at working out something that isn't directly stated, you are showing your examiner that you know enough about the text to infer what has gone on.  

 

The following line is said by the Ghost of Christmas Present "I see an empty seat".  What could be inferred from this?

That the ghost is about to sit down

That Mrs Cratchit has mis-counted the number of chairs needed

That Tiny Tim may die in the future without Scrooge's help

That the Cratchit's were sharing chairs

In stave four, 'The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come' shows Scrooge lots of scenes which feature a death.  As readers, we work out that it is Scrooge that has died, but Scrooge doesn't want to believe it.  

 

Match the quotes with the scene being shown to Scrooge. 

Column A

Column B

"Well, Old Scratch has got his own at last, hey?"
Scrooge's office with his replacement owner of the...
"Why wasn't he natural in his lifetime? If he had...
A young couple who owe Scrooge money. They are re...
"A cat was tearing at the door, and there was a so...
Scrooge's abandoned body alone in his house
"He is past relenting - he is dead. We might sleep...
Scrooge's accountant colleagues
"It was an office still, but not his. The furnitu...
The black market - Joe's shop

Scrooge's character changes dramatically throughout the novel as he learns from the ghosts.  

 

Fill in the literary devices below that help you evaluate his transformation through the novel.

Column A

Column B

"Well, Old Scratch has got his own at last, hey?"
Scrooge's office with his replacement owner of the...
"Why wasn't he natural in his lifetime? If he had...
A young couple who owe Scrooge money. They are re...
"A cat was tearing at the door, and there was a so...
Scrooge's abandoned body alone in his house
"He is past relenting - he is dead. We might sleep...
Scrooge's accountant colleagues
"It was an office still, but not his. The furnitu...
The black market - Joe's shop

At the end of the novel it is clear that Scrooge has undergone a transformation.  He uses repetition of a  literary device to emphasise this change.  What literary device does Dickens use?

 

"I don't know what to do!" cried Scrooge, laughing and crying in the same breath and making a perfect Laocoon of himself with his stockings. "I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a school-boy.  I am as giddy as a drunken man.  A merry Christmas to everybody!  A happy New Year to all the world!  Hallo here! Whoop! Hallo!""

Assonance

Personification

Metaphor

Simile

Image result for cratchits

 

The ghosts show Scrooge the Cratchits as a family in stave three and stave four.  The scene in stave three is full of joy, happiness and love for each other.  In stave four, family unity and love is still there, but there is a sadness among them as Tiny Tim has just died.  

 

Complete the description below which shows the contrast in their interactions in the two scenes. 

Assonance

Personification

Metaphor

Simile

Can you match the quote to the correct terminology? 

 

Look at the quotes below and choose the correct literary device that it connects with: 

Column A

Column B

"The oranges and lemons were urgently entreating a...
Simile
"There's such a goose Martha!"
Personification
"I am as giddy as a drunken man!"
List
"Mrs Cratchit, dressed out but poorly in a twice t...
Repetition
"The raisins were plentiful and rare, the almonds ...
Metaphor
"I made it link by link and yard by yard"
Pathetic fallacy
"the fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhol...
Hyperbole (exaggeration)
"What reason have you to be merry? You're poor eno...
Rhetorical question

QUIZ TIME!

 

And finally - let's test your knowledge about Scrooge.

 

In which stave will you find the following quotes about Scrooge? 

 

Good luck!

 Stave oneStave twoStave threeStave fourStave five
"Come in! Come in and know me better man!"
"I see old Scratch has had his last"
"What is that upon your cheek?"
"I am as light as a feather!"
"Speak comfort to me Jacob!"
"Why wasn't he natural in his lifetime?"
"A squeezing wrenching covetous old sinner"
  • Question 1

Underline the one word in the quotation below that suggests that Scrooge is an isolated character in this extract?

CORRECT ANSWER
"I wish to be left alone," said Scrooge. "Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer. I don't make merry myself at Christmas, and I can't afford to make idle people merry. "
EDDIE SAYS
Did you spot 'alone' as the key word. Scrooge really isn't a social fellow at the start of the story! He is rude to everyone he comes in contact with - including his only family - his nephew Fred. He's pretty harsh to the charity workers when they ask for a small donation - Scrooge can afford a large donation and would still have plenty left! Can you find any other examples of how is shown as an isolated character at the start of the story?
  • Question 2

Image result for workhouse victorian times

 

Which words and phrases below demonstrate how bad conditions were in the establishments (workhouses/prisons) in the Victorian era.

 

"At this festive season of the year, Mr Scrooge," said the gentlemen, taking up a pen, "it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time.  Many thousands are in want of common necessaries; hundreds of thousands are in want of common comforts, sir."

CORRECT ANSWER
"who suffer greatly at the present time"
"Many thousands are in want of common necessities"
"destitute"
EDDIE SAYS
Like the previous question, it is useful to refer to context and Dickens' methods when answering your exam question. Top tip to gain higher marks: say a lot about a little. The more in depth you analyse your quote, the higher up the grade ladder you will climb! Look carefully at particular words for example: "destitute" What connotations does this word have? It's not just saying they are poor - being destitute is far worse and a reader would have more sympathy. Remember: Dickens is using his characters and story to get a message across. Think like a Victorian reading it, and you will get higher marks!
  • Question 3

 "I wear the chain I forged in life. I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.  Is its pattern strange to you?"

 

How is the ghost of Marley suffering in the afterlife because of his greed in life? (Write a minimum of 1 paragraph for your response)

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Example: It is clear that Marley is suffering in the afterlife for his greed in life and this is symbolised by the chain that he now wears. Marley has to carry a heavy and long "chain he forged in life" around with him in the afterlife because he was greedy and mean when he was alive. This is a symbol that his greed has caught up with him and is now something that weighs him down and constrains him.
  • Question 4

Using inference is another tactic to gaining higher marks. If you have a stab at working out something that isn't directly stated, you are showing your examiner that you know enough about the text to infer what has gone on.  

 

The following line is said by the Ghost of Christmas Present "I see an empty seat".  What could be inferred from this?

CORRECT ANSWER
That Tiny Tim may die in the future without Scrooge's help
EDDIE SAYS
Did you get this right? When an author infers, they make a point clear without spelling it out to the reader. This is a very effective method as it ensures the reader is engaged in the storyline. In this case, the ghost does not need to spell it out to Scrooge, he clearly gets the picture (that he can see before him!)
  • Question 5

In stave four, 'The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come' shows Scrooge lots of scenes which feature a death.  As readers, we work out that it is Scrooge that has died, but Scrooge doesn't want to believe it.  

 

Match the quotes with the scene being shown to Scrooge. 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

"Well, Old Scratch has got his ow...
Scrooge's accountant colleagues
"Why wasn't he natural in his lif...
The black market - Joe's shop
"A cat was tearing at the door, a...
Scrooge's abandoned body alone in...
"He is past relenting - he is dea...
A young couple who owe Scrooge mo...
"It was an office still, but not ...
Scrooge's office with his replace...
EDDIE SAYS
This really brings home to Scrooge that not one single person cares that he has died. All of his staff sell all his belongings on the black market, his work colleagues 'might' go to his funeral - if there's free food, and his body is left alone in his house with cats and rats trying to get into the room!
  • Question 6

Scrooge's character changes dramatically throughout the novel as he learns from the ghosts.  

 

Fill in the literary devices below that help you evaluate his transformation through the novel.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
For your exam, you are given an extract from the novel. You need to use the extract plus your knowledge of the whole novel to answer the question. A useful tip is to look at comparing characters and themes, thinking about how they evolve/are presented through the novel. If you can use terminology to show the transformation, even better to bump those grades up!
  • Question 7

At the end of the novel it is clear that Scrooge has undergone a transformation.  He uses repetition of a  literary device to emphasise this change.  What literary device does Dickens use?

 

"I don't know what to do!" cried Scrooge, laughing and crying in the same breath and making a perfect Laocoon of himself with his stockings. "I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a school-boy.  I am as giddy as a drunken man.  A merry Christmas to everybody!  A happy New Year to all the world!  Hallo here! Whoop! Hallo!""

CORRECT ANSWER
Simile
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully, you spotted the four similies that Dickens uses one after another. The impact of this is to show how Scrooge's mindset and attitude has changed. We get the sense that this man is feeling like he has gained a second chance at life and is euphoric as a result!
  • Question 8

Image result for cratchits

 

The ghosts show Scrooge the Cratchits as a family in stave three and stave four.  The scene in stave three is full of joy, happiness and love for each other.  In stave four, family unity and love is still there, but there is a sadness among them as Tiny Tim has just died.  

 

Complete the description below which shows the contrast in their interactions in the two scenes. 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The Cratchits are a really good example of representation of family and Christmas spirit. Their closeness is still really evident, even though they have just lost a family member. Don't worry though - Tiny Tim doesn't really die, as Scrooge saves him at the end! Phew!
  • Question 9

Can you match the quote to the correct terminology? 

 

Look at the quotes below and choose the correct literary device that it connects with: 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

"The oranges and lemons were urge...
Personification
"There's such a goose Martha!"
Hyperbole (exaggeration)
"I am as giddy as a drunken man!"
Simile
"Mrs Cratchit, dressed out but po...
Metaphor
"The raisins were plentiful and r...
List
"I made it link by link and yard ...
Repetition
"the fog came pouring in at every...
Pathetic fallacy
"What reason have you to be merry...
Rhetorical question
EDDIE SAYS
Some techniques can be more than one type of terminology: "The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole" is pathetic fallacy, but also personification. If you recognise multiple techniques, make sure you mention them in your analysis. Use every opportunity that you can to impress your examiner!
  • Question 10

QUIZ TIME!

 

And finally - let's test your knowledge about Scrooge.

 

In which stave will you find the following quotes about Scrooge? 

 

Good luck!

CORRECT ANSWER
 Stave oneStave twoStave threeStave fourStave five
"Come in! Come in and know me better man!"
"I see old Scratch has had his last"
"What is that upon your cheek?"
"I am as light as a feather!"
"Speak comfort to me Jacob!"
"Why wasn't he natural in his lifetime?"
"A squeezing wrenching covetous old sinner"
EDDIE SAYS
Well done! You are now a professional at quotes. Why not make a revision poster or flash cards to help you revise?
Try it ---- OR ----

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