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Compare Language in 'Ozymandias' and Other Poems

In this worksheet, students will practise their language comparison skills between 'Ozymandias' and other poems.

'Compare Language in 'Ozymandias' and Other Poems' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   English Literature

GCSE Boards:   AQA, Eduqas

Curriculum topic:   Poetry, Poetry 1789 to the Present Day

Curriculum subtopic:   Power and Conflict: 'Ozymandias', 'Ozymandias'

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Want to compare your language comparison skills in 'Ozymandias' and other poems in your 'Power and Conflict' cluster?

 

 

Thought bubble

 

 

Well, you've come to the right place. In this activity, you'll practise comparing the way the poets use language to convey different and similar attitudes and ideas. 

 

 

In your exam, you'll do really well to compare the way that poets use language to present their attitudes. You'll do even better if you can compare the way they use language to show different/similar attitudes and ideas. You'll do the best if you can compare the language that is used and how it is used.

 

 

 

 

Here's an example of some good language comparison:

 

 

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses the technique of sibilance, in order to create a sense of longevity and highlight the slow passing of time. The sibilance in "half sunk a shattered visage lies..." extends the reading time due to the slow pronunciation of the consonant 's'. It reinforces the oldness of Ozymandias' statue and links in with the theme of solitude- Ozymandias will remain alone for a long time. The poem 'London' also uses the technique of sibilance, when referring to the "hapless Soldiers sigh", however, the effect created is very different. In this context, a hissing sound is almost created, which reinforces Blake's hatred of corruption in society. Both poems use sibilance in a similar way; to convey a negative tone.

 

"And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command"

 

 

In the poem 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses personification 

 

Tick two other poems which use personification 

 

'Checking Out Me History'

Extract from 'The Prelude'

'War Photographer'

'Exposure'

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses juxtaposition of adjectives in the quote "of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare".

 

What other poem uses juxtaposition?

 

Write the number of the correct answer down below.

1. 'The Emigree' ("My city takes me dancing through the city of walls")

2. 'London' ("How the chimney-sweepers cry")

3. 'Storm on the Island' ("Exploding comfortably down on the cliffs")

4. 'Poppies' ("A split second and you were away, intoxicated...")

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley presents the theme of the power of nature.

 

 

What one other poem from the selection below also presents this theme? Write the title of the poem in the text box, below.

 

Extract from 'The Prelude'

'Charge of the Light Brigade'

'London'

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses enjambement to create a sense of time slowly passing by 

 

Hint: enjambment is when a sentence continues beyond the end of a line or stanza.

 

Which two other poems use enjambement?

 

'The Emigree'

'The Charge of the Light Brigade'

'Poppies' 

'Kamikaze'

How do 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' use personal and possessive pronouns (for example, 'I', 'me', 'my') to present a theme.

 

Pick one number out of:

 

1. 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' both use personal and possessive pronouns to present the theme of solitude, which helps the reader to empathise with the main characters of the poem.

 

2. 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' both use personal and possessive pronouns to emphasise how the Duke and Ozymandias are power-hungry, arrogant and cruel. 

How is 'Ozymandias' similar to 'Exposure'?

 

Pick one option from below. Write the correct number in the text box.

 

1. Both poems use the technique of sibilance. In 'Ozymandias' this sibilance conveys how unpleasant Ozymandias is, through the hissing sound illustrated in "survive, stamped on these lifeless things". In 'Exposure' sibilance could be used to emphasise the freezing cold in "the merciless iced east winds". In both cases, the sibilance extends the sentences and conveys, through unfolding tone and sound, an unpleasant theme.

 

2. Both poems use the technique of personification. In 'Ozymandias' the statue is personified by the quote "which yet survive". In 'Exposure' personification is present in the quote "pale flakes with fingering stealth". This emphasises happens in both poems, as personification is usually used to grant objects human-like qualities.

How are 'Ozymandias' and 'Tissue' different in the way they present power?

 

Fill out the table below.

Tick the devices which belong to 'Ozymandias' and/or Extract from 'The Prelude'. Some devices are shared by both poems.

 

 PersonificationPersonal pronounsNatural imageryRepetitionSibilance
'Ozymandias'
Extract from 'The Prelude'

Name another poem where, like 'Ozymandias', there is a semantic field of destruction

 

 

Pick two out of the options below. Write the title in the text-box:

 

'Kamikaze'

'Poppies'

'Storm on the Island'

'Bayonet Charge'

Last one! A little bit easier, this time.

 

 

Name three language devices which link 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess'.

Metaphor

Personal and possessive pronouns

Theme of arrogance

Personification

Present tense verbs

Imagery of love and sexuality

  • Question 1

"And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command"

 

 

In the poem 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses personification 

 

Tick two other poems which use personification 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Extract from 'The Prelude'
'Exposure'
EDDIE SAYS
'Exposure' and Extract from 'The Prelude' both use personification to emphasise the power of nature. However, in 'Ozymandias', personification is used to give life to the statue- quite ironic given the state of it (broken and destroyed). Think about the ways that these three poems relate through the use of personification. Different objects may be personified in the individual poems, (nature, the statue...) so have a think about what the effect is of personifying these different things?
  • Question 2

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses juxtaposition of adjectives in the quote "of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare".

 

What other poem uses juxtaposition?

 

Write the number of the correct answer down below.

1. 'The Emigree' ("My city takes me dancing through the city of walls")

2. 'London' ("How the chimney-sweepers cry")

3. 'Storm on the Island' ("Exploding comfortably down on the cliffs")

4. 'Poppies' ("A split second and you were away, intoxicated...")

CORRECT ANSWER
3
EDDIE SAYS
Juxtaposition is present in the verb "exploding" and the adverb "comfortably". These contrasting words create a dramatic tone in the poem- it jolts the reader to awareness. How can something explode comfortably? The use of juxtaposition in 'Ozymandias' almost highlights Ozymandias' foolishness- despite his beliefs of being the most powerful ruler to live, his statue is "boundless and bare". Think about how the use of juxtaposition differs in the poem 'Ozymandias' and the poem 'Storm on the Island'. Does it have the same effect for both poems?
  • Question 3

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley presents the theme of the power of nature.

 

 

What one other poem from the selection below also presents this theme? Write the title of the poem in the text box, below.

 

Extract from 'The Prelude'

'Charge of the Light Brigade'

'London'

CORRECT ANSWER
Extract from 'The Prelude'
EDDIE SAYS
Extract from 'The Prelude' is the correct answer! The poem 'Ozymandias' emphasises nature's power through the use of adjectives, for example, "boundless and bare" and "lone and level sands stretch far away". In Extract from 'The Prelude', Wordsworth uses the technique of personification to give life to nature. This gives nature a lot of power, as it has human characteristics/qualities. Wordsworth gives nature a monstrous and destructive side. Notice how both poems use different language techniques to present the same theme. See if you can identify other similar themes between the two poems and make note of the language techniques used to present them.
  • Question 4

In 'Ozymandias', Shelley uses enjambement to create a sense of time slowly passing by 

 

Hint: enjambment is when a sentence continues beyond the end of a line or stanza.

 

Which two other poems use enjambement?

 

'The Emigree'

'The Charge of the Light Brigade'

'Poppies' 

'Kamikaze'

CORRECT ANSWER
Poppies
'Poppies'
Kamikaze
'Kamikaze'
EDDIE SAYS
'Kamikaze' and 'Poppies' both use enjambement. Similar to the effect created in 'Ozymandias', the use of enjambement in these two poems creates a sense of time passing by. There are some differences, though. In 'Kamikaze', the flowing effect could also reflect the movement of the Kamikaze plane, as it flies downwards. In 'Poppies', enjambment helps to increase the pace at which the poem is read- it becomes easier and smoother to read. This increases the emotional value of the poem, as the time between the mother and son seems much shorter.
  • Question 5

How do 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' use personal and possessive pronouns (for example, 'I', 'me', 'my') to present a theme.

 

Pick one number out of:

 

1. 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' both use personal and possessive pronouns to present the theme of solitude, which helps the reader to empathise with the main characters of the poem.

 

2. 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess' both use personal and possessive pronouns to emphasise how the Duke and Ozymandias are power-hungry, arrogant and cruel. 

CORRECT ANSWER
2
EDDIE SAYS
Two is the correct answer! The use of personal and possessive pronouns are important in highlighting the personality of a character. In both 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess', pronouns such as 'my' and 'I' are regularly used, which shows the possessive nature and authoritativeness of the Duke and Ozymandias.
  • Question 6

How is 'Ozymandias' similar to 'Exposure'?

 

Pick one option from below. Write the correct number in the text box.

 

1. Both poems use the technique of sibilance. In 'Ozymandias' this sibilance conveys how unpleasant Ozymandias is, through the hissing sound illustrated in "survive, stamped on these lifeless things". In 'Exposure' sibilance could be used to emphasise the freezing cold in "the merciless iced east winds". In both cases, the sibilance extends the sentences and conveys, through unfolding tone and sound, an unpleasant theme.

 

2. Both poems use the technique of personification. In 'Ozymandias' the statue is personified by the quote "which yet survive". In 'Exposure' personification is present in the quote "pale flakes with fingering stealth". This emphasises happens in both poems, as personification is usually used to grant objects human-like qualities.

CORRECT ANSWER
1
EDDIE SAYS
The answer is number one, so well done if you got that right! If not, don't worry! Just remember, both poems do use personification, and the quotes picked out are correct, but the explanation in number two is totally wrong. Both 'Exposure' and 'Ozymandias' actually use personification to heighten the power of nature, making nature intimidating and terrifying.
  • Question 7

How are 'Ozymandias' and 'Tissue' different in the way they present power?

 

Fill out the table below.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This is a tricky one, so well done for having a go! Both poems use the theme of power to highlight the impact it has. The theme, however, differs quite a bit between the two. 'Tissue' presents power as something small, but impactful: paper records (passports, religious books). These have the power to record our histories and change our perceptions of the world. 'Ozymandias', on the other hand, presents the negative effects of power concentrated in one person, through the use of destructive imagery of nature and contrasting ideas.
  • Question 8

Tick the devices which belong to 'Ozymandias' and/or Extract from 'The Prelude'. Some devices are shared by both poems.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
 PersonificationPersonal pronounsNatural imageryRepetitionSibilance
'Ozymandias'
Extract from 'The Prelude'
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully, this table will help you revise the differences and similarities. Remember, differences are important, but so are similarities. Also it's integral that you understand how the differences and similarities are expressed through language, structure and even form so that you can then explain this. The simplest explanation will do- start from there and then you can go into detail and start linking language features to central themes.
  • Question 9

Name another poem where, like 'Ozymandias', there is a semantic field of destruction

 

 

Pick two out of the options below. Write the title in the text-box:

 

'Kamikaze'

'Poppies'

'Storm on the Island'

'Bayonet Charge'

CORRECT ANSWER
Bayonet Charge
'Bayonet Charge'
Storm on the Island
'Storm on the Island'
EDDIE SAYS
Both 'Bayonet Charge' and 'Storm on the Island' use a semantic field of destruction in their poems!
  • Question 10

Last one! A little bit easier, this time.

 

 

Name three language devices which link 'Ozymandias' and 'My Last Duchess'.

CORRECT ANSWER
Metaphor
Personal and possessive pronouns
Theme of arrogance
EDDIE SAYS
Both poems share a range of language devices. Think about how these language devices show similar/different themes! Remember, the semantic field is those multiple words that demonstrate that there's a running theme/motif in the poem. Most poems share a semantic field, you just have to find it! Great focus!
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