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Building Circuits 2

In this worksheet, students will check their understanding of circuits and which materials conduct and insulate electricity.

'Building Circuits 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:  Conductors and Insulators

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Right, what do we know about electricity so far?

 

A circuit carries electrical energy from its source to a device.

 

Overhead cables are carried by large metal pylons.  They are components in the large circuits from the power station to our homes, schools and workplaces.

Pylon

 

Our homes have mains circuits, which carry electricity to every room, and you plug devices into these circuits.

 

Electrical appliances also have smaller circuits inside them.

 

To allow the electricity to flow, the circuit must be a complete loop, with no gaps. Circuits are made using conducting materials (like metal wires) which allow the electricity to flow, and insulating materials (plastics) which stop the flow of electricity.

 

Got that?  Need to read it through again?  Once you're ready, time to check out more about electrical circuits.

Here's a straightforward question to get you started:

 

For electricity to flow, a circuit must be........

 

Pick the correct option from the four listed below.

long

short

a complete loop

insulated

In our homes, we can turn electricity off at the mains switch.

 

Again, choose the best option to complete this sentence:

 

Mains electrical circuits have switches to........

keep us safe

save money

stop electricity escaping

Keisha decides to make a simple switch using kitchen foil, electrical wire and card.

 

Aluminium foil

 

From what you've learned about electricity complete this sentence:

 

The kitchen foil is an electrical......

insulator

conductor

Thinking about the circuit that Keisha is constructing:

 

The insulator in Keisha's switch is the........

wire

card

air

Wires carry electricity to and from Keisha's switch.

 

Pick TWO statements which explain why the wires are covered in plastic?

to stop the electricity leaking out

plastic is an electrical insulator

to keep us safe

to look colourful

Keisha's teacher has brought in a selection of batteries which are different shapes and sizes:

 

Range of batteries

 

Have a think about which TWO of these statements help to explain why batteries are not all the same. 

they provide different amounts of power

they are used in different devices

they are different colours

Here is a toy ladybird.  It is very small (about 2cm long).  When you switch it on, little wheels underneath drive it across the floor.

 

 

Toy ladybird

 

So, the circuit in this toy ladybird is powered by.......

the mains

small batteries

large batteries

Keisha and Jack choose an AA battery to power their circuit. They connect a buzzer and the switch Keisha made earlier into the circuit.

 

Which TWO materials do you think the is buzzer made of?

card

metal

plastic

The metal is used because it is......

colourful

an insulator

a conductor

Plastic is also used to make the buzzer because it is..........

colourful

an insulator

a conductor

  • Question 1

Here's a straightforward question to get you started:

 

For electricity to flow, a circuit must be........

 

Pick the correct option from the four listed below.

CORRECT ANSWER
a complete loop
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, as you'll probably know by now, for electricity to flow there must be no gaps in a complete circuit (like a loop). Air is a bad conductor of electricity, so if there's a gap then the air won't allow the electricity to jump across. Result - nothing!
  • Question 2

In our homes, we can turn electricity off at the mains switch.

 

Again, choose the best option to complete this sentence:

 

Mains electrical circuits have switches to........

CORRECT ANSWER
keep us safe
EDDIE SAYS
As I'm sure you know, electricity can be very dangerous. We must always switch appliances off at the mains before we move them or check them. You don't want to learn this the hard way by getting a nasty electric shock!
  • Question 3

Keisha decides to make a simple switch using kitchen foil, electrical wire and card.

 

Aluminium foil

 

From what you've learned about electricity complete this sentence:

 

The kitchen foil is an electrical......

CORRECT ANSWER
conductor
EDDIE SAYS
Conductors allow electricity to flow though them easily. Metals are good conductors of electricity, which is why most electrical cables contain the metal copper inside them.
  • Question 4

Thinking about the circuit that Keisha is constructing:

 

The insulator in Keisha's switch is the........

CORRECT ANSWER
card
EDDIE SAYS
As you probably remember, insulators stop the flow of electricity. Non-metals are usually INSULATORS, so the card will make a good switch, stopping the electrical current.
  • Question 5

Wires carry electricity to and from Keisha's switch.

 

Pick TWO statements which explain why the wires are covered in plastic?

CORRECT ANSWER
plastic is an electrical insulator
to keep us safe
EDDIE SAYS
To be honest, it's helpful that cables are often coloured, but that's not WHY they're covered in plastic. Because plastic does not conduct electricity, it's safe to use to cover the metal wires. So, insulating materials are used in circuits to keep us safe.
  • Question 6

Keisha's teacher has brought in a selection of batteries which are different shapes and sizes:

 

Range of batteries

 

Have a think about which TWO of these statements help to explain why batteries are not all the same. 

CORRECT ANSWER
they provide different amounts of power
they are used in different devices
EDDIE SAYS
Batteries are used in a wide range of electrical devices; for example, calculator or watch batteries are small, but a car battery, which provides a lot of energy, is large. That means that batteries need to be different sizes not only to fit in different devices but in order to supply the right amount of current.
  • Question 7

Here is a toy ladybird.  It is very small (about 2cm long).  When you switch it on, little wheels underneath drive it across the floor.

 

 

Toy ladybird

 

So, the circuit in this toy ladybird is powered by.......

CORRECT ANSWER
small batteries
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, there are some little button cells inside the base of the toy ladybird which supply the electrical energy to the circuit to make it move.
  • Question 8

Keisha and Jack choose an AA battery to power their circuit. They connect a buzzer and the switch Keisha made earlier into the circuit.

 

Which TWO materials do you think the is buzzer made of?

CORRECT ANSWER
metal
plastic
EDDIE SAYS
The switch is made of card but the buzzer will have a plastic case and the wires inside, that carry the current, will be made of metal.
  • Question 9

The metal is used because it is......

CORRECT ANSWER
a conductor
EDDIE SAYS
You're getting there! For the buzzer to work, it has to have electricity running through it. You need metals for that - that's because they're conductors.
  • Question 10

Plastic is also used to make the buzzer because it is..........

CORRECT ANSWER
an insulator
EDDIE SAYS
Got there! You don't want a little electric shock when you touch a working buzzer, so the body is made of plastic - an insulating material. Well done!
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