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Types of Teeth 1

In this worksheet, students will be looking at different types of teeth and the tasks they perform.

'Types of Teeth 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Animals, including Humans

Curriculum subtopic:   Teeth

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 If you smile at yourself in the mirror, or if you just run your tongue along them, it is obvious that your teeth aren't all the same.

 

You have sharp teeth shaped like little chisels at the front of your mouth. Alongside them are teeth that are more pointed and at the back of your mouth there are some big flat-topped teeth.

 

Mouth

 

So what's good about having all these different teeth? Why not just have a mouth full of little pointy teeth for instance? The type of teeth we have is suited to the type of food we eat. Each tooth type let's us deal with food in different ways. 

 

In this worksheet you can test what you know about your teeth and what they do.

You have all your teeth when you are born. Is that true or false?

true

false

How many sets of teeth does a person have in their lifetime?

1

2

4

teeth keep growing throughout life

How many teeth does a young child have?

20

30

40

How many teeth does an adult have?

28

32

36

Your front teeth, the chisel shaped ones, are called incisors.

 

What do you use them for?

grinding and mashing

tearing

cutting and chopping

Either side of your front teeth are pointed teeth called canines.

 

What are they best suited for?

grinding

chopping

tearing

At the back of your mouth are big flat-topped teeth called molars.

 

What do you think you use these for?

grinding and mashing

chopping and slicing

tearing and shredding

  • Question 1

You have all your teeth when you are born. Is that true or false?

CORRECT ANSWER
false
EDDIE SAYS
Although they are there growing beneath the gums, a baby's first teeth don't become visible until it is 6 to 12 months old.
  • Question 2

How many sets of teeth does a person have in their lifetime?

CORRECT ANSWER
2
EDDIE SAYS
You have two sets of teeth. The first set, called milk teeth, are replaced by your adult teeth between the ages of around 5 to 12.
  • Question 3

How many teeth does a young child have?

CORRECT ANSWER
20
EDDIE SAYS
By around three years old most children have a full set of 20 baby teeth.
  • Question 4

How many teeth does an adult have?

CORRECT ANSWER
32
EDDIE SAYS
By about age 13 most people's baby teeth have been replaced by 28 adult teeth. Between the ages of 17 and 21 four more teeth, called wisdom teeth, grow at the back of the mouth to give a complete adult set of 32 teeth.
  • Question 5

Your front teeth, the chisel shaped ones, are called incisors.

 

What do you use them for?

CORRECT ANSWER
cutting and chopping
EDDIE SAYS
The flat-bladed incisors are best suited for cutting and chopping food.
  • Question 6

Either side of your front teeth are pointed teeth called canines.

 

What are they best suited for?

CORRECT ANSWER
tearing
EDDIE SAYS
The sharp canines are good for gripping and tearing pieces of food.
  • Question 7

At the back of your mouth are big flat-topped teeth called molars.

 

What do you think you use these for?

CORRECT ANSWER
grinding and mashing
EDDIE SAYS
The big molars grind and mash your food into a pulp making it easy to swallow.
---- OR ----

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