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Dangers of Electricity

In this worksheet students have to consider how electricity might represent a danger to them and others and how to operate electrical appliances safely.

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Electricity

Curriculum subtopic:  Common Electrical Appliances

Difficulty level:  

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QUESTION 1 of 10

You use lots of electrical appliances now: TV, games console, battery-operated toys, house lights and so on. In the future you're going to use an awful lot more.

 

However, electricity can be dangerous and so it is important that you know what the dangers are and how to make sure that, when you use electricity, you do so safely.

 

This worksheet will help you to learn some of these important facts.

When experimenting with electricity in your science class it is important not to use mains electricity.

 

Why do you think this is?

it is very expensive

it can make a mess

it could kill you

The light switch in your bathroom is usually operated by pulling on a long string rather than flicking a wall switch as for other rooms.

 

Why do you think this is?

it is easier to hold a string with wet fingers

it stops you touching a switch with wet fingers

it is easier to reach if you're small

Which electrical switches do you think are safe for a child to touch?

none of them

only light switches

all switches

Some devices need a battery to make them work. What will happen if a battery is put in the wrong way round?

the battery will break

the device will not work

the device will explode

Which of these statements about batteries is NOT true?

batteries are safer to use than mains electricity

they will only work if put in the right way round

they are safe for even small children to use

Which one of these things is it safe to do with a battery?

cut it open

put it into a fire

put it into a toy

give it to a small child

Tom has been given a remote-controlled car for his birthday! He puts some batteries into his car, but it doesn't work.

 

 

Which one of these things could NOT be the problem?

the batteries are the wrong way round

the batteries are old

they are the wrong size batteries

the car is broken

the batteries need recharging

  • Question 1

When experimenting with electricity in your science class it is important not to use mains electricity.

 

Why do you think this is?

CORRECT ANSWER
it could kill you
EDDIE SAYS
Mains electricity is very powerful (you will learn that 230 volts comes from the socket) and so we never do experiments with mains electricity in school or at home. If we want to find out about it we use batteries which are much safer (they give about 1.5 volts each).
  • Question 2

The light switch in your bathroom is usually operated by pulling on a long string rather than flicking a wall switch as for other rooms.

 

Why do you think this is?

CORRECT ANSWER
it stops you touching a switch with wet fingers
EDDIE SAYS
Because water can conduct electricity, there is a danger that, with wet fingers, you could become part of the electrical circuit when you touch a wall switch - you don't want that! So, to make sure that that cannot happen you pull on a long (safe) string to turn on the light and that keeps you and the electricity apart.
  • Question 3

Which electrical switches do you think are safe for a child to touch?

CORRECT ANSWER
only light switches
EDDIE SAYS
It would be a bit of a bore if you couldn't turn on the light to your room - it doesn't offer any danger! However, it's all part of your education: knowing when things are safe and when to take extra care. Mains sockets have switches - they are where things are plugged in. You need to learn how to do this carefully as the connectors on the plug are bare and it is possible for you to touch them, which you definitely don't want to do!
  • Question 4

Some devices need a battery to make them work. What will happen if a battery is put in the wrong way round?

CORRECT ANSWER
the device will not work
EDDIE SAYS
The good news is that when you put in the batteries incorrectly it's not a disaster - just annoying! That's because the device simply won't work - nothing explodes or catches fire. Batteries push electricity in a certain direction, so if you put one in the wrong way round, it can't push out any electric current. So the device just doesn't work.
  • Question 5

Which of these statements about batteries is NOT true?

CORRECT ANSWER
they are safe for even small children to use
EDDIE SAYS
They might appear to be safe for small children to use but remember - they're very easy to swallow. Having said that, they are fairly safe objects and simply need to be used with common sense.
  • Question 6

Which one of these things is it safe to do with a battery?

CORRECT ANSWER
put it into a toy
EDDIE SAYS
Batteries contain dangerous chemicals - however, they're safe to use as you are protected from them by the battery's outer case. So, cutting it open or putting it in the fire could result in someone getting hurt. Children can swallow small batteries, so putting them into a toy is fine, as long as that's done by someone who's learned to do it correctly.
  • Question 7

Tom has been given a remote-controlled car for his birthday! He puts some batteries into his car, but it doesn't work.

 

 

Which one of these things could NOT be the problem?

CORRECT ANSWER
they are the wrong size batteries
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, he probably HAS put them in incorrectly - that's the most likely problem. Perhaps they have run down or need recharging, maybe his new car is actually broken but the one thing that cannot be the problem is that the batteries are the wrong size. If that was the case, they won't fit into his car anyway.
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