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Investigating Bouncing Balls

This worksheet tests your ability to carry out an investigation.

'Investigating Bouncing Balls' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Forces

Curriculum subtopic:  Gravity

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet tests your ability to carry out an investigation.

This experiment is about bouncy balls and measuring their bounce.

Some children found out how high a tennis ball bounces on different surfaces. They dropped a tennis ball from a height of 100 cm.

 

Surface Bounce (cm)
Clay 50
Tarmac 56
Concrete 62
Grass 35

 

They carried out a second test. They recorded the height that the same ball bounced to when dropped from different heights onto the same surface. Use the evidence from their two tests to suggest which surface they used for their second investigation.

 

Drop (cm) Bounce (cm)
50 32
100 62
150 88
200 115
grass

tarmac

concrete

clay

Some children found out how high a tennis ball bounces on different surfaces. They dropped a tennis ball from a height of 100 cm.

 

Surface

 

How high ball

bounced (cm)

grass 40
tarmac 51
concrete 61
clay 47

 

They measured how high the ball bounced and recorded their results like this. How did the children present their results?

in a graph

in a bar chart

in a pie chart

in a table

Why did they drop the ball from the same height each time?

You can't be bothered to change the height.

To make the test fair.

The ball bounces too far if the height is too much.

What is the ONE factor they changed as they carried out their investigation?

the ball

the air

the surface

the ruler

  • Question 1

Some children found out how high a tennis ball bounces on different surfaces. They dropped a tennis ball from a height of 100 cm.

 

Surface Bounce (cm)
Clay 50
Tarmac 56
Concrete 62
Grass 35

 

They carried out a second test. They recorded the height that the same ball bounced to when dropped from different heights onto the same surface. Use the evidence from their two tests to suggest which surface they used for their second investigation.

 

Drop (cm) Bounce (cm)
50 32
100 62
150 88
200 115
CORRECT ANSWER
concrete
EDDIE SAYS
The second experiment has data where the ball bounced to the equivalent of 62cm for 100cm start (or equivalent) The surface should be concrete.
  • Question 2

Some children found out how high a tennis ball bounces on different surfaces. They dropped a tennis ball from a height of 100 cm.

 

Surface

 

How high ball

bounced (cm)

grass 40
tarmac 51
concrete 61
clay 47

 

They measured how high the ball bounced and recorded their results like this. How did the children present their results?

CORRECT ANSWER
in a table
EDDIE SAYS
The results shown in the question are in the form of a table. A bar chart would have been equally good. A graph and pie chart are not suitable for this data.
  • Question 3

Why did they drop the ball from the same height each time?

CORRECT ANSWER
To make the test fair.
EDDIE SAYS
If the ball is dropped from different heights then there are two variables operating. Height and surface. One cannot tell which of them is causing an effect.
  • Question 4

What is the ONE factor they changed as they carried out their investigation?

CORRECT ANSWER
the surface
---- OR ----

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