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Rearrange More Than Two Words in a Complex Sentence

In this worksheet, students will rearrange the words in a jumbled sentence so that the sentence makes sense.

'Rearrange More Than Two Words in a Complex Sentence' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:  Jumbled Sentences

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Ready for your next challenge word detective?  

Somebody has been up to their old tricks again, but this time they’ve been moving words!


 

In the sentence below, someone has sneakily jumbled all the words together so that it doesn’t make sense any more.

 

Look at the jumbled sentence below:

purrs my fur when I cat stroke silky her loudly
 

Can you work out how to un-jumble the words so that the sentence makes sense?


First, we need to see if we can group any of the words together.

We can see that my cat and her silky fur go together.


 

Next, we need to look for any verbs and match them with their subjects.

The verbs in the sentence are: purrs and stroke.

Can you match these with the subjects which are: my cat and I?

Did you get my cat purrs and I stroke?

 

Let’s put that together and this gives us:

My cat purrs... I stroke her silky fur.

 

Now, we only have to add the word loudly and join the parts of the sentence with the word when and we have our sentence:

My cat purrs loudly when I stroke her silky fur.

Boy holding a tabby cat


Now it’s your turn to rearrange the words that have been sneakily swapped.

Good luck!

Welcome to an exciting activity of jumbled sentences!
 

Look at this sentence:

 

of chocolates were an in assortment box the there

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

glue model and constructed matchsticks Anna using boat a

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

novel discuss author to an his school visited our 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

school's of member I am a my orchestra 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter, apostrophe and full stop!

You've reached the halfway mark!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

the present ribbon she wrapped a tied carefully around

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

the into mole saw I a ground burrowing quietly 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

a party at snacks the selection of was there 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

rumbled ravenous was she absolutely stomach because she loudly Lydia's

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter, apostrophe and full stop!

Look at this sentence:

 

the heard footsteps I distance shuffle of the in 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

Phew ... you've reached the final question!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

a machine leak the washing repaired plumber the in 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

  • Question 1

Welcome to an exciting activity of jumbled sentences!
 

Look at this sentence:

 

of chocolates were an in assortment box the there

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
There were an assortment of chocolates in the box.
EDDIE SAYS
Hello, word detective - you've got a tricky one to start you off! You might need to write out several possible combinations to find the answer to this one. A good starting point is to look at the two words there were. These will almost certainly go together so if you started with those, you would be on track for working out the rest of the sentence. Give it another try now if you didn't get it correctly un-jumbled first time round.
  • Question 2

Look at this sentence:

 

glue model and constructed matchsticks Anna using boat a

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Anna constructed a model boat using matchsticks and glue.
EDDIE SAYS
Another tricky one! First, find the verb. There are two verbs in this sentence: using and constructed. There's a good chance that Anna is the subject of the sentence so let's try both verbs out with Anna. You get Anna constructed and Anna using - it is clear that the first one is correct, as the second doesn't make sense. So, we have to start: Anna constructed... What did she construct? A model boat - using matchsticks and glue!
Great work detective!
  • Question 3

Look at this sentence:

 

novel discuss author to an his school visited our 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
An author visited our school to discuss his novel.
EDDIE SAYS
OK then, let's start by finding the verb. There are two of them: visited and discuss. The verb discuss needs to have the word to with it, as it is the in the infinitive form. The subject of the sentence is an author so the sentence will start: An author visited... The rest is fairly easy after this point, so long as you remember to add the words to discuss as a pair.
  • Question 4

Look at this sentence:

 

school's of member I am a my orchestra 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter, apostrophe and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
I am a member of my school's orchestra.
EDDIE SAYS
The best starting point for this one is the word school's. Ask yourself what does that apostrophe mean? It means something belongs to the school, so what could be the word following it? It can only be orchestra because it is the only option that fits and it is something that could belong to the school. So the phrase school's orchestra is going to come in the sentence somewhere.
The verb is am so the start of the sentence can only be: I am... Now it should be possible to put the rest of the sentence together. How did you get on?
  • Question 5

You've reached the halfway mark!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

the present ribbon she wrapped a tied carefully around

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
She carefully tied a ribbon around the wrapped present.
EDDIE SAYS
Hard again! What's the verb? This is a tricky one because the word wrapped is a verb but in this sentence it is being used an an adjective to describe the present. If you tried both wrapped and tied with the subject (she), you would be able to see which one would work well. You would be more likely to tie a ribbon than wrap a ribbon so the sentence probably starts: She tied a ribbon carefully...
Once you've got it started, the rest of the sentence becomes much easier doesn't it? What do you tie a ribbon around? ...around the wrapped present!
  • Question 6

Look at this sentence:

 

the into mole saw I a ground burrowing quietly 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in capital letters and a full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
I saw a mole quietly burrowing into the ground.
EDDIE SAYS
Right then - we need to try to match these groups of words. The two verbs are saw and burrowing. Which of these two verbs are most likely to go with I and mole? Almost certainly you will go for I saw and a mole burrowing. Now all you have to do is decide which verb is being described by the adverb quietly, and add the other words to the end of the sentence. And you're there!
  • Question 7

Look at this sentence:

 

a party at snacks the selection of was there 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
There was a selection of snacks at the party.
EDDIE SAYS
Sentences often start with the words there was, so if you see both of these words in a jumbled sentence, it is worth trying them out at the beginning. Then you need to think what the word of could be attached to. It could not be of party or of selection, so it has to be of snacks- hopefully, this helped you to find a selection of snacks.
Are you beginning to get the hang of these now?
  • Question 8

Look at this sentence:

 

rumbled ravenous was she absolutely stomach because she loudly Lydia's

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter, apostrophe and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
Lydia's stomach rumbled loudly because she was absolutely ravenous.
EDDIE SAYS
Firstly, which word is going to go with Lydia's? What is belonging to her? It can only be the word stomach so we have Lydia's stomach. Next, find the verb - it's rumbled. You now have your starting point: Lydia's stomach rumbled... You have more than one clause in this sentence, so you know that the word because is going to be somewhere in the middle to separate them. The rest is relatively easy but it can be confusing in longer sentences to keep track of what you have learned. Remember you can write out different combinations to see which one is correct.
  • Question 9

Look at this sentence:

 

the heard footsteps I distance shuffle of the in 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
I heard the shuffle of footsteps in the distance.
EDDIE SAYS
First, find the verb - it's heard. The subject is going to be I, so the start of the sentence is: I heard... Now, think how to put all those remaining words together to describe what I heard - the shuffle of footsteps in the distance!
  • Question 10

Phew ... you've reached the final question!

 

Look at this sentence:

 

a machine leak the washing repaired plumber the in 

 

It doesn't make sense because the words have been jumbled up.

Write the sentence with the words in their correct places.

 

Remember to put in a capital letter and full stop!

CORRECT ANSWER
A plumber repaired the leak in the washing machine.
EDDIE SAYS
A tricky one to finish with! Let's pair up the words first of all. We have 3 sets: the washing machine, a plumber, the leak. The verb is repaired. How can we put all of these parts together? Well done, word detective - you've done really well with these!
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