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Understand the Significance of Word Order

In this worksheet, students consider how word order affects the meaning of a sentence and a text.

'Understand the Significance of Word Order ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:   Identify Text Meaning

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Sometimes we can change the order of words in a sentence without affecting the meaning.

 

Freddie ran after a stick this morning.

This morning Freddie ran after a stick.

 

Phrases (groups of words) describing the time that something takes place can usually be moved around without changing the meaning of a sentence, but if we move the nouns (people, animals or things) around it can change the meaning completely.

A stick ran after Freddie this morning.

 

In this activity, you can investigate what happens when different parts of a sentence are moved around.

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

I lived in Australia when I was little.

When I was little I lived in Australia.

same meaning

different meaning

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Kerry and Philip played snap in the living room.

Philip and Kerry played snap in the living room.

 

 

same meaning

different meaning

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Philip lent Kerry a pencil.

Kerry lent Philip a pencil.

same meaning

different meaning

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Every Sunday my Dad plays rugby.

My Dad plays rugby every Sunday.

same meaning

different meaning

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Jamie regularly plays tennis after school.

Jamie plays tennis regularly after school.

same meaning

different meaning

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Sarah wore her new dress to school yesterday.

Yesterday Sarah wore her new dress to school.

same meaning

different meaning

This time, rewrite the sentence, beginning with At the zoo.

 

The monkeys were eating peanuts at the zoo.

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with Peter.

 

Every Friday Peter goes to guitar lessons.

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with We.

 

At football training we practised taking penalties.

 

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with In.

 

Road signs are written in English and Welsh in Wales.

 

  • Question 1

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

I lived in Australia when I was little.

When I was little I lived in Australia.

CORRECT ANSWER
same meaning
EDDIE SAYS
Wow, what a beautiful view! Both of these sentences have the same meaning.
  • Question 2

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Kerry and Philip played snap in the living room.

Philip and Kerry played snap in the living room.

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
same meaning
EDDIE SAYS
As they are both doing the same thing it doesn't matter which name comes first.
  • Question 3

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Philip lent Kerry a pencil.

Kerry lent Philip a pencil.

CORRECT ANSWER
different meaning
EDDIE SAYS
This time it does matter which name comes first because the person carrying out the action has changed.
  • Question 4

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Every Sunday my Dad plays rugby.

My Dad plays rugby every Sunday.

CORRECT ANSWER
same meaning
EDDIE SAYS
Both sentences have the same meaning, even though the phrase 'every Sunday' has moved.
  • Question 5

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Jamie regularly plays tennis after school.

Jamie plays tennis regularly after school.

CORRECT ANSWER
same meaning
EDDIE SAYS
Words like 'regularly' can usually be moved into different places.
  • Question 6

Read the two sentences and decide if the second one means the same as the first one.

 

Sarah wore her new dress to school yesterday.

Yesterday Sarah wore her new dress to school.

CORRECT ANSWER
same meaning
EDDIE SAYS
These sentences both have the same meaning, words like 'yesterday' can usually move places.
  • Question 7

This time, rewrite the sentence, beginning with At the zoo.

 

The monkeys were eating peanuts at the zoo.

CORRECT ANSWER
At the zoo the monkeys were eating peanuts.
EDDIE SAYS
This sentence means the same, the phrase 'at the zoo' has just moved places. Did you remember a capital letter?
  • Question 8

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with Peter.

 

Every Friday Peter goes to guitar lessons.

CORRECT ANSWER
Peter goes to guitar lessons every Friday.
EDDIE SAYS
How did you get on? I bet Peter is good with the guitar, if he is learning every Friday!
  • Question 9

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with We.

 

At football training we practised taking penalties.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
We practised taking penalties at football training.
EDDIE SAYS
Both sentences mean the same, the phrases have just changed places.
  • Question 10

Rewrite the sentence, beginning with In.

 

Road signs are written in English and Welsh in Wales.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
In Wales road signs are written in English and Welsh.
EDDIE SAYS
How did you do? Did you use a capital letter and full stop?
---- OR ----

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