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Practise Word Questions

In this worksheet, students will be asked to answer word questions in preparation for the SATs Reading paper.

'Practise Word Questions ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs English

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Word Questions

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Seeing as you have decided to spend some time practising for your SATs reading test, we should first outline what this worksheet entails.

 

In this activity, you will practice how to answer word questions.

What are word questions I hear you ask?

 

- In the SATs reading test, a word question will ask you to give and explain the meaning of a word in the text. 

- Usually, word questions are straightforward to answer and are an easy way to collect marks in the test.

- If you have spent time text marking, you may have already highlighted the word that you are being asked about!

- You may be asked to look at a paragraph to find a word, so make sure you read all of it carefully.

- If you are unsure what a word means, re-read the sentence it is in and the sentences that surround it.

 

Word questions are the main question type in the SATs reading test so by completing this activity, you will be used to them and better prepared for the test.

The questions will be based on comprehension texts about life in Victorian Britain, good luck!

 

 

kids reading books

 

What were houses built from in Victorian times?

 

With the beginning of the railways and new manufacturing processes, previously locally produced building materials became available all over the country. This meant the end of all houses in the local area being built using the same building materials. Houses made of local stone, timber and straw could now, for example, be built of bricks from Bedfordshire and slate from North Wales. The new mass-produced bricks were cheaper and required less preparation and maintenance, so for the first time, all over the country, new mansions, chapels, cottages, barns and factories were made from the same material, irrespective of region.

 

 

Which type of 'processes' meant that Victorians could now transport different building materials all over the country?

What were houses built from in Victorian times?

 

With the beginning of the railways and new manufacturing processes, previously locally produced building materials became available all over the country. This meant the end of all houses in the local area being built using the same building materials. Houses made of local stone, timber and straw could now, for example, be built of bricks from Bedfordshire and slate from North Wales. The new mass-produced bricks were cheaper and required less preparation and maintenance, so for the first time, all over the country, new mansions, chapels, cottages, barns and factories were made from the same material, irrespective of region.

 

 

Which two-word phrase shows that bricks were now able to be made in a large quantity?

How did wealthy Victorians live?

 

Wealthy Victorians favoured villas (not the same as Roman villas), whilst the emerging middle-classes of Victorian England lived in superior terraces with gardens back and front and a room for servants in the attic. Victorian houses were built without garages as there was no need for a place to store a car. Victorian houses also have chimneys because they often had a fireplace in most rooms. The fire was the only way to keep warm. Today, houses are built without chimneys because houses are kept warm via central heating. Most modern houses have radiators in each room instead of a fireplace.

 

Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses:

Bay windows (they stick out)

Iron Railings

Flemish brick bonding

Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks

Stained glass in doorways and windows.

Roofs made of slate.

No garage

Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

 

Which description defines the 'emerging middle-classes' referred to in the passage?

The wealthiest class of people

The most deprived social class

A new social class developing during this time period

The upper class in Victorian society

How did wealthy Victorians live?

 

Wealthy Victorians favoured villas (not the same as Roman villas), whilst the emerging middle-classes of Victorian England lived in superior terraces with gardens back and front and a room for servants in the attic. Victorian houses were built without garages as there was no need for a place to store a car. Victorian houses also have chimneys because they often had a fireplace in most rooms. The fire was the only way to keep warm. Today, houses are built without chimneys because houses are kept warm via central heating. Most modern houses have radiators in each room instead of a fireplace.

 

Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses:

Bay windows (they stick out)

Iron Railings

Flemish brick bonding

Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks

Stained glass in doorways and windows.

Roofs made of slate.

No garage

Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

 

Which word describes the 'key features' of Victorian houses?

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

Copy the word that describes the streets that ran between the poor housing.

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

Can you name one of the terrible diseases that commonly killed poor, Victorian people?

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

What is the name of the houses that were built in 'double rows'?

Housing for the wealthy Victorians.

 

In contrast, the homes for the middle classes and the upper classes were superior. They were better built, larger and most had new gadgets installed, such as flushing toilets, gaslighting, and inside bathrooms. These houses were also decorated in the latest styles. There would be heavy curtains, flowery wallpaper, carpets and rugs, ornaments, well-made furniture, paintings and plants. Most rich people had servants and they would live in the same house, frequently sleeping on the top floor or the attic. Furthermore, the rich had water pumps in their kitchens or sculleries and their waste was taken away down into underground sewers.

 

Can you copy the word for a room, which was used as an overflow kitchen?

 

Housing for the wealthy Victorians.

 

In contrast, the homes for the middle classes and the upper classes were superior. They were better built, larger and most had new gadgets installed, such as flushing toilets, gaslighting, and inside bathrooms. These houses were also decorated in the latest styles. There would be heavy curtains, flowery wallpaper, carpets and rugs, ornaments, well-made furniture, paintings and plants. Most rich people had servants and they would live in the same house, frequently sleeping on the top floor or the attic. Furthermore, the rich had water pumps in their kitchens or sculleries and their waste was taken away down into underground sewers.

 

Can name one of the new inventions that rich Victorians could afford to install in their homes?

Christmas in a wealthy Victorian household

 

The Christmas tree was introduced into England in the early 19th century. In 1841 the German Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, decorated a large Christmas tree at Windsor Castle, reminiscent of his childhood celebrations in Germany (the Christmas tree had been a deep-rooted German tradition since the 18th century). Soon after, it became very fashionable for wealthy Victorians to set up a large tree at Christmas and decorate it with lighted candles, candies, and fancy cakes hung from the branches by ribbon and by paper chains. German settlers had brought this tradition to North America as early as the 17th century and decorated Christmas trees were also the height of fashion in America by the 19th century. 

 

.

 

Find and copy the word from this passage that means 'to remind one of something'.

  • Question 1

What were houses built from in Victorian times?

 

With the beginning of the railways and new manufacturing processes, previously locally produced building materials became available all over the country. This meant the end of all houses in the local area being built using the same building materials. Houses made of local stone, timber and straw could now, for example, be built of bricks from Bedfordshire and slate from North Wales. The new mass-produced bricks were cheaper and required less preparation and maintenance, so for the first time, all over the country, new mansions, chapels, cottages, barns and factories were made from the same material, irrespective of region.

 

 

Which type of 'processes' meant that Victorians could now transport different building materials all over the country?

CORRECT ANSWER
Manufacturing
EDDIE SAYS
New 'manufacturing processes' meant that Victorians could now transport different, locally produced building materials all over the country. It was part of the great industrial revolution in Victorian times and meant all different types of buildings could now be built all over the country. Remember to re-read the text to check you have fully understood it's content. In the SATs reading test, you may be given fictional or non-fictional texts such as this one.
  • Question 2

What were houses built from in Victorian times?

 

With the beginning of the railways and new manufacturing processes, previously locally produced building materials became available all over the country. This meant the end of all houses in the local area being built using the same building materials. Houses made of local stone, timber and straw could now, for example, be built of bricks from Bedfordshire and slate from North Wales. The new mass-produced bricks were cheaper and required less preparation and maintenance, so for the first time, all over the country, new mansions, chapels, cottages, barns and factories were made from the same material, irrespective of region.

 

 

Which two-word phrase shows that bricks were now able to be made in a large quantity?

CORRECT ANSWER
mass-produced
mass produced
EDDIE SAYS
Did you spot that 'mass-produced' means that bricks were now being produced in a large quantity? 'Mass-produced' is an example of the sort of key phrase that you may have already text marked when you first read the text.
  • Question 3

How did wealthy Victorians live?

 

Wealthy Victorians favoured villas (not the same as Roman villas), whilst the emerging middle-classes of Victorian England lived in superior terraces with gardens back and front and a room for servants in the attic. Victorian houses were built without garages as there was no need for a place to store a car. Victorian houses also have chimneys because they often had a fireplace in most rooms. The fire was the only way to keep warm. Today, houses are built without chimneys because houses are kept warm via central heating. Most modern houses have radiators in each room instead of a fireplace.

 

Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses:

Bay windows (they stick out)

Iron Railings

Flemish brick bonding

Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks

Stained glass in doorways and windows.

Roofs made of slate.

No garage

Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

 

Which description defines the 'emerging middle-classes' referred to in the passage?

CORRECT ANSWER
A new social class developing during this time period
EDDIE SAYS
Did you notice that a new social class developing during this time period describes the emerging middle class? To begin with, during the Victorian period there was a rich and a poor social class, nothing in between. Over time, a middle class developed, who sat somewhere between the two in terms of their wealth and housing. Remember to skim through the whole paragraph again when asked to find a particular phrase. Keep going- this is a good start in practising how to answer word questions.
  • Question 4

How did wealthy Victorians live?

 

Wealthy Victorians favoured villas (not the same as Roman villas), whilst the emerging middle-classes of Victorian England lived in superior terraces with gardens back and front and a room for servants in the attic. Victorian houses were built without garages as there was no need for a place to store a car. Victorian houses also have chimneys because they often had a fireplace in most rooms. The fire was the only way to keep warm. Today, houses are built without chimneys because houses are kept warm via central heating. Most modern houses have radiators in each room instead of a fireplace.

 

Typical Characteristics of Victorian houses:

Bay windows (they stick out)

Iron Railings

Flemish brick bonding

Patterns in the brickwork made from coloured bricks

Stained glass in doorways and windows.

Roofs made of slate.

No garage

Sash windows (they open by sliding the window up)

 

Which word describes the 'key features' of Victorian houses?

CORRECT ANSWER
Characteristics
EDDIE SAYS
Is this getting easier? Hopefully, you chose 'characteristics'. 'Characteristics' is another way of saying or a synonym of 'features'; traits that are commonly found in a Victorian property, such as a bay window. When you are answering word questions, you will find that you are expected to understand and explain the meaning of words.
  • Question 5

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

Copy the word that describes the streets that ran between the poor housing.

CORRECT ANSWER
Narrow
EDDIE SAYS
Well spotted if you selected 'narrow'. The streets between Victorian back-to-back houses were extremely narrow, the government did not care to give poor communities gardens access to open space, they preferred to cram as many houses into as small a space as possible, making living conditions terrible. A word question will always challenge you to show that you understand the meaning of words and phrases in the test paper.
  • Question 6

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

Can you name one of the terrible diseases that commonly killed poor, Victorian people?

CORRECT ANSWER
Cholera
Typhus
Smallpox
Dysentery
EDDIE SAYS
Did you manage to find one of the awful diseases? Sadly, for poor, Victorian people, cholera, typhus, smallpox and dysentery were a reality due to their unhygienic living conditions. Even if you hadn't heard of these types of diseases before, hopefully, you could work out what they were as the sentence states that they killed people.
  • Question 7

What was housing like for poor Victorian people?

 

The worker's houses were usually near to the factories so that people could walk to work. They were built really quickly and cheaply. The houses were constructed from terrible quality materials, most had between 2-4 rooms - one or two rooms downstairs, and one or two rooms upstairs. Victorian families were often big with 4 or 5 children. There was no running water or toilet, instead, a whole street would have to share an outdoor pump and a couple of outside toilets.

Most houses in the North of England were "back to backs" (built-in double rows) with no windows at the front, no backyards and a sewer down the middle of the street. The houses were built crammed close together, with very narrow streets between them. Most of the houses were extremely crowded with five or more people possibly crammed into a single room. Most of the new towns were dirty and unhealthy. The household rubbish was thrown out into the streets. Housing conditions like these were perfect breeding grounds for diseases. More than 31,000 people died during an outbreak of cholera in 1832 and lots more were killed by typhus, smallpox and dysentery.

As the houses were so small, there would only have been one living space and perhaps a separate bedroom which was divided into sections by a curtain. Very little furniture was owned as space was limited. Cooking was done on a fireplace in the kitchen - this would also have provided the main source of heating for the house so the family would have spent a lot of time, crammed into this room.

 

What is the name of the houses that were built in 'double rows'?

CORRECT ANSWER
Back-to-backs
EDDIE SAYS
The phrase that shows the poor housing was built in tight, double rows is 'back-to-back.' Not only did this mean no garden, but it also meant no windows at the front and a smelly sewer down the middle of the street. Can you imagine how awful it would be to live like this?
  • Question 8

Housing for the wealthy Victorians.

 

In contrast, the homes for the middle classes and the upper classes were superior. They were better built, larger and most had new gadgets installed, such as flushing toilets, gaslighting, and inside bathrooms. These houses were also decorated in the latest styles. There would be heavy curtains, flowery wallpaper, carpets and rugs, ornaments, well-made furniture, paintings and plants. Most rich people had servants and they would live in the same house, frequently sleeping on the top floor or the attic. Furthermore, the rich had water pumps in their kitchens or sculleries and their waste was taken away down into underground sewers.

 

Can you copy the word for a room, which was used as an overflow kitchen?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
sculleries
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully, by carefully reading the passage, you have realised 'sculleries' is another word for an 'overflow kitchen'. Wealthy Victorians would have had a scullery that was used for washing dishes or laundering clothes.
  • Question 9

Housing for the wealthy Victorians.

 

In contrast, the homes for the middle classes and the upper classes were superior. They were better built, larger and most had new gadgets installed, such as flushing toilets, gaslighting, and inside bathrooms. These houses were also decorated in the latest styles. There would be heavy curtains, flowery wallpaper, carpets and rugs, ornaments, well-made furniture, paintings and plants. Most rich people had servants and they would live in the same house, frequently sleeping on the top floor or the attic. Furthermore, the rich had water pumps in their kitchens or sculleries and their waste was taken away down into underground sewers.

 

Can name one of the new inventions that rich Victorians could afford to install in their homes?

CORRECT ANSWER
Flushing Toilets
Gaslighting
Inside bathrooms
EDDIE SAYS
Did you read the question carefully? There were three key 'inventions' that the wealthy Victorians could afford to install into their homes: flushing toilets, gaslighting and inside bathrooms.
  • Question 10

Christmas in a wealthy Victorian household

 

The Christmas tree was introduced into England in the early 19th century. In 1841 the German Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, decorated a large Christmas tree at Windsor Castle, reminiscent of his childhood celebrations in Germany (the Christmas tree had been a deep-rooted German tradition since the 18th century). Soon after, it became very fashionable for wealthy Victorians to set up a large tree at Christmas and decorate it with lighted candles, candies, and fancy cakes hung from the branches by ribbon and by paper chains. German settlers had brought this tradition to North America as early as the 17th century and decorated Christmas trees were also the height of fashion in America by the 19th century. 

 

.

 

Find and copy the word from this passage that means 'to remind one of something'.

CORRECT ANSWER
reminiscent
EDDIE SAYS
The word which means 'to remind one of something' is "reminiscent". The Christmas tree was 'reminiscent' of Prince Albert's childhood celebrations in Germany. Over time, fortunately, it became more affordable for many members of society to celebrate by having a tree. Fantastic work! You've completed another activity and are now even more prepared for the SATs reading paper.
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