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Compare Two Poems: 'Wind on the Hill' and 'The Wind Begun ...'

In this worksheet, students compare and contrast two poems about the wind by A.A. Milne and Emily Dickinson.

'Compare Two Poems: 'Wind on the Hill' and 'The Wind Begun ...'' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:  Make Comparisons of Texts

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Many poems have been written about the weather. In this worksheet you can read two very different poems about the wind and think about how the poets have treated their subject.

 

The first poem is by A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh.

 

 

**********************

 

Wind on the hill

 

No one can tell me,
Nobody knows,
Where the wind comes from,
Where the wind goes.
 
It's flying from somewhere
As fast as it can,
I couldn't keep up with it,
Not if I ran.
 
But if I stopped holding
The string of my kite,
It would blow with the wind
For a day and a night.
 
And then when I found it,
Wherever it blew,
I should know that the wind
Had been going there too.
 
So then I could tell them
Where the wind goes...
But where the wind comes from
Nobody knows.

 

**********************

 

 

The second poem is by Emily Dickinson, a 19th Century American poet.

 

 

**********************

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass
With threatening Tunes and low,
He flung a Menace at the Earth,
A Menace at the Sky.
 
The Leaves unhooked themselves from Trees
And started all abroad;
The Dust did scoop itself like Hands
And throw away the Road.
 
The Wagons quickened on the Streets,
The Thunder hurried slow;
The Lightning showed a Yellow Beak,
And then a livid Claw.
 
The Birds put up the Bars to Nests,
The Cattle fled to Barns;
There came one drop of Giant Rain,
And then, as if the Hands
 
That held the Dams had parted hold,
The Waters Wrecked the Sky,
But overlooked my Father’s House,
Just quartering a Tree.

 

**********************

The first four questions relate to the A.A. Milne poem.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

Although A.A. Milne wrote this poem when he was an adult, do you think it is written from the point of view of an adult or a child?

adult

child

Which of the following statements best sums up the speaker's feelings towards the wind?

The speaker loves the wind.

The speaker hates the wind.

The speaker is frightened of the wind.

The speaker is interested in the wind.

Which of the following poetic devices does A.A. Milne use in his poem? Tick two boxes.

rhyme

onomatopoeia

repetition

simile

A.A. Milne makes the wind seem like a living thing in this poem. Which of the following lines suggests that the wind is alive?

Where the wind comes from

It's flying from somewhere

Wherever it blew

Where the wind goes

The next four questions relate to Emily Dickinson's poem.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

How would you sum up what the poem is about?

The poet is describing the coming of a huge storm.

The poet is describing her fear of the wind.

The poet is describing how much she loves the wind.

Emily Dickinson was well-known for her unusual use of capital letters. We don't know for certain why she did this, but what effect does it have on her poems?

It shows where she is changing the subject.

It makes certain words stand out.

It breaks the verses up into separate parts.

Which of the following poetic devices is used most in this poem?

rhyme

alliteration

personification

onomatopoeia

simile

Read the first two lines of the poem again.

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

With threatening Tunes and low

 

This opening sets the atmosphere of the poem. The wind is compared to a person rocking a cradle, but instead of singing gentle lullabies it is is singing 'threatening' tunes.

 

What do you think the word 'menace' refers to in the next two lines?

He threw a Menace at the Earth

A Menace at the Sky

the wind

the rain

the storm

Look at the following adjectives and decide which ones could be used to describe the wind in each of the two poems.

 MilneDickinson
playful
fierce
angry
dangerous
mischievous
destructive
violent
mysterious

Poems are written for many different reasons and you may have enjoyed one of these poems more than the other.

 

We cannot be sure what was in the poets' minds when they wrote these poems, but what do you think are the likely reasons?

 MilneDickinson
to entertain a child
to describe a real event
to express relief after a frightening event
to show how a child may view the natural world
  • Question 1

The first four questions relate to the A.A. Milne poem.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

Although A.A. Milne wrote this poem when he was an adult, do you think it is written from the point of view of an adult or a child?

CORRECT ANSWER
child
EDDIE SAYS
When answering questions about a text it helps to read the text trhough several times. Make sure you have done this. The poem is written as if a child is speaking. One clue is the mention of flying a kite and running after it to find out where the wind has gone.
  • Question 2

Which of the following statements best sums up the speaker's feelings towards the wind?

CORRECT ANSWER
The speaker is interested in the wind.
EDDIE SAYS
Look back at the poem. What is the feeling you have been given? There is no evidence in the poem that the speaker is afraid of the wind. He or she is interested in where the wind comes from and where it goes.
  • Question 3

Which of the following poetic devices does A.A. Milne use in his poem? Tick two boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
rhyme
repetition
EDDIE SAYS
The second and fourth lines of each verse rhyme. There is repetition of the phrases 'where the wind comes from' and 'where the wind goes'. Keep up the great effort!
  • Question 4

A.A. Milne makes the wind seem like a living thing in this poem. Which of the following lines suggests that the wind is alive?

CORRECT ANSWER
It's flying from somewhere
EDDIE SAYS
Excellent effort! The wind does not really fly, and the choice of the word 'flying' creates the impression that the wind is a living creature.
  • Question 5

The next four questions relate to Emily Dickinson's poem.

 

Remember that you can look back at the poem as often as you like by clicking on the Help button.

 

How would you sum up what the poem is about?

CORRECT ANSWER
The poet is describing the coming of a huge storm.
EDDIE SAYS
The poem describes the coming of a violent storm. The narrator may well have been afraid of the storm but the emphasis is on the description of its approach and its effects on her surroundings.
  • Question 6

Emily Dickinson was well-known for her unusual use of capital letters. We don't know for certain why she did this, but what effect does it have on her poems?

CORRECT ANSWER
It makes certain words stand out.
EDDIE SAYS
Most of the words she has capitalised are nouns, and the effect is to make them stand out on the page and draw our attention to them.
  • Question 7

Which of the following poetic devices is used most in this poem?

CORRECT ANSWER
personification
EDDIE SAYS
Personification means giving human qualities to non-living things. In this poem the wind is referred to as 'he' and is rocking the grass and throwing things at the earth. The leaves are unhooking themselves from the trees and the dust is throwing away the road.
  • Question 8

Read the first two lines of the poem again.

 

The Wind begun to rock the Grass

With threatening Tunes and low

 

This opening sets the atmosphere of the poem. The wind is compared to a person rocking a cradle, but instead of singing gentle lullabies it is is singing 'threatening' tunes.

 

What do you think the word 'menace' refers to in the next two lines?

He threw a Menace at the Earth

A Menace at the Sky

CORRECT ANSWER
the storm
EDDIE SAYS
High five! The word refers to the whole storm, which the wind is accused of starting. The word 'menace' means something that is threatening or is likely to cause harm.
  • Question 9

Look at the following adjectives and decide which ones could be used to describe the wind in each of the two poems.

CORRECT ANSWER
 MilneDickinson
playful
fierce
angry
dangerous
mischievous
destructive
violent
mysterious
EDDIE SAYS
The wind could be described as 'mysterious' in the Milne poem because the speaker doesn't know where it comes from.
  • Question 10

Poems are written for many different reasons and you may have enjoyed one of these poems more than the other.

 

We cannot be sure what was in the poets' minds when they wrote these poems, but what do you think are the likely reasons?

CORRECT ANSWER
 MilneDickinson
to entertain a child
to describe a real event
to express relief after a frightening event
to show how a child may view the natural world
EDDIE SAYS
These are just suggestions, but the storm described by Emily Dickinson may have really taken place and she may have written the poem because she was relieved that her father's house wasn't damaged. Great effort!
---- OR ----

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