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Use Homophones and Other Words that are Easily Confused

In this worksheet, students will learn the difference in meaning between various homophones and, how to use them correctly in their own writing.

'Use Homophones and Other Words that are Easily Confused' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Reading: Word Reading

Curriculum subtopic:   Root Word Awareness

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What are homophones?

 

Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings. For example:

tail   and, tale   

 

Homophones are sometimes spelt differently, for example:

'I' (referring to oneself) and 'eye' (body part) 

Groan (to moan) and grown (to increase in size)

Wait (the verb) and weight (how heavy something is)

 

It is important to learn and be able to spell a variety of homophones.

Learning homophones will improve your spelling and increase your range of vocabulary.

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

Would you like a piece/peace of cake?

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

You can here/hear the birds twittering early in the morning.

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

Who nose/knows what will happen next?

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

Below is a sentence that contains a homophone.

The homophone is in bold type.

 

Can you write in the box the alternative homophone?

 

He let out an enormous groan when he was asked to do his homework.

Below is a sentence that contains a homophone.

The homophone is in bold type.

 

Can you write in the box the alternative homophone?

 

The postman called in earlier to deliver our mail.

Look carefully at the homophones below, can you write the alternative homophone for each one?

Look carefully at the homophones below, can you write the alternative homophone for each one?

  • Question 1

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

Would you like a piece/peace of cake?

CORRECT ANSWER
piece
EDDIE SAYS
How did you find this first question? The correct homophone in this sentence is 'piece'. The other use of 'peace' is relevant when we are describing a time or place of tranquillity.
  • Question 2

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

You can here/hear the birds twittering early in the morning.

CORRECT ANSWER
hear
EDDIE SAYS
How did you get on this time? The correct homophone in this sentence is 'hear'. The other use of 'here' is relevant we are describing a place or position.
  • Question 3

Read the sentence below carefully.

 

Then, type into the box the correct homophone.

 

Who nose/knows what will happen next?

CORRECT ANSWER
knows
EDDIE SAYS
I bet you are getting the hang of this now! The correct homophone in this sentence is 'knows'. The other use, 'nose' is applicable only when we are describing the body part on our face! Don't worry if you are finding this tricky, we have more questions to tackle together.
  • Question 4

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
You need to insert the homophone 'there' in order to show the command is referring to a place to put your coat.
  • Question 5

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This time, you need to insert the homophone 'their' in order to show the statement is referring to a belonging, their heads!
  • Question 6

One set of homophones that can cause confusion is:

 

Their (belonging to them)

There (adverb of place)

They're (they are)

 

In the sentence below, can you insert the correct homophone from this set?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
For this question, you need to insert the homophone 'they're' in order to show the statement is missing the contraction, 'they are'. Hopefully, you're beginning to feel more confident!
  • Question 7

Below is a sentence that contains a homophone.

The homophone is in bold type.

 

Can you write in the box the alternative homophone?

 

He let out an enormous groan when he was asked to do his homework.

CORRECT ANSWER
grown
EDDIE SAYS
The alternative homophone for 'groan' (meaning to moan) is 'grown', meaning to increase in size or get bigger.
  • Question 8

Below is a sentence that contains a homophone.

The homophone is in bold type.

 

Can you write in the box the alternative homophone?

 

The postman called in earlier to deliver our mail.

CORRECT ANSWER
male
EDDIE SAYS
The alternative homophone for 'mail' (letters and parcels sent by post) is 'male' (denoting the sex of a mammal or plant).
  • Question 9

Look carefully at the homophones below, can you write the alternative homophone for each one?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
There were a lot of homophones to match up this time! The matching homophone pairs are: Reigned and rained Blue and blew Read and red Choose and chews For and four Eight and ate
  • Question 10

Look carefully at the homophones below, can you write the alternative homophone for each one?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Again, there were a lot of homophones to match up this time! The matching homophone pairs are: Know and no Cell and sell Deer and dear Bare and bear Bean and been Ball and bawl Phew! Those last two questions required great focus but you did it! Why not take a break before attempting another activity?
---- OR ----

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