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Practise Descriptive Writing Techniques

In this worksheet, students will revise those descriptive writing techniques that will strengthen their own work.

'Practise Descriptive Writing Techniques' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:   Writing

Curriculum subtopic:   Use Growing Knowledge to Support Writing

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet will allow you to revise techniques that will strengthen and enrich your writing.

Look at the two excerpts below:

 

1. "The sky was blue, the grass was green, Amy felt happy."

 

2. "The sun sat high in the azure sky, a bright ball of light. Amy lay on the grass, her bare feet resting on her sister's back. It was the little things that made her feel at peace."

 

 

Which text set the scene and took you, the reader, there in your mind? The second, right?

This is how we want to better your own writing, through vivid description and a wide range of adjectives.

 

Now, it's over to you.

 

Is the following statement true or false?

 

Descriptive writing is the same as writing a story; it must have a narrative.

True

False

A piece of descriptive writing does not need to tell a story. It merely describes a place, person or event. As a student, you should be able to use language that helps the reader imagine that they are at the scene that's being described.

 

From the list below, choose five techniques you would want to include in a good piece of descriptive writing.

The five senses

Rhetorical question

Simile

Metaphor

Facts and figures

Personification

Rule of three

A range of adjectives and adverbs

What is this an example of?

 

The sky was as grey as slate, the rain fell down like needles quickly filling the puddles.

Metaphor

Personification

Simile

What is this an example of?

 

The sea's fingers clawed at the beach dragging piles of sand and shells into its frothy mouth.

Simile

Metaphor

Personification

What is this an example of?

 

The candyfloss clouds bobbed about on the satin silk blue sky.

Simile

Metaphor

Personification

What kind of word do we use when we want to describe sounds?

Alliteration

Onomatopoeia

Rhyme

Which onomatopoeia words might you use to describe a busy restaurant kitchen?

 

Select four from the list below.

Clatter

Sizzle

Purr

Swoosh

Bang

Whoosh

Hum

Splash

When describing what something looks like, colour is important. You need to try and use a variety of words for this.

 

From the list below, select the words that are a shade of red.

Ruby

Scarlet

Crimson

Turquoise

Cherry

Peach

Select the words below that are shades of the colour blue.

Azure

Sapphire

Lilac

Cyan

Rose

Cobalt

What does an adjective describe?

Noun

Verb

What does an adverb describe and what letters do they often end in?

Noun

Verb

-er

-ly

Do you need to plan a piece of descriptive writing?

Yes, it is important to structure your writing.

No, there is no story to it, so it is better to just go with your inspiration as you write.

One way to plan your descriptive writing is to write a paragraph for each of the five senses.

 

What are the five senses?

Hearing

Smell

Ideas

Sight

Emotions

Taste

Touch

If you were asked to describe a train journey, below are some of the ideas you could include. Match the correct idea with the corresponding sense.

Column A

Column B

'Rhythmic clatter of the train'
Sight
'Stale smoke'
Hearing
'City suburbs'
Touch
'Bitter coffee'
Taste
'Soft fabric seats'
Smell

A different way to plan your descriptive writing is to use the zoom-in technique. Like a camera, slowly zoom in on the person, object or scene you're describing from big to small.

For example: you might describe a street, then a house, then a doorway and finally a cat, sitting in the doorway.

 

If you were describing a beach scene and zooming in, in what order would you describe the following things from big to small?

Column A

Column B

1
The whole bay
2
A child building a sandcastle
3
A small stretch of sand
4
A family sitting under a sun umbrella
5
The shells on the sandcastle
  • Question 1

Is the following statement true or false?

 

Descriptive writing is the same as writing a story; it must have a narrative.

CORRECT ANSWER
False
EDDIE SAYS
It is false. Descriptive writing does not need to have a narrative, that is a story.
  • Question 2

A piece of descriptive writing does not need to tell a story. It merely describes a place, person or event. As a student, you should be able to use language that helps the reader imagine that they are at the scene that's being described.

 

From the list below, choose five techniques you would want to include in a good piece of descriptive writing.

CORRECT ANSWER
The five senses
Simile
Metaphor
Personification
A range of adjectives and adverbs
EDDIE SAYS
In a good piece of descriptive writing, you would expect to find: description that uses the five senses, simile, metaphor, personification and a range of adjectives and adverbs.
  • Question 3

What is this an example of?

 

The sky was as grey as slate, the rain fell down like needles quickly filling the puddles.

CORRECT ANSWER
Simile
EDDIE SAYS
The sentence employs simile because it compares the sky to slate and rain to needles.
  • Question 4

What is this an example of?

 

The sea's fingers clawed at the beach dragging piles of sand and shells into its frothy mouth.

CORRECT ANSWER
Personification
EDDIE SAYS
This is an example of personification because it gives human qualities to the sea.
  • Question 5

What is this an example of?

 

The candyfloss clouds bobbed about on the satin silk blue sky.

CORRECT ANSWER
Metaphor
EDDIE SAYS
This sentence contains an example of metaphor as it describes the clouds and sky as if they are candyfloss clouds and satin.
  • Question 6

What kind of word do we use when we want to describe sounds?

CORRECT ANSWER
Onomatopoeia
EDDIE SAYS
We use Onomatopoeia when describing sounds. They phonetically resemble the sound being described, such as 'cuckoo'.
  • Question 7

Which onomatopoeia words might you use to describe a busy restaurant kitchen?

 

Select four from the list below.

CORRECT ANSWER
Clatter
Sizzle
Bang
Splash
EDDIE SAYS
You may hear the sounds: clatter, sizzle, bang and splash. By now you should be feeling more confident!
  • Question 8

When describing what something looks like, colour is important. You need to try and use a variety of words for this.

 

From the list below, select the words that are a shade of red.

CORRECT ANSWER
Ruby
Scarlet
Crimson
Cherry
EDDIE SAYS
Ruby, scarlet, crimson and cherry are all varying shades of red. They will make your writing sound more sophisticated rather than simply using the word 'red'.
  • Question 9

Select the words below that are shades of the colour blue.

CORRECT ANSWER
Azure
Sapphire
Cyan
Cobalt
EDDIE SAYS
Azure, sapphire, cyan and cobalt are all different kinds of blue. Why not add one of these into some of your own descriptive writing to really grab the reader?
  • Question 10

What does an adjective describe?

CORRECT ANSWER
Noun
EDDIE SAYS
An adjective describes a noun. For example: She loved her new green football trainers. In this sentence, the noun is the girl's football trainers (the thing) and green is the adjective used to describe them.
  • Question 11

What does an adverb describe and what letters do they often end in?

CORRECT ANSWER
Verb
-ly
EDDIE SAYS
An adverb describes a verb and ends in the letters -ly. For example: quickly
  • Question 12

Do you need to plan a piece of descriptive writing?

CORRECT ANSWER
Yes, it is important to structure your writing.
EDDIE SAYS
Even though descriptive writing doesn't have to have a narrative, you still need to plan in order to adequately structure your ideas.
  • Question 13

One way to plan your descriptive writing is to write a paragraph for each of the five senses.

 

What are the five senses?

CORRECT ANSWER
Hearing
Smell
Sight
Taste
Touch
EDDIE SAYS
The five senses are hearing, smell, sight, taste, touch.
  • Question 14

If you were asked to describe a train journey, below are some of the ideas you could include. Match the correct idea with the corresponding sense.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

'Rhythmic clatter of the train'
Hearing
'Stale smoke'
Smell
'City suburbs'
Sight
'Bitter coffee'
Taste
'Soft fabric seats'
Touch
EDDIE SAYS
'Rhythmic clatter of the train' = hearing 'Stale smoke' = smell 'City suburbs' = sight 'Bitter coffee' = taste 'Soft fabric seats' = touch In describing sensory experiences you will enrich your writing and take the reader to the scene you're painting with your words.
  • Question 15

A different way to plan your descriptive writing is to use the zoom-in technique. Like a camera, slowly zoom in on the person, object or scene you're describing from big to small.

For example: you might describe a street, then a house, then a doorway and finally a cat, sitting in the doorway.

 

If you were describing a beach scene and zooming in, in what order would you describe the following things from big to small?

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

1
The whole bay
2
A small stretch of sand
3
A family sitting under a sun umbr...
4
A child building a sandcastle
5
The shells on the sandcastle
EDDIE SAYS
When depicting a scene you can zoom in closer and closer, describing a paragraph for each. 1) The whole bay 2) A small stretch of sand 3) A family under the sun umbrella 4) A child building a sandcastle 5) The shells on the sandcastle Phew! That was a lengthy activity but you got through it. Why not take a break before tacking the next worksheet?
---- OR ----

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