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GCSE Practice Paper in the style of AQA English Literature Paper 1

GCSE Practice Paper in the style of AQA English Literature Paper 1

'GCSE Practice Paper in the style of AQA English Literature Paper 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   English Literature

GCSE Boards:   AQA

Curriculum topic:   GCSE Sample Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:   Paper 1

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a practice GCSE English Literature Paper 1 in the style of AQA.

 

In the GCSE examination, you may complete your answers in a written answer booklet or on a computer. At EdPlace, you will type your answers manually into onscreen boxes and use marking criteria to grade your answers afterwards.

 

The time is set for 1 hour and 45 minutes (105 minutes) but you can keep working once the timer has run out. You are advised to spend roughly forty-five minutes on each section (A and B) and allow fifteen minutes to check your answers.

 

IMPORTANT: This question paper contains all text choices. Although there are 13 questions in the paper, you will only need to answer two: one from Section A (Q1 - 7) and one from Section B (Q8 - 13). Use the contents page (located on the first page) to work out which questions you need. You can return to check it at any time. Once you have finished your answers and checked them through, go back to the contents page and check the box to complete the assessment. 

 

GCSE

ENGLISH LITERATURE

Paper 1 - Shakespeare and the 19th-century novel

 

Time allowed: 1 hour and 45 minutes

 

Instructions

You must answer the questions in the spaces provided.

Answer one question from Section A and one question from Section B.

You must not use a dictionary.

 

Information

The maximum marks for questions are shown in brackets

The maximum mark for this paper is 64.

AO4 will be assessed in Section A. There are four marks available for AO4 in Section A in addition to 30 marks for answering the question. AO4 assesses the following skills: Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

There are 30 marks for Section B.

 

 

 

Disclaimer:

We have no affiliation to AQA and these questions represent our own unique content developed by EdPlace GCSE authors.

None of the content displayed here has been supplied by AQA or any other third party suppliers.

CONTENTS 

 

Section A - Shakespeare

 

Q2 - Macbeth
Q3 - Romeo and Juliet
Q4 - The Tempest
Q5 - The Merchant of Venice
Q6 - Much Ado About Nothing
Q7 - Julius Caesar

 

 

Section B - 19th-century novel

 

Q8 - The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
Q9 - A Christmas CarolCharles Dickens
Q10 - Great ExpectationsCharles Dickens
Q11 - Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë
Q12 - Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
Q13 - Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
Q14 - The Sign of Four, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

 

I've completed one question for Section A and one question for Section B, and checked my answers.


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Either

 

Question 1: Macbeth

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 2 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Macbeth has just murdered King Duncan and is badly shaken by what he has done. Lady Macbeth tries to calm in down but does not do much to reassure him.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents guilt.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents guilt in this extract and how Shakespeare presents guilt in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 2: Romeo and Juliet

 

Read the following extract from Act 1, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio are on their way to the Capulet feast in disguise. Romeo is missing Rosaline and Mercutio teases him for it.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents the attitudes of Romeo and Mercutio towards love.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents the attitudes of Romeo and Mercutio towards love in this extract and how Shakespeare presents their attitudes towards love in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 3: The Tempest

 

Read the following extract from Act 3, Scene 1 of The Tempest and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Ferdinand is Prospero's prisoners and Miranda has stepped in to help him with the chores he has been set. They are getting to know one another as she works.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents Miranda.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents Miranda in this extract and how Shakespeare presents Miranda in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 4: The Merchant of Venice

 

Read the following extract from Act 3, Scene 1 of The Merchant of Venice and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Salarino and Shylock are discussing Jessica's elopement and rumours of Antonio's losses at sea. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents prejudice.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents prejudice in this extract and how Shakespeare presents prejudice in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 5: Much Ado About Nothing

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 2 of Much Ado About Nothing and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Don Jon has learnt about the upcoming marriage of Claudio and Hero and wishes he could prevent it. His servant, Boracio, has devised a plan to put a stop to the wedding. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents revenge.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents revenge in this extract and how Shakespeare presents revenge in the play as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 


 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 6: Julius Caesar

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 1 of Julius Caesar and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Portia is worried about her husband's well-being. She tries to convince Brutus to share his worries. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents Brutus.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents Brutus in this extract and how Shakespeare presents Brutus in the play as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Either

 

Question 7: Robert Louis Stevenson - The Strange Case of  Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 4 of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Remarkable Incident of Dr Lanyon) and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Utterson has gone to visit Dr Lanyon after the death of their acquaintance, Sir Danvers Carew.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Stevenson creates suspicion around Dr Jekyll.

 

Write about how Stevenson presents suspicion in this extract and how Stevenson presents suspicion in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 8: Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 1 (Stave 1) of A Christmas Carol and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by the ghost of his former business partner, Jacob Marley.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Dickens builds suspense.

 

Write about how Dickens builds suspense in this extract and how Dickens builds suspense in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 9: Charles Dickens - Great Expectations

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 8 of Great Expectations and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Pip has gone to Satis House. Here, he meets Miss Havisham for the first time.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Dickens presents women.

 

Write about how Dickens presents women in this extract and how Dickens presents women in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 10: Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 2 of Jane Eyre and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Miss Abbott and Bessie Lee lock Jane Eyre in the Red Room as punishment for fighting with her cousin.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Brontë uses setting to build tension.

 

Write about how Brontë uses setting to build tension in this extract and how Brontë uses setting to build tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 11: Mary Shelley - Frankenstein

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 20 of Frankenstein and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Dr Frankenstein has just destroyed the monster's companion. He had promised the monster he would make one but feared the consequences of creating another creature.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Shelley builds tension.

 

Write about how Shelley builds tension in this extract and how Shelley builds tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 12: Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 3 of Pride and Prejudice and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, the reader is first introduced to Mr Bingley, a wealthy young gentleman who has rented a property in the local area.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Austen presents Mr Bingley.

 

Write about how Austen presents Mr Bingley in this extract and how Austen presents Mr Bingley in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 


 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 13: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - The Sign of Four

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 3 (In Quest of a Solution) of The Sign of Four and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract,Holmes and Watson discuss Major Shalto's death.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension.

 

Write about how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension in this extract and how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

  • Question 1

CONTENTS 

 

Section A - Shakespeare

 

Q2 - Macbeth
Q3 - Romeo and Juliet
Q4 - The Tempest
Q5 - The Merchant of Venice
Q6 - Much Ado About Nothing
Q7 - Julius Caesar

 

 

Section B - 19th-century novel

 

Q8 - The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
Q9 - A Christmas CarolCharles Dickens
Q10 - Great ExpectationsCharles Dickens
Q11 - Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë
Q12 - Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
Q13 - Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
Q14 - The Sign of Four, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
I've completed one question for Section A and one question for Section B, and checked my answers.
EDDIE SAYS
Well done. You've completed a practice GCSE English Literature Paper 1 in the style of AQA.
  • Question 2

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Either

 

Question 1: Macbeth

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 2 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Macbeth has just murdered King Duncan and is badly shaken by what he has done. Lady Macbeth tries to calm in down but does not do much to reassure him.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents guilt.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents guilt in this extract and how Shakespeare presents guilt in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Shakespeare presents guilt as something that is perceived differently by both characters in this scene. For Macbeth, it is something that haunts him and keeps him awake at night. He describes how he ‘heard a voice cry ‘Sleep no more’’. This suggests that Macbeth feels that the guilt is out of his control since it is represented by a ‘voice’ that is separate to him and it works against his wishes by demanding he ‘Sleep no more’). Furthermore, the use of an imperative command suggests that Macbeth feels he has no choice but to obey this ‘voice’. In a sense, this presents him as thinking he is a victim of guilt because it is pursuing him in this way. Here, Shakespeare presents guilt as linked also to madness because Macbeth is hearing voices and experiencing troubled sleep which are both symptoms associated with dissociative personality disorders. This draws on ideas linked to the wider context of Shakespearean society. In Jacobean and Elizabethan society, Madness was often associated with dark spirits and, rather than use talking therapies as we do today, religious figures were often brought in to assist with patients who were deemed ‘mad’. Moreover, the perceived ‘madness’ of royal figures is a theme that has since been explored by other famous playwrights including Alan Bennett who wrote about ‘The Madness of King George’.
  • Question 3

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 2: Romeo and Juliet

 

Read the following extract from Act 1, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio are on their way to the Capulet feast in disguise. Romeo is missing Rosaline and Mercutio teases him for it.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents the attitudes of Romeo and Mercutio towards love.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents the attitudes of Romeo and Mercutio towards love in this extract and how Shakespeare presents their attitudes towards love in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to the wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Shakespeare presents love as something that is perceived differently by both characters in this scene. For Romeo, love is something that hurts him. He describes how love ‘pricks like a thorn’. This simile suggests that Romeo sees himself as a victim of love because it can cause him pain. He supports this view of love when he presents it as intimidating and aggressive by using the adjectival phrases ‘too rough’, ‘too rude’ and ‘too boisterous’. The repetition of the word ‘too’ implies that love is ‘too’ much to bear for Romeo and he is powerless to it. However, for Mercutio, love is something that can be manipulated and controlled. He instructs Romeo, ‘If love be rough with you, be rough with love’. Here, Mercutio presents love as something equal to himself since the repetition of the imperative phrase ‘be rough’ shows both he and love are capable of it. Unlike Romeo, he doesn’t see himself as a victim of love. This is an example of Shakespeare foreshadowing later events in the play. It is precisely because he and Juliet are victims of their love and do not see it as something they are in control of that they concoct their plan with Friar Lawrence that goes so wrong. Mercutio’s views here are more closely linked to Elizabethan society where marriage and love were usually contractual events between families, particularly for those in nobility. The proposed wedding between Paris and Juliet occurring in Act 1, Scene 2 is a more accurate example of approaches to marriage at this time.
  • Question 4

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 3: The Tempest

 

Read the following extract from Act 3, Scene 1 of The Tempest and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Ferdinand is Prospero's prisoners and Miranda has stepped in to help him with the chores he has been set. They are getting to know one another as she works.

 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents Miranda.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents Miranda in this extract and how Shakespeare presents Miranda in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Shakespeare presents Miranda’s identity as conflicted in this scene. On the one hand, she is someone who is controlled by her father and lives a life of strict rules. Shakespeare describes Miranda’s upset after spontaneously telling Ferdinand her name. He writes: ‘O my father, / I have broke your hest to say so’. Here, she shows that she knows her father will be disappointed with her which suggests that her life on the island is not a free one where she can make her own decisions. The structure of ‘O my father’ is very similar to the opening of a prayer and presents Prospero here as an all-knowing and all-powerful god, that Miranda is a subject of. Even when he is not with her, she feels compelled to remain loyal to him at all times. This is relevant to the wider historical context of the play. In the Jacobean and Elizabethan eras, women remained loyal to their fathers (or their eldest brother) until they were married and were controlled legally, financially and often physically by them. However, Miranda also wants to get to know Ferdinand and is possibly falling in love with him. She tells him, ‘I would not wish / Any companion in the world but you’. Even after worrying about her father’s reaction, she says that she would like him as a ‘companion’. However, the verb ‘wish’ still does imply that she may not act on her love but would only ‘wish’ for it. Here, Miranda is presented as child-like since she can ‘wish’ for the things she wants but has no power to make them a reality because of parental rule.
  • Question 5

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 4: The Merchant of Venice

 

Read the following extract from Act 3, Scene 1 of The Merchant of Venice and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Salarino and Shylock are discussing Jessica's elopement and rumours of Antonio's losses at sea. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents prejudice.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents prejudice in this extract and how Shakespeare presents prejudice in the play as a whole

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this scene, Shakespeare uses repetition and contrasts throughout to present prejudice as deeply ingrained into the society and characters. Shakespeare writes: ‘He hath disgraced me, and / hindered me half a million; laughed at my losses, / mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my / bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies’. Here, Shylock implies that Antonio has tried to ruin his life, suggesting his actions are premeditated and personal. Shylock is sure the reason is linked to Antonio’s prejudices. Shakespeare writes: ‘what’s his reason? I am a Jew.’ Shylock’s use of a question which he answers himself shows the answer is obvious to him and suggests prejudice is rife. However, Shakespeare then uses listing to and repetition of the word ‘same’ to prove that Christians and Jews are not that different. He points out that both religions are ‘fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means’. This suggests that Shylock sees prejudice as wrong and unfounded however closer analysis reveals that the repetition focuses less on whether or not people should be judged by their differences and more on how Shylock as a Jew is not actually that different to Christians. This presents his views of prejudice as quite complex; he does not necessarily think it is wrong to judge someone for their differences but also believes there are many things that unite people as humans (they eat, are hurt and get ill in the same way). This is relevant to the wider historical context of the play because Jewish people often suffered prejudice in Shakespeare’s England and many were the subject of ridicule in other contemporary plays at the time including Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta. It could be argued that Shakespeare is also drawing on crude Jewish stereotypes to create comedy as, although he creates sympathy for him here, Shylock is ultimately presented as a villainous character in the play.
  • Question 6

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 5: Much Ado About Nothing

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 2 of Much Ado About Nothing and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Don Jon has learnt about the upcoming marriage of Claudio and Hero and wishes he could prevent it. His servant, Boracio, has devised a plan to put a stop to the wedding. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents revenge.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents revenge in this extract and how Shakespeare presents revenge in the play as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this extract, Shakespeare presents revenge as something that Don John is determined to have, no matter the consequences. He tells Borachio: ‘Any bar, any cross, any impediment will be / medicinable to me: I am sick in displeasure to him’. Here, Shakespeare uses a metaphor to demonstrate that his hatred for Claudio is making him ‘sick’ and that any revenge enacted will be ‘medicinal’ which suggests it will soothe him in some way. In this sense, Shakespeare presents revenge as something that soothes or eases the pain of another terrible act and wishing revenge of Claudio does not necessarily make Don John an evil character. However, later on in this scene, Shakespeare does present Don John as evil when he seems just as pleased that many people will be hurt by his revenge on Claudio. When Borachio informs him that their plan intends ‘to misuse the prince, to vex Claudio, to undo Hero and kill Leonato’, Don John responds using a plural pronoun: ‘Only to despite them, I will do any thing.’ Here, ‘them’ suggests that his revenge extends beyond Claudio and their previous feud. Here, Shakespeare presents revenge as fueled by jealousy since Don John seems very pleased by the idea of ruining the reputations of these other characters. For him, revenge is not achieved through violence or murder but in seeing his enemies humiliated publicly. This links to the wider historical context of the play because social reputation was very important to Elizabethans, particularly for unmarried women who were judged on their innocence and virtue. To have shamed Hero in the way these men intend to would not have merely humiliated her but could have resulted in her father disowning her or worse, death. This was particularly ironic given that Queen Elizabeth herself never married.
  • Question 7

 

Section A: Shakespeare

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 6: Julius Caesar

 

Read the following extract from Act 2, Scene 1 of Julius Caesar and then answer the question that follows.

 

At this point in the play, Portia is worried about her husband's well-being. She tries to convince Brutus to share his worries. 

 

 

Starting with this moment in the play, explore how Shakespeare presents Brutus.

 

Write about how Shakespeare presents Brutus in this extract and how Shakespeare presents Brutus in the play as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

+ AO4 [4 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the play overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Shakespeare presents Brutus as someone who deeply loves and respects his wife. Throughout this extract, he uses adjectives such as ‘true and honourable’, ‘gentle’ and ‘noble’. Interestingly, Shakespeare chooses contrasting adjectives in terms of literary gender roles. Particularly in Elizabethan times, women were often thought of as gentle and virtuous whereas men were praised for their honour and power or nobility. In Brutus’ descriptions of his wife as having both masculine and feminine traits, Shakespeare is subverting societal gender roles in his time since these ‘honourable’ and ‘noble’ masculine attributes present her as Brutus’ equal. On the other hand, Portia’s reactions to her husband suggest that he may not regard her as an equal. Throughout this scene, she is pestering him to open up to her about his worries and Shakespeare uses rhetorical questions throughout her dialogue to emphasise her frustration at him. At the very end, she reveals she committed self-harm to prove herself. She asks, ‘Giving myself a voluntary wound / Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience. / And not my husband's secrets?’. This suggests that she is desperate for him to confide in her and is willing to prove her physical strength (through her tolerance of pain) to convince him of this. Therefore, Portia does not necessarily feel Brutus regards her as equal.
  • Question 8

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Either

 

Question 7: Robert Louis Stevenson - The Strange Case of  Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 4 of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Remarkable Incident of Dr Lanyon) and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Utterson has gone to visit Dr Lanyon after the death of their acquaintance, Sir Danvers Carew.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Stevenson creates suspicion around Dr Jekyll.

 

Write about how Stevenson presents suspicion in this extract and how Stevenson presents suspicion in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Stevenson uses a range of techniques in this extract to build already growing suspicion around Dr Jekyll. He begins by describing how Utterson tried repeatedly to visit Jekyll to be turned away by Poole despite only seeing him a few days before. Stevenson uses repetition of ‘On the…’ and ‘again’ to show quite how many times Utterson visited and was refused. This builds suspicion because only three days before it had been like ‘when the three were inseparable friends’ and now Jekyll won’t even face Utterson to explain why he can’t see them. Although Poole explains that he is sick, the fact that he ‘saw no one’ hints that he might be ashamed of something or worse has run away because of something bad he has done. This is supported by Lanyon’s reaction when Utterson mentions Jekyll’s name. Stevenson describes how ‘Lanyon’s face changed, and he held up a trembling hand’. Here, the adjective ‘trembling’ suggests that something has made Lanyon feel scared or angry at hearing Jekyll’s name. This dramatic reaction implies that Lanyon suddenly feels very negative towards Jekyll. In the case of both Jekyll and Lanyon, Stevenson uses a contrast between the opening description of the three men as ‘inseparable’ to emphasise how weirdly both men are acting. Lanyon’s sudden hatred of Jekyll strongly implies that he has done something terrible and thus Stevenson builds suspicion around him as a character. This is relevant to the wider historical context of this novel because in the 1800s, gossip and scandal were rife (particularly among the upper classes) and it was a common theme in Victorian literature. Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray deals with a similar character who has to hide a dark secret from the world and becomes the subject of much gossip.
  • Question 9

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 8: Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 1 (Stave 1) of A Christmas Carol and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by the ghost of his former business partner, Jacob Marley.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Dickens builds suspense.

 

Write about how Dickens builds suspense in this extract and how Dickens builds suspense in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that Shakespeare uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the play. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this play. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this extract, Charles Dickens builds suspense by using personification and sensory details such as sounds to build up a haunting image. He describes how Scrooge saw the ‘disused’ bell in his room ‘begin to swing’ until ‘it rang out so loudly, and so did every bell in the house’. Here, Dickens sets the scene with the adjective ‘disused’ which implies that the reader should not expect the bell to be a big feature of this story. The use of personification in the phrase ‘begin to swing’ gives the bell a life of its own and is not used here merely to emphasise a metaphorical idea (as it is usually) but to describe the movements of an inanimate object. This builds suspense as the reader will be intrigued and want to know what is causing this strange occurrence. From there, the sounds grow louder and louder until the whole house is ringing out loud. Here, Dickens creates a chaotic and noisy picture and any reader empathising with Scrooge would pity him for having to experience this. The use of bells here to represent the appearance of Marley (whose death Scrooge may have been responsible for) could also link to church bells. This is relevant to the wider historical context of the novel because religion played an important role in how Victorian moral values were determined. The use of bells here foreshadows that Scrooge is about to confess his sins because of these ghostly visits. The link between morality and the supernatural is a common one in literature also with Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus both receiving supernatural visits that encourage them to question their views on morality.
  • Question 10

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 9: Charles Dickens - Great Expectations

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 8 of Great Expectations and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Pip has gone to Satis House. Here, he meets Miss Havisham for the first time.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Dickens presents women.

 

Write about how Dickens presents women in this extract and how Dickens presents women in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this extract, Dickens presents Miss Havisham objectifying herself for men. He opens the extract with a description of her outfit as it was the day she was married. He describes how she was ‘dressed in rich materials,—satins, and lace, and silks’ and ‘bright jewels sparkled on her neck and on her hands’. Here, Dickens uses words from the semantic field of luxury – ‘satins’, ‘lace’, ‘silks’ and ‘jewels’ – to present Miss Havisham as dressed in a lavish outfit fit for royalty. Every inch of her body is covered in sparkling and shiny materials. The later description that her other dresses are ‘less splendid’ implies that she looks magnificent (or did on her wedding day). As the text progresses and Dickens tarnishes the previous descriptions with adjectives such as ‘yellowing’ and ’sunken’, it is clear Miss Havisham no longer bothers with her appearance, even though it was once important to her. This implies that she only made herself look this way for her fiancée and views women as objects that should be pretty, much like the ‘jewels’ she wears. This is relevant to the wider historical context of the novel because, in Victorian times, women were often viewed as objects that should be pretty to look at. Back then, women resorted to many dangerous beauty remedies (including face bleaching and deadly nightshade eye-drops) in their attempts to seem beautiful and find a husband. This was driven by the lack of rights women had at the time – by marrying into a wealthy family, women could greatly improve their living circumstances.
  • Question 11

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 10: Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 2 of Jane Eyre and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Miss Abbott and Bessie Lee lock Jane Eyre in the Red Room as punishment for fighting with her cousin.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Brontë uses setting to build tension.

 

Write about how Brontë uses setting to build tension in this extract and how Brontë uses setting to build tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this extract, Charlotte Brontë uses her description of the red-room to build tension. She begins by describing it as a ‘square chamber’. Although the noun ‘chamber’ is another word for bedroom, the use of it here with the adjective ‘square’ gives the impression of it as prison-like. This is relevant to the wider narrative as it symbolises how Jane experiences the room when she is locked in here. To her, it isn’t simply a bedroom ‘seldom slept in’ but rather a cell that she is trapped inside. This builds suspense because the reader is aware that Jane is at the mercy of the other characters and they would empathise with her fear of being held against her will. The objects in the room are described as being very large. Brontë describes how it was one of the ‘largest and stateliest’ rooms with ‘massive pillars of mahogany’, shades that ‘rose high’ and ‘piled-up mattresses and pillows’. These descriptions each give the impression of the room looming over Jane and imply that the furniture itself is intimidating to her. The revelation that this was the room where Mr Reed died only further builds suspense because it hints at the idea that it could be haunted, or at least that is associated with grief and sadness. This links to the wider context of the novel because Victorian society had a fascination with spirits and the occult. During this period, psychic mediums and mysterious magical societies formed and many believed it was possible to contact spirits of the dead. This was driven by Christian values which teach that the soul lives on in Heaven or Hell after the body dies. To lock Jane in here would be a distressing experience and it is likely the reader (particularly a Victorian one) would sympathise with her.
  • Question 12

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 11: Mary Shelley - Frankenstein

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 20 of Frankenstein and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, Dr Frankenstein has just destroyed the monster's companion. He had promised the monster he would make one but feared the consequences of creating another creature.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Shelley builds tension.

 

Write about how Shelley builds tension in this extract and how Shelley builds tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Shelley builds suspense in this passage by using supernatural descriptions of the monster, who is seen ‘by the light of the moon’ and goes on to be described as a ‘daemon’ and a ‘wretch’. These descriptions are inhuman but, more than being just animalistic, there are many supernatural connotations at play. His ‘howl’ is animalistic and the adjective ‘devilish’ has implications of the supernatural, and yet, what is devilish is his ‘despair’. This is a human emotion that emphasises the humanity of the monster over all else. While, on the one hand, this builds suspense because the animalistic and supernatural elements must be frightening for Dr. Frankenstein, another element of suspense comes from the hopes of the monster, with whom the reader is therefore also able to sympathise. This links to the wider historical context of the novel because references to the ‘moonlight’, ‘daemon’ and the ‘devilish’ are examples of Gothic conventions that are used to build tension. Gothic conventions such as eerie landscapes and moonlight are also used in Bram Stoker’s later novel Dracula to build tension and present the antagonist vampire as a supernatural daemon, similarly to Frankenstein’s monster.
  • Question 13

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 12: Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 3 of Pride and Prejudice and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract, the reader is first introduced to Mr Bingley, a wealthy young gentleman who has rented a property in the local area.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Austen presents Mr Bingley.

 

Write about how Austen presents Mr Bingley in this extract and how Austen presents Mr Bingley in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: In this extract, Austen presents Mr. Bingley as a charming and very likeable gentleman. She uses adjectives such as ‘pleasant’, ‘amiable’, ‘lively’ and ‘unreserved’ to present him as someone with a wonderful personality. In this way, he is used as an example of a fine gentleman in order for Mr. Darcy’s to be introduced to the reader by comparison. Where Bingley has a ‘pleasant countenance’, Darcy’s is ‘most forbidding’ and ‘disagreeable’. This ironic on many levels, firstly in Austen’s later remarks that Mr. Darcy is ‘unworthy to be compared to his friend’ given that this is precisely what most of the previous description has done. Secondly, it is ironic because Elizabeth Bennett will later come to fall in love with rude and ignorant Mr. Darcy, despite Mr. Bingley’s charming qualities. The only positive descriptions of Mr. Darcy in this extract relate to his physical appearance. Austen uses alliteration to present his as a ‘fine figure’ and compares him to Bingley again to remark that he is ‘much handsomer’ than him. In this sense, Austen creates a further irony that links to the wider historical context of the novel. Austen grew up in a time where women had little rights but where the roots of feminism were beginning with England’s first female queen and author Mary Wollstonecraft beginning to discuss the roles of each gender in her writing. Here, Austen is arguably objectifying Darcy in much the same way that women were viewed in her time; because he is good-looking, Darcy is called a ‘fine fellow’ and receives ‘great admiration’ while likeable Bingley doesn’t receive nearly as much attention.
  • Question 14

 

Section B: The 19th-century novel

Answer one question from this section on your chosen text.

 


 

Or

 

Question 13: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - The Sign of Four

 

Read the following extract from Chapter 3 (In Quest of a Solution) of The Sign of Four and then answer the question that follows.

 

In this extract,Holmes and Watson discuss Major Shalto's death.

 

 

 

Starting with this extract, explore how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension.

 

Write about how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension in this extract and how Conan Doyle builds mystery and tension in the novel as a whole.

 

[30 marks]

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider the question focus, how it appears in this extract and how it appears in the text overall. Plan your response carefully and explain your ideas, backing them up with reason and clear references to the text. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to think carefully about the links to wider meanings and the key themes of the novel. Also, you are awarded marks for your references to the wider historical context of this text. Don’t forget, there are four marks awarded here for your use of accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar so make sure to use clear paragraphs. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: Conan Doyle uses contrast and irony to build mystery and tension surrounding Major Shalto’s death without revealing who is responsible. The novel’s protagonist Sherlock Holmes arrives in a great mood and Conan Doyle emphasises this using a triplet of adjectives, describing him as ‘lively, eager and in excellent spirits’. This is immediately contrasted with the narrator Watson’s description of him as alternating between this and ‘fits of the blackest depression’. In this sense, Conan Doyle uses a binary opposition to present Holmes as the sort of person who is either really happy or terribly sad. By the descriptions here, his happiness builds tension because it leads the reader to believe that he has made a breakthrough with the case. This is confirmed when he announces to Watson, ‘There is no great mystery in this matter’. This is ironic because it is precisely this phrase that builds mystery and tension because, at this point, neither the reader nor Watson can work out who murdered Major Shalto. Even when Holmes explains his theory, Watson is still unable to solve the mystery. In this way, Conan Doyle uses two separate ‘stories’ to build tension and reveal small details to tease the reader but not give away the ending. As Watson narrates the story, the reader can only know what he knows so Holmes’ knowledge of the case is another unknown story that exists but is cleverly fed to the reader through their conversations. This links to the wider context of Victorian Literature which often used a narrator who was detached or separate from the main narrative to create mystery around the protagonist. Another famous example of this is Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde where the story is slowly revealed to us by a man named Utterson as he discovers what has happened for himself.
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