The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

GCSE Practice Paper in the style of Eduqas English Language Paper 1

In this assessment, students will be able to complete a timed GCSE English Language Paper 1 in the style of Eduqas.

'GCSE Practice Paper in the style of Eduqas English Language Paper 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   English Language

GCSE Boards:   Eduqas

Curriculum topic:   GCSE Sample Practice Papers

Curriculum subtopic:   Paper 1

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This is a practice GCSE English Language Paper 1 in the style of Eduqas (WJEC CBAC).

 

In the GCSE examination, you will complete your answers in a written answer booklet or on a computer. You will be given a question paper and a separate reading insert. 

 

At EdPlace, you will be given both the reading insert and the questions together. You will also type your answers manually into onscreen boxes and use marking criteria to grade your answers afterwards.

 

The time is set for 1 hour and 45 minutes (105 minutes) but you can keep working once the timer has run out. You need to manage your working effectively to ensure you have enough time to complete all questions.

 

This paper includes all questions types in the style of Eduqas. The guidance below is also in the style of Eduqas.

 

GCSE​ ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

COMPONENT 1 - 20 th Century Literature Reading and Creative Prose Writing

 

Time allowed: 1 hour and 45 minutes

 

You must have:

Source A - the reading insert

The question paper (questions 1 - 7)

 

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Answer all questions in Section A.

Select one title to use for your writing in Section B.

 

You are advised to spend your time as follows:

Section A - about 10 minutes reading + about 50 minutes answering the questions

Section B - about 10 minutes planning + about 35 minutes writing

 

 

INFORMATION TO CANDIDATES

Section A (reading): 40 marks

Section B (writing): 40 marks

 

The number of marks is given in brackets at the end of each question or part question.

 

 

Disclaimer:

We have no affiliation to Eduqas and these questions represent our own unique content developed by EdPlace GCSE authors.

None of the content displayed here has been supplied by Eduqas or any other third party suppliers.

READING INSERT

 

Read the text below and answer Questions 1 - 4 on the question paper. 

Read the extract below carefully before moving on to the next page. Leave the box at the bottom un-checked until you've finished the entire paper and checked your answers.

You should spend about fifteen minutes reading this section and looking through the questions that follow.

 

This is an extract from the beginning of a novel. Dorothy and her family live on Kansas prairie where not much happens. One day, they spot a storm approaching.

 

The Wizard of Oz: L. Frank Baum

 

 

*Cyclone - hurricane, tornado

*Prairie - large open flat grassland (particularly in North America)

I've completed all questions and checked my answers.

SECTION A - Reading

 

Question 1

Read lines 1 to 9 of the extract.

 

 

List five things you learn about Dorothy's house in these lines.

 

[5 marks]

 

Question 4

 

Read lines 34 to 47. How does the writer make these lines tense and dramatic?

 

You should write about: what happens to build tension and drama; the writer's use of language to create tension and drama; and the effects on the reader. You must refer to the text to support your answer.

 

 

[10 marks]

Section B - 40 marks

 

In this section, you will be assessed on the quality of your creative prose writing skills.

 

24 marks are awarded for Communication and Organisation; 16 marks are awarded for vocabulary, sentence structure, spelling and punctuation (Technical Accuracy)

 

You should aim to write about 450 - 600 words.

 

Choose ONE of the following titles for your writing:

 

Either,      (a)  The Oncoming Storm.

Or,            (b)  The Hiding Place

Or,            (c)  Write about a time you went to stay with relatives/friends.

Or,            (d)  Write a story which begins: It was only a matter of time before they found me...

 

Use a separate sheet of paper to plan your work. You should use about 10 minutes for planning and 35 minutes to write your answer.

 

[40 marks]

Question 2

 

Look in detail at this extract, from lines 13 to 21 of the source.

 

 

How does the writer describe the prairie?

You must refer to the language used in the text to support your answer.

 

[5 marks]

Question 3

 

Look in detail at this extract, from lines 22 to 30 of the source.

 

 

What impressions do you get of Aunt Em from these lines?

You must refer to the text to support your answer.

 

[10 marks]

Question 5

 

Focus this part of your answer on the second part of the source, from line 31 to the end.

 

 

'The writer uses contrasts to show how Dorothy and Toto differ from the other characters.'

 

To what extent do you agree with this view?

You should write about: your impressions of Dorothy, Toto and the other characters as they are presented here and in the rest of the extract; and how the writer has created these impressions.

 

[10 marks]

  • Question 1

READING INSERT

 

Read the text below and answer Questions 1 - 4 on the question paper. 

Read the extract below carefully before moving on to the next page. Leave the box at the bottom un-checked until you've finished the entire paper and checked your answers.

You should spend about fifteen minutes reading this section and looking through the questions that follow.

 

This is an extract from the beginning of a novel. Dorothy and her family live on Kansas prairie where not much happens. One day, they spot a storm approaching.

 

The Wizard of Oz: L. Frank Baum

 

 

*Cyclone - hurricane, tornado

*Prairie - large open flat grassland (particularly in North America)

CORRECT ANSWER
I've completed all questions and checked my answers.
EDDIE SAYS
Well done. You've now completed the GCSE Language Paper 1 in the style of Eduqas.
  • Question 2

SECTION A - Reading

 

Question 1

Read lines 1 to 9 of the extract.

 

 

List five things you learn about Dorothy's house in these lines.

 

[5 marks]

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award one mark for every correct answer. Ace this question by making sure you only use answers from the lines indicated i.e. 1-9. Beware as this sometimes cuts the text off mid-sentence. Remember: - Answers can be direct quotations or written in your own words. - They MUST relate to the focus of the question which is 'the house'.
  • Question 3

Question 4

 

Read lines 34 to 47. How does the writer make these lines tense and dramatic?

 

You should write about: what happens to build tension and drama; the writer's use of language to create tension and drama; and the effects on the reader. You must refer to the text to support your answer.

 

 

[10 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider what you think about the statement and explain your ideas, backing them up with reasons. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where you identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you need to consider how effective the author's choices are. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: The author presents the storm as intimidating and scary by using sensory detail to describe the effects of it before the reader (or characters) can see it. This helps to build tension in the story and makes these lines seem very dramatic to a reader. The text describes how first ‘they heard a low wail of the wind’ and then how ‘Uncle Henry and Dorothy could see where the long grass bowed in waves’. Describing the storm as having a ‘low wail’ is an example of personification which presents the storm like a beast on its way to them. This helps to build tension as it presents the storm as sad or angry since it emits a ‘wail’. The description of the grass helps to further present the storm as dramatic because the grass literally ‘bowed’ when the storm was coming. This presents the grass as much less powerful than the storm as it is as quaking in fear of its arrival. This would engage the reader because they are already able to see the devastating effects of the storm before it arrives. By structuring the text in this way, it encourages the reader to imagine how bad the damage will be to the characters and make them sympathise with their situation. This would build tension and make them want to read on as they would want to know the outcome for Dorothy and her family.
  • Question 4

Section B - 40 marks

 

In this section, you will be assessed on the quality of your creative prose writing skills.

 

24 marks are awarded for Communication and Organisation; 16 marks are awarded for vocabulary, sentence structure, spelling and punctuation (Technical Accuracy)

 

You should aim to write about 450 - 600 words.

 

Choose ONE of the following titles for your writing:

 

Either,      (a)  The Oncoming Storm.

Or,            (b)  The Hiding Place

Or,            (c)  Write about a time you went to stay with relatives/friends.

Or,            (d)  Write a story which begins: It was only a matter of time before they found me...

 

Use a separate sheet of paper to plan your work. You should use about 10 minutes for planning and 35 minutes to write your answer.

 

[40 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This question is a chance for you to show off your writing skills. Choose to either produce narrative or descriptive writing. Whichever you choose, you need to make sure you're using lots of language techniques, structural features, accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar. To gain higher marks, you should ensure you write closely to the brief in the question and carefully consider the AUDIENCE and PURPOSE. Try to include sophisticated vocabulary and use more complex language techniques. Here is an example of the opening to an answer that would've got full marks. The Oncoming Storm: The lightning cracked across the sky. With each flash, it branched out across the darkness like a giant tree, unfurling its leaves for the summer sun. Here, however, there was no sun. The place itself was sad; drained over the years of any life it had left. The people were drained too. Empty husks of skin that couldn't smile or laugh but they could scream. That was what the storm wanted them to do. Scream. Scream for their lives.
  • Question 5

Question 2

 

Look in detail at this extract, from lines 13 to 21 of the source.

 

 

How does the writer describe the prairie?

You must refer to the language used in the text to support your answer.

 

[5 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques that the writer uses. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex language techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks (5): As this section of the text progresses, the author uses a range of techniques to build up an image of the prairie as a bleak and lonely place. Adjectives such as ‘dull’, ‘flat’ and ‘grey’ present the place as boring and stationary, implying that nothing lively or interesting happens there. The word ‘grey’ is repeated throughout this extract and further emphasised using other language techniques such as alliteration, as in the phrase ‘great grey prairie’. Presenting the prairie in this way encourages the reader to feel sorry for Dorothy and the other characters as their home is described very much like a grey prison cell.
  • Question 6

Question 3

 

Look in detail at this extract, from lines 22 to 30 of the source.

 

 

What impressions do you get of Aunt Em from these lines?

You must refer to the text to support your answer.

 

[10 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques that the writer uses. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex language techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks (10): The writer uses language to present Aunt Em as a woman who has been negatively affected by living in the prairie. At the beginning of the extract, the writer uses adjectives such as ‘young’ and pretty’ to show how she used to be. By using these adjectives, the writer can contrast later descriptions of Aunt Em to show how ‘the sun and wind had changed her’. Here, the writer uses a metaphor to imply that the weather is responsible for the change in Aunt Em and not her reaction to her surroundings. The writer describes how she is now ‘thin and gaunt’. These two adjectives are a direct contrast to the adjectives used at the beginning of the extract; now instead of looking full of life, Aunt Em looks old and haggard. The writer also describes how she ‘never smiled now’. The adverb ‘now’ is interesting as it doesn't present Em as someone who never smiled, but rather someone who no longer smiles. This implies that Aunt Em has not always been miserable and that living on the prairie has made her this way. This could make the reader feel sympathy for her since the place has effectively ruined her life, and also sympathise with Dorothy as they might worry she too will turn ‘grey’ like her aunt and uncle.
  • Question 7

Question 5

 

Focus this part of your answer on the second part of the source, from line 31 to the end.

 

 

'The writer uses contrasts to show how Dorothy and Toto differ from the other characters.'

 

To what extent do you agree with this view?

You should write about: your impressions of Dorothy, Toto and the other characters as they are presented here and in the rest of the extract; and how the writer has created these impressions.

 

[10 marks]

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Here, you need to focus on the language techniques and structural features that the writer uses. You should consider what you think about the statement and explain your ideas, backing them up with reasons. You should use a paragraph structure that includes a Point (where identify a language technique used in the writing), Evidence (a quotation from the text to back up your Point) and Analysis (a description of the effect created by this technique). In this question, you also need to EVALUATE how effective the author's choices are (not just analyse as you have been doing for the previous questions). You will also need to clearly state how far you agree with the statement and why. To gain higher marks, you should aim to explain your answer in as much detail as you can and identify more complex techniques. Here is an example of a paragraph that would get full marks: The author uses contrasts to present Dorothy and Toto as separate from the ‘great grey prairie’ and the people who inhabit it. Dorothy’s family are repeatedly described as ‘grey’ – Aunt Em has ‘sober grey eyes’ and lips that ‘were grey also’ while Uncle Henry ‘was grey also, from his long beard to his rough boots’. By presenting the prairie and its people this way, the author is showing how the bleak landscape is turning them into dull, lifeless characters. Here, the greyness of the prairie has metaphorically infected the people. The author notes how Aunt Em ‘was a young, pretty wife’ before she moved here and the ‘sun and wind had changed her’. Yet, Dorothy has Toto, her dog, who ‘saved her from growing as grey as her other surroundings’. This contrast implies that Dorothy and Toto are immune to the contagious greyness of the prairie. This is something that the author presents as unlikely when he states that Aunt Em was ‘startled by the child’s laughter’. Here, Dorothy’s happiness is not something her aunt should find shocking. This implies how uncommon happiness in this bleak and desolate prairie.
Try it ---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.