The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Types of Teeth 2

In this worksheet, students will be helped to extend their understanding of what teeth do for us and for other animals and how they are designed for the job they do.

'Types of Teeth 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Animals, including Humans

Curriculum subtopic:   Teeth

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 You know quite a lot about teeth already: you know that they're important in helping us digest our food by chopping it up into smaller pieces to make it easier and quicker to digest; you know that teeth help us talk and are important in the way we look.

 

Mouth

 

For all animals teeth are very important. This worksheet should help you find out a little more about teeth and help you to explore why they do what they do and how they are shaped to do that job.

Let's get gnashing!

A baby is usually born with no teeth. Their teeth start to come through from about the age of 3 months.

 

At about what age do we start to lose our 'milk' teeth (that's our first set of teeth) and begin to replace them with our adult teeth?

3 years

6 years

10 years

12 years

Eventually all our milk teeth have been pushed out by our adult teeth.

 

At about what age do we lose our final milk tooth?

10 years

13 years

16 years

18 years

Adult humans have a maximum of 32 teeth.  We have four types of teeth:

 

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this tooth:

 

Molar teeth

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is. Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

incisor

canine

premolar/molar

Here is that list of teeth again.

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this next tooth:

 

Incisors 

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is. Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

incisor

canine

premolar/molar

Here is that list of teeth again.

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this next tooth, which is arrowed (it is best shown in a non-human mouth - not telling you what it is!):

 

Dog's teeth

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is.

 

Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

incisor

canine

premolar/molar

The type of teeth an animal has in its mouth decides what sort of food the animal is going to eat - in other words, its diet.

 

  • HERBIVORES are plant-eaters and have to grind up plants to get the goodness out.
  • CARNIVORES are meat-eaters and have teeth to tear the flesh of their prey.
  • OMNIVORES have a varied diet, both plants and meat.

 

Look at the skull of this animal:

 

 

Look at the different types of teeth it has. Use your knowledge of teeth and what they are for to decide whether this is the skull of a herbivore, a carnivore or an omnivore.

herbivore

carnivore

omnivore

The type of teeth an animal has in its mouth decides what sort of food the animal is going to eat - in other words, its diet.

 

  • HERBIVORES are plant-eaters and have to grind up plants to get the goodness out.
  • CARNIVORES are meat-eaters and have teeth to tear the flesh of their prey.
  • OMNIVORES have a varied diet, both plants and meat.

 

Look at the skull of this animal:

 

 

 

Look at the different types of teeth it has.

 

Use your knowledge of teeth and what they are for to decide whether this is the skull of a herbivore, a carnivore or an omnivore.

herbivore

carnivore

omnivore

From what you've learned about teeth can you match the food to the type of teeth we use when eating it.

Column A

Column B

brussels sprout
incisor/molar
apple
incisor/molar
chicken
incisor/molar
biscuit
molar
walnut
canine/molar
steak
canine/molar
chocolate
incisor/molar
  • Question 1

A baby is usually born with no teeth. Their teeth start to come through from about the age of 3 months.

 

At about what age do we start to lose our 'milk' teeth (that's our first set of teeth) and begin to replace them with our adult teeth?

CORRECT ANSWER
6 years
EDDIE SAYS
When you were 5/6 years old you found that first tooth starting to be wobbly as the adult one underneath pushed it up. Then you had that gap in your front teeth you could whistle through!
  • Question 2

Eventually all our milk teeth have been pushed out by our adult teeth.

 

At about what age do we lose our final milk tooth?

CORRECT ANSWER
13 years
EDDIE SAYS
Although it hasn't happened yet you will lose that last milk tooth somewhere between 11 and 14 at which point you will have your adult set (minus the wisdom teeth that arrive later on). Look after them - there won't be any more!
  • Question 3

Adult humans have a maximum of 32 teeth.  We have four types of teeth:

 

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this tooth:

 

Molar teeth

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is. Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

CORRECT ANSWER
premolar/molar
EDDIE SAYS
The surface of the tooth is bumpy with sharp ridges. These would be good for holding food in and crushing it as well as grinding it as the teeth move from side to side (rather like a cow 'chewing the cud'). That makes it one of our molars.
  • Question 4

Here is that list of teeth again.

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this next tooth:

 

Incisors 

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is. Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

CORRECT ANSWER
incisor
EDDIE SAYS
These teeth are shaped like chisels or blades - they would be good at biting into things to separate them (like biting into an apple) or nibbling food. That makes them incisors.
  • Question 5

Here is that list of teeth again.

  • INCISORS - for nibbling
  • CANINES - for tearing
  • PREMOLARS and MOLARS - for crushing

 

Look at the shape of this next tooth, which is arrowed (it is best shown in a non-human mouth - not telling you what it is!):

 

Dog's teeth

 

Decide which sort of tooth it is.

 

Use the list above, look at the features of the tooth and try to match those features to its likely job to decide what it is.

CORRECT ANSWER
canine
EDDIE SAYS
You probably worked this out: it's a dog's set of teeth. Their canine teeth are bigger than ours because they deal with more meat in their diet than we do. A wolf's canines not only tear meat but are important in helping the animal to hang on to their prey in order to capture it.
  • Question 6

The type of teeth an animal has in its mouth decides what sort of food the animal is going to eat - in other words, its diet.

 

  • HERBIVORES are plant-eaters and have to grind up plants to get the goodness out.
  • CARNIVORES are meat-eaters and have teeth to tear the flesh of their prey.
  • OMNIVORES have a varied diet, both plants and meat.

 

Look at the skull of this animal:

 

 

Look at the different types of teeth it has. Use your knowledge of teeth and what they are for to decide whether this is the skull of a herbivore, a carnivore or an omnivore.

CORRECT ANSWER
carnivore
EDDIE SAYS
If the question told you this was a tiger's skull (which it is) you'd know straight away - carnivore. Not knowing that, you looked at the teeth: you saw those giant canines, which the tiger needs to capture deer. You saw the premolars which act like scissors, slicing the meat into smaller pieces. That's how you decided it was a carnivore.
  • Question 7

The type of teeth an animal has in its mouth decides what sort of food the animal is going to eat - in other words, its diet.

 

  • HERBIVORES are plant-eaters and have to grind up plants to get the goodness out.
  • CARNIVORES are meat-eaters and have teeth to tear the flesh of their prey.
  • OMNIVORES have a varied diet, both plants and meat.

 

Look at the skull of this animal:

 

 

 

Look at the different types of teeth it has.

 

Use your knowledge of teeth and what they are for to decide whether this is the skull of a herbivore, a carnivore or an omnivore.

CORRECT ANSWER
herbivore
EDDIE SAYS
This time you've got a deer's skull - the sort of prey a tiger (from Q6) might eat. First notice the big gap near the front of the mouth - there are no canines (or any teeth) there behind the incisors (which are useful for nibbling grass). At the back of the mouth are lots of molars which the deer uses to grind up all the vegetation it eats. Plant material is hard to digest and needs serious crushing and grinding!
  • Question 8

From what you've learned about teeth can you match the food to the type of teeth we use when eating it.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

brussels sprout
incisor/molar
apple
incisor/molar
chicken
canine/molar
biscuit
incisor/molar
walnut
molar
steak
canine/molar
chocolate
incisor/molar
EDDIE SAYS
To be honest there's usually a variety of teeth that deal with individual types of food: take an apple - our incisors bite into it to remove a chunk of fruit and then we crush it up using our molars.
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.