The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Separating Mixtures

Exploring some of the ways we can separate the different substances in a mixture.

'Separating Mixtures' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Properties and Changes of Materials

Curriculum subtopic:  Separating Mixtures

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

We often come across things that have been mixed together. If you pour muesli into a bowl at breakfast time you can see that it is a mixture of things like oatflakes, fruits and nuts. Another, not so tasty, mixture might be the paper, glass and tins in a recycling bin. The things in a mixture don't join together to make something new. They can be separated out.

These beans and peas make a colourful (and nutritious!) mixture. With a lot of patience they could be separated into small piles of different peas and beans.

Let's look at some of the ways we can separate a mixture.

You are helping out in the garden and you've been asked to get some of the big stones out of the soil. How could this sieve help you?

the fine mesh of the filter lets the soil through but traps the stones

looking through the mesh makes it easier to see the stones on the ground

pouring water through the mesh lets you wash the soil away from the stones

What do you use if you want to separate solid particles from a liquid?

a filter

a magnet

a vacuum cleaner

A solution is a type of mixture in which one substance is dissolved in another, for example salt dissolves in water. This means that the salt is mixed into the water in such tiny particles you can't see them any more. How can we separate the salt from the water?

use magnets

evaporate the water

use a fine filter

You accidentally pour olive oil into some water. How can you separate them again?

let the water evaporate

wait until the oil floats on top of the water

filter the oil

The people at a recycling plant want to separate out the iron and steel from the other scrap metals. How could they do this?

 

use strong acids to dissolve the other metals

pick out all of the rusty bits

use a powerful magnet to pull out the iron and steel

  • Question 1

You are helping out in the garden and you've been asked to get some of the big stones out of the soil. How could this sieve help you?

CORRECT ANSWER
the fine mesh of the filter lets the soil through but traps the stones
EDDIE SAYS
A sieve is used to separate large particles from smaller ones. The size of particles that are trapped by the sieve depends on how big or small the holes in the mesh are.
  • Question 2

What do you use if you want to separate solid particles from a liquid?

CORRECT ANSWER
a filter
EDDIE SAYS
A filter is type of sieve in which the holes are so small that only the liquid can get through.
  • Question 3

A solution is a type of mixture in which one substance is dissolved in another, for example salt dissolves in water. This means that the salt is mixed into the water in such tiny particles you can't see them any more. How can we separate the salt from the water?

CORRECT ANSWER
evaporate the water
EDDIE SAYS
If you leave a dish of salty water long enough eventually all of the water will evaporate and the salt crystals will be left behind. No filter is fine enough to trap the dissolved salt.
  • Question 4

You accidentally pour olive oil into some water. How can you separate them again?

CORRECT ANSWER
wait until the oil floats on top of the water
EDDIE SAYS
Oil is less dense than water. If you leave the mixture undisturbed the oil wil eventually form a layer on top of the water.
  • Question 5

The people at a recycling plant want to separate out the iron and steel from the other scrap metals. How could they do this?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
use a powerful magnet to pull out the iron and steel
EDDIE SAYS
Iron and steel are magnetic materials and are attracted to a magnet. Other metals such as aluminium and copper are not magnetic.
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1