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Investigate: How Fast Does Your Ice Lolly Melt?

In this worksheet, students will revise how to plan, conduct and report on an investigation.

'Investigate: How Fast Does Your Ice Lolly Melt?' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs Science

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Investigating

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Here at EdPlace we know that you love doing scientific investigations and it's our mission to help you get lots of practice of how to plan, prepare, carry out and report on your investigation.

 

Child thinking

 

Harry wants to find out how warm different rooms in his school are, but rather than using a boring thermometer, he has decided that it would be fun to use ice lollies instead!

 

Ice lolly

 

Can you help him to plan and run his lolly-melting investigation?

Harry says, "I reckon that the ice lollies in the warmer rooms will melt faster than ones in the cooler rooms."

 

Is this Harry's ...

Prediction

Hypothesis

Conclusion

Guess

Harry plans to place an ice lolly in a bowl in different rooms in the school.

 

He's going to leave them for a time and then collect them to see how much they've melted.

 

He's keen to make sure that it's a fair test. 

 

Choose which of the following are fair or not fair.

 FairNot Fair
Using the same sort of lolly
Using two different sorts of lolly
Starting them all at the same time
Noting the starting time for each lolly
Placing lollies by radiators
Placing lollies as near to the centre of the room as possible
Leaving each lolly for 15 minutes
Leaving lollies for longer in bigger rooms

Harry is puzzled by how he can measure how much of each lolly has melted.

 

Here are his ideas:

 

Idea #1: "I could weigh it before and after."

 

Idea #2: "I could measure its length before and after."

 

Idea #3: "I could keep it in a bowl and measure how much had turned to liquid using a measuring cylinder."

 

Which one of these ideas do you think Harry will find easiest?

Idea #1

Idea #2

Idea #3

Harry places his ice lollies in five different rooms in the school (having asked permission!).

 

He's decided to leave each one for 15 minutes and then measure how much each one has melted.

 

As he collects each one he pours the lolly liquid into a measuring cylinder.

 

Here is a picture of one - what is the volume of liquid in this cylinder?

 

Idea #1

Idea #2

Idea #3

Harry collects all his results together in a table:

 

 

Room Volume of Melted Lolly/ml
Mrs. Bates's room 30
Mrs. Jackson's room 25
Mr. Jardine's room 32
Miss Warwick's room 24
Mr. Pearson's room 27

 

 

Use Harry's results to decide which lolly melted the most (look at the second column in the table) and also which classroom was the warmest (look at the first column in the table).

Idea #1

Idea #2

Idea #3

Harry thought that a table of results is not always clear and so he tried three different methods for displaying his results.

 

Here's what he came up with:

 

Graphs for 8555 Q6

 

In the grid below, match up each display method with its name.

Column A

Column B

A
Pie Chart
B
Line Graph
C
Bar Graph

Here are Harry's results again:

 

Room Volume of Melted Lolly/ml
Mrs. Bates's room 30
Mrs. Jackson's room 25
Mr. Jardine's room 32
Miss Warwick's room 24
Mr. Pearson's room 27

 

 

 

Work out the difference between the highest and lowest readings.

 

Put your answer as a number followed by a unit (or label).

Why do you think that Harry's results are all pretty similar?

Due to the rooms being similar (all classrooms)

Due to starting the experiments at the same time

Due to the same sort of ice lolly being used

Due to Harry measuring them incorrectly

What would you recommend to Harry to help him to get a better spread of results?

 

Fill in the gaps in the sentence below.

 

Hint: you can use the same word twice

Due to the rooms being similar (all classrooms)

Due to starting the experiments at the same time

Due to the same sort of ice lolly being used

Due to Harry measuring them incorrectly

If there are 27 rooms in Harry's school, how many would you recommend he tests out for temperature differences?

5

10

15

20

27

  • Question 1

Harry says, "I reckon that the ice lollies in the warmer rooms will melt faster than ones in the cooler rooms."

 

Is this Harry's ...

CORRECT ANSWER
Prediction
EDDIE SAYS
In this case it's Harry's prediction - he says that he predicts that lollies in warmer rooms will melt faster than those in cooler rooms. His hypothesis would be that ice lollies melt faster in warmer temperatures. Can you see how this is less specific? His conclusion will come after he's collected his data, as he tries to work out what his findings demonstrate or mean.
  • Question 2

Harry plans to place an ice lolly in a bowl in different rooms in the school.

 

He's going to leave them for a time and then collect them to see how much they've melted.

 

He's keen to make sure that it's a fair test. 

 

Choose which of the following are fair or not fair.

CORRECT ANSWER
 FairNot Fair
Using the same sort of lolly
Using two different sorts of lolly
Starting them all at the same time
Noting the starting time for each lolly
Placing lollies by radiators
Placing lollies as near to the centre of the room as possible
Leaving each lolly for 15 minutes
Leaving lollies for longer in bigger rooms
EDDIE SAYS
How was that? Let's sort out the most difficult claim first - when to start timing them. It would be fair to start them all at the same time, but think about it, how can Harry put all the ice lollies in the different rooms at the same time? He can't! So, it's best to note each one's starting time and give each lolly 15 minutes in the room. Harry needs to use the same sort of ice lolly for each room and they should be placed in the middle. Harry needs to leave every lolly for the same amount of time, irrespective of the size of the room. His investigation is to do with temperature, not room size.
  • Question 3

Harry is puzzled by how he can measure how much of each lolly has melted.

 

Here are his ideas:

 

Idea #1: "I could weigh it before and after."

 

Idea #2: "I could measure its length before and after."

 

Idea #3: "I could keep it in a bowl and measure how much had turned to liquid using a measuring cylinder."

 

Which one of these ideas do you think Harry will find easiest?

CORRECT ANSWER
Idea #3
EDDIE SAYS
Hmm... tricky! Melting lollies are messy things - sticky and slimy - so you need to factor that into your decision, as Harry will do. Imagine weighing a lolly or measuring its length - chances are, it'll slip out of your hands and smash on the floor. Oops! To be honest, the easiest method is to keep the ice lolly in a bowl, pour out the bit that's melted and see how much there is, using a measuring cylinder. Does this make sense?
  • Question 4

Harry places his ice lollies in five different rooms in the school (having asked permission!).

 

He's decided to leave each one for 15 minutes and then measure how much each one has melted.

 

As he collects each one he pours the lolly liquid into a measuring cylinder.

 

Here is a picture of one - what is the volume of liquid in this cylinder?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Can you see that the scale is going up in 1 ml amounts? One key skill you need is the ability to measure liquid volumes accurately: liquids always have a curved surface (not flat) when they are in a narrow tube (check it out!) You always measure from the bottom of the curve. That's in line with 5 marks above 40 ml = 45 ml. Got it?
  • Question 5

Harry collects all his results together in a table:

 

 

Room Volume of Melted Lolly/ml
Mrs. Bates's room 30
Mrs. Jackson's room 25
Mr. Jardine's room 32
Miss Warwick's room 24
Mr. Pearson's room 27

 

 

Use Harry's results to decide which lolly melted the most (look at the second column in the table) and also which classroom was the warmest (look at the first column in the table).

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Did you work out that the lolly that melted most must be in the warmest classroom (if Harry's prediction is correct)? The highest volume of melted lolly was 32 ml, in Mr. Jardine's classroom, so that's probably the warmest (according to this one result!).
  • Question 6

Harry thought that a table of results is not always clear and so he tried three different methods for displaying his results.

 

Here's what he came up with:

 

Graphs for 8555 Q6

 

In the grid below, match up each display method with its name.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

A
Line Graph
B
Bar Graph
C
Pie Chart
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully that was pretty straight forward! Depending on your results, the way that data is displayed can make a significant difference in how easy it is to see what's going on. Here, B is the bar chart which makes the results pretty clear.
  • Question 7

Here are Harry's results again:

 

Room Volume of Melted Lolly/ml
Mrs. Bates's room 30
Mrs. Jackson's room 25
Mr. Jardine's room 32
Miss Warwick's room 24
Mr. Pearson's room 27

 

 

 

Work out the difference between the highest and lowest readings.

 

Put your answer as a number followed by a unit (or label).

CORRECT ANSWER
8ml
8 ml
EDDIE SAYS
That should have been fairly easy to work out - mind you, the unit can be the tricky bit! Highest reading = 32 ml. Lowest reading = 24 ml. So, 32 - 24 = 8 ml. Let's push on.
  • Question 8

Why do you think that Harry's results are all pretty similar?

CORRECT ANSWER
Due to the rooms being similar (all classrooms)
EDDIE SAYS
Did you think that the results were fairly similar? Although he didn't start them at the same time, each lolly had 15 minutes. This was part of the fair test as the same lolly was used. The fact that all the lollies were in the same sort of room is likely to be the cause of the similarity in the results. The classrooms ought to be similar temperatures and so it's likely that an ice lolly left in any of them will melt to similar extents. Harry wants to try some different sorts of rooms!
  • Question 9

What would you recommend to Harry to help him to get a better spread of results?

 

Fill in the gaps in the sentence below.

 

Hint: you can use the same word twice

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
If Harry is predicting that his ice lollies will melt faster in warmer rooms and then he places them in rooms at similar temperatures, he's not really testing his prediction, is he? He needs to try different types of rooms: classrooms, corridors, receptions, hallways, kitchens, bedrooms etc.
  • Question 10

If there are 27 rooms in Harry's school, how many would you recommend he tests out for temperature differences?

CORRECT ANSWER
10
EDDIE SAYS
Obviously, the more the better! However, Harry has to factor various things into this: how long the investigation will take, how many people he has to get permission from, how much equipment is available, how many ice lollies he can afford - that sort of thing. So, 10 should be about right - it will give him sufficient data to test his prediction and he should have enough equipment for that. Great focus, that's another activity ticked off!
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