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The Periodic Table: Introduction

All the elements known to us are arranged in the Periodic Table. In this worksheet students will look at the Periodic Table and why it is so important.

'The Periodic Table: Introduction' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Chemistry: The Periodic Table

Curriculum subtopic:  Mendeleev The Periodic Table

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Everything in the world is made from very small particles called atoms. If all the atoms in a substance are the same, then it can be classed as an element.

Elements contain only ONE type of atom.

There are over 100 elements known to us, and scientists are still working hard to try and discover new elements. All the known elements are arranged in the Periodic Table (click on the image to see a larger version):

 

 

A Russian scientist named Dimitri Mendeleev developed the Periodic Table.

 

 

He realised that elements can be arranged in a regular pattern. He began to arrange the elements based on their atomic number, and group together elements which react in similar ways. This resulted in the Periodic Table, which can be found on the wall of almost every science lab in the world.

 

The Periodic Table lists all the elements in a specific order, to help us understand why elements react like they do and what properties they might have.

The Periodic Table is so well organised that all the metal elements are on the left hand side of the table and all the non-metals are on the right:

 

Approximately how many elements have been discovered?

less than 100

more than 100

more than 1000

From the list below, tick the SIX elements.

Sodium

Oxygen

Water

Steel

Plastic

Calcium

Lead

Gold

Hydrogen

Brass

Which THREE of the elements below are alkali metals?

Sodium

Oxygen

Caesium

Lithium

Hydrogen

By dragging the boxes from the right hand column, state whether the elements on the left are metal or non-metal.

Column A

Column B

Lithium
Non-metal
Hydrogen
Metal
Calcium
Non-metal
Magnesium
Non-metal
Sulphur
Metal
Fluorine
Metal

Everything in the world is made from.......

atoms

elements

compounds

What was the name of the scientist who developed the periodic table?

Isaac Newton

Albert Einstein

Dimitri Mendeleev

Drag the atomic numbers on the right to match the correct element symbol on the left.

Column A

Column B

Na
6
C
1
H
20
Li
3
Ca
11

Some of the element symbols come from the latin name for the elements. Which of the elements shown below has the latin name of plumbum?

Sodium

Lead

Potassium

There are only TWO liquid elements in the periodic table. Use the list below to identify which two they are.

Oxygen

Hydrogen

Mercury

Gold

Bromine

Aluminium

Match the group name on the left  to the group number on the right.

Column A

Column B

Alkali metals
7
Noble gases
1
Halogens
8
  • Question 1

Approximately how many elements have been discovered?

CORRECT ANSWER
more than 100
EDDIE SAYS
There are over 100 elements known and it is becoming increasingly difficult to discover new ones. However, scientists are still looking!
  • Question 2

From the list below, tick the SIX elements.

CORRECT ANSWER
Sodium
Oxygen
Calcium
Lead
Gold
Hydrogen
EDDIE SAYS
All elements are arranged in the periodic table. If they are not in the Periodic Table then they are not elements. Water is a compound containing both hydrogen and oxygen. Brass and steel are alloys, which contain mixtures of metals. Plastics contain lots of carbon atoms combined with other elements such as hydrogen.
  • Question 3

Which THREE of the elements below are alkali metals?

CORRECT ANSWER
Sodium
Caesium
Lithium
EDDIE SAYS
Sodium, caesium and lithium are all alkali metals. They react very strongly with water and caesium can even explode if placed in water.
  • Question 4

By dragging the boxes from the right hand column, state whether the elements on the left are metal or non-metal.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Lithium
Metal
Hydrogen
Non-metal
Calcium
Metal
Magnesium
Metal
Sulphur
Non-metal
Fluorine
Non-metal
EDDIE SAYS
All the metals are to the left of the periodic table and non-metals are to the right. Hydrogen is the only exception to this rule. It is on the left but is a non-metal.
  • Question 5

Everything in the world is made from.......

CORRECT ANSWER
atoms
EDDIE SAYS
Everything is made from atoms. If a material contains only one type of atom then it can be classed as an element. Compounds are made of two or more elements chemically joined.
  • Question 6

What was the name of the scientist who developed the periodic table?

CORRECT ANSWER
Dimitri Mendeleev
EDDIE SAYS
Dimitri Mendeleev was an incredible scientist, but a rather eccentric man. He had a hair cut and a shave only once per year in spring. This kept him cooler in the summer but warmer in the winter!
  • Question 7

Drag the atomic numbers on the right to match the correct element symbol on the left.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Na
11
C
6
H
1
Li
3
Ca
20
EDDIE SAYS
The atomic number gives us a lot of information about the atoms that each element contains. It is also very important to learn the symbols of all the elements.
  • Question 8

Some of the element symbols come from the latin name for the elements. Which of the elements shown below has the latin name of plumbum?

CORRECT ANSWER
Lead
EDDIE SAYS
The latin name for lead is plumbum. This is why it has the symbol Pb. Sodium and potassium also seem to have strange symbols because there symbol is based on their latin name.
  • Question 9

There are only TWO liquid elements in the periodic table. Use the list below to identify which two they are.

CORRECT ANSWER
Mercury
Bromine
EDDIE SAYS
Mercury and bromine are the only two elements that exist as liquids at room temperature.
  • Question 10

Match the group name on the left  to the group number on the right.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Alkali metals
1
Noble gases
8
Halogens
7
EDDIE SAYS
The periodic table has many groups. The three listed above are the most famous.
---- OR ----

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