The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Interesting Phrases: The Wind in the Willows 2

In this worksheet, students will read an extract from 'The Wind in the Willows' and find words and phrases that capture the reader's interest and imagination.

'Interesting Phrases: The Wind in the Willows 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:  Listen to and Discuss Texts

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This extract is part of a story called The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Read it several times to make sure you that you understand it.

 

*********************************

 

The Wind in the Willows

 

 

The Mole had been spring cleaning his underground home all morning. His fine coat was splattered with whitewash, and his arms were tired. From outside his underground home, he could hear the spring calling to him. Suddenly, he threw down his brush and cried, "Hang spring cleaning." 

He charged out of the house and scrabbled through the tunnel that led to the outside world. At last, POP, the Mole came out into the sunshine. The Mole ambled along until he came to a river. He'd never seen a river before. He was fascinated by the way the water gurgled and gleamed. Mole sat on the grass and gazed at the bank opposite until a dark hole caught his eye.

"What a fine home that would make!" he thought. As he continued looking at the hole, something twinkled at him. It was an eye. An eye that belonged to a little brown face. It was the Water Rat.

 

*********************************

 

 

Now use this extract to answer the following questions. Remember you can press HELP at any time to come back to this page. You can listen to and read the extract as many times as you like.

Mole is busy painting at the beginning of the extract. The writer uses an interesting adjective (describing word) to describe the mess that Mole has made.

What is the adjective?

spring cleaning

splattered

scrambled

Why does Mole stop his work and go outside? 

His arms are tired.

He is hungry.

He can hear the spring calling to him.

The writer uses three verbs (action or doing words) to show us that Mole rushes to get outside.

Type all three verbs below.

Mole walked along a river. Which verb describes the noise of the water?

gurgled

gleamed

The writer uses the verb gleamed to describe how the water is shining in the sunshine. Which other words could he have used?

Tick two boxes.

amazed

sparkled

crumbled

glistened

The story says that once outside, "The Mole ambled along".

Which word is ambled the opposite of? Use a dictionary to help, if you are unsure.

strolled

dashed

Why is Mole ambling?

He can see his friend.

He is enjoying his walk.

He has finished his painting.

Read these words:

BANG, tap, SPLASH, boooom

These words sound like the noise they describe. They are called onomatopoeic words.

 

Can you find the onomatopoeic word in the extract?

Type it below.

Which descriptive phrase tells us that Mole is interested in a hole that he sees on the riverbank?

It was an eye.

It caught his eye.

Read these sentences from the extract:

As he continued looking at the hole, something twinkled at him. It was an eye. An eye that belonged to a little brown face. It was the Water Rat.

 

The writer uses short quick descriptions to introduce us to the Water Rat. Why?

To keep us interested so we keep reading.

The writer can't think of any more words to use.

  • Question 1

Mole is busy painting at the beginning of the extract. The writer uses an interesting adjective (describing word) to describe the mess that Mole has made.

What is the adjective?

CORRECT ANSWER
splattered
EDDIE SAYS
"His fine coat was splattered with whitewash."
The word 'splattered' makes us think it is messy.
  • Question 2

Why does Mole stop his work and go outside? 

CORRECT ANSWER
He can hear the spring calling to him.
EDDIE SAYS
"He could hear the spring calling to him."
The writer uses this description to pretend that the outside is alive. This is called personification.
  • Question 3

The writer uses three verbs (action or doing words) to show us that Mole rushes to get outside.

Type all three verbs below.

CORRECT ANSWER
threw scrambled charged
threw charged scrambled
charged threw scrambled
charged scrambled threw
scrambled threw charged
scrambled charged threw
EDDIE SAYS
"he threw down his brush"... "He charged out of the house and scrabbled through the tunnel that led to the outside world."
These words help us see a picture in our heads of Mole rushing outside.
  • Question 4

Mole walked along a river. Which verb describes the noise of the water?

CORRECT ANSWER
gurgled
EDDIE SAYS
"the water gurgled"
The word 'gurgle' is a lovely sound, it shows us that Mole is enjoying listening to the river.
  • Question 5

The writer uses the verb gleamed to describe how the water is shining in the sunshine. Which other words could he have used?

Tick two boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
sparkled
glistened
EDDIE SAYS
'Sparkled' and 'glistened' are words that have a similar meaning to 'gleamed'. Again, the river is being described with words that make the reader think of pretty, pleasant objects, like silver jewels.
  • Question 6

The story says that once outside, "The Mole ambled along".

Which word is ambled the opposite of? Use a dictionary to help, if you are unsure.

CORRECT ANSWER
dashed
EDDIE SAYS
'Ambled' and 'strolled' both mean to walk or move at a slow, relaxed pace, and 'dashed' has the opposite meaning.
  • Question 7

Why is Mole ambling?

CORRECT ANSWER
He is enjoying his walk.
EDDIE SAYS
Mole is pleased to be outside and is enjoying his walk along the river. The writer chooses this word to help us understand how happy Mole is feeling.
  • Question 8

Read these words:

BANG, tap, SPLASH, boooom

These words sound like the noise they describe. They are called onomatopoeic words.

 

Can you find the onomatopoeic word in the extract?

Type it below.

CORRECT ANSWER
pop
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'POP' is a great word that describes the noise Mole makes when he comes out of his tunnel into the open.
  • Question 9

Which descriptive phrase tells us that Mole is interested in a hole that he sees on the riverbank?

CORRECT ANSWER
It caught his eye.
EDDIE SAYS
"Mole sat on the grass and gazed at the bank opposite until a dark hole caught his eye."
The writer uses this phrase to show us that Mole is really looking carefully at the hole.
  • Question 10

Read these sentences from the extract:

As he continued looking at the hole, something twinkled at him. It was an eye. An eye that belonged to a little brown face. It was the Water Rat.

 

The writer uses short quick descriptions to introduce us to the Water Rat. Why?

CORRECT ANSWER
To keep us interested so we keep reading.
EDDIE SAYS
The writer gives us little clues, so we have to work out what animal is coming out of the hole. The writer has chosen the word 'twinkling' to show us that is a friendly eye, not a scary monster!
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1