The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Compare Poems on a Similar Theme: 'The Months of the Year' and 'Months'

In this worksheet, students read two poems about the months of the year and answer questions on their content and structure.

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:  Recognise Forms of Poetry

Difficulty level:  

NEW! Try our assessments with your £1 trial
down

Here's a preview of the tutorial worksheet your child will complete. Sign up to EdPlace and access 1000s of worksheets that are marked automatically. With an account you can track progress and measure results.

QUESTION 1 of 10

In this worksheet, you can read two poems about the months of the year and compare them. The first is by Sara Coleridge, who was born in 1802 and died in 1852.

 

 

*******************

The months of the year

  

January brings the snow,

Makes our feet and fingers glow.

 

February brings the rain,

Thaws the frozen pond again.

 

March brings breezes, loud and shrill,

Stirs the dancing daffodil.

 

April brings the primrose sweet,

Scatters daisies at our feet.

 

May brings flocks of pretty lambs,

Skipping by their fleecy dams.

 

June brings tulips, liles, roses,

Fills the children's hands with posies.

 

Hot July brings cooling showers,

Strawberries and gilly-flowers.

 

August brings the sheaves of corn,

Then the harvest home is borne.

 

Warm September brings the fruit,

Sportsmen then begin to shoot.

 

Fresh October brings the pheasant;

Then to gather nuts is pleasant.

 

Dull November brings the blast,

Then the leaves are falling fast.

 

Chill December brings the sleet,

Blazing fire and Christmas treat.

 

*******************

 

 

The second poem is by Christina Rossetti, who was born in 1830 and died in 1894.

 

 

*******************

Months

 

January cold desolate;

February all dripping wet;

March wind ranges;

April changes;

Birds sing in tune

To flowers of May,

And sunny June

Brings longest day;

In scorched July

The storm-clouds fly

Lightning torn;

August bears corn,

September fruit;

In rough October

Earth must disrobe her;

Stars fall and shoot

In keen November;

And night is long

And cold is strong

In bleak December.

 

*******************

 

 

Read both poems a few times so that you are familiar with them, but remember that you can look back at them as often as you like by clicking the Help button.

The first three questions are about the Sara Coleridge poem.

 

The poem is divided into two line stanzas (verses) called couplets. Are they rhyming couplets or non-rhyming couplets?

rhyming couplets

non-rhyming couplets

Some of the stanzas begin with the name of the month, while others begin with an adjective that describes the month. Match the adjectives with the month they describe.

Column A

Column B

hot
November
warm
July
fresh
September
dull
October
chill
December

Because the poem was written a long time ago, there may be some words that you don't know, but it is often possible to work out the meaning of unfamiliar words from their context (the words around them). See if you can match up the words in the list with their meanings.

Column A

Column B

shrill
mothers
dams
carried
posies
sounding piercing and high-pitched
borne
small bunches

The next three questions are about the Christina Rossetti poem. Click on the Help button to go back and read it again.

 

It is not as easy to read as the Sara Coleridge poem, partly because it is not split up into two-line stanzas, but the rhyme scheme is also different. How are the rhymes arranged?

The poem is written in rhyming couplets.

Every first and third line rhyme with each other, and every second and fourth line rhyme with each other.

There are some rhyming couplets but in other parts of the poem it is alternate lines that rhyme.

When she describes January, Christina Rossetti uses an adjective that means sad and gloomy. Find it and copy it (as it appears in the poem) into the answer box.

When describing October, Christina Rossetti uses an old-fashioned verb meaning 'to undress'. She is probably referring to the trees losing their leaves and becoming bare. What is the word?

The next questions are about both poems.

 

Sara Coleridge and Christina Rossetti both describe the way the year changes as the months pass, but one poem presents positive images all the way through while the other one contains a mixture of happy and sad images.

 

Which poem is more positive?

the Sara Coleridge poem

the Christina Rossetti poem

The rhythm of one poem is more straightforward than the other. Try reading both poems out loud again. Which one has the same rhythm in every line?

the Sara Coleridge poem

the Christina Rossetti poem

  • Question 1

The first three questions are about the Sara Coleridge poem.

 

The poem is divided into two line stanzas (verses) called couplets. Are they rhyming couplets or non-rhyming couplets?

CORRECT ANSWER
rhyming couplets
EDDIE SAYS
In every couplet, the words at the ends of the lines rhyme with each other.
  • Question 2

Some of the stanzas begin with the name of the month, while others begin with an adjective that describes the month. Match the adjectives with the month they describe.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

hot
July
warm
September
fresh
October
dull
November
chill
December
EDDIE SAYS
Sara Coleridge probably did this to keep the rhythm of each line the same. The five months in this list have their stress on the second syllable (JuLY, SepTEMber, OcTOBer, NoVEMber, DeCEMber) instead of the first.
  • Question 3

Because the poem was written a long time ago, there may be some words that you don't know, but it is often possible to work out the meaning of unfamiliar words from their context (the words around them). See if you can match up the words in the list with their meanings.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

shrill
sounding piercing and high-pitche...
dams
mothers
posies
small bunches
borne
carried
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'dame' used to mean a woman or a mother. We still have pantomime dames.
  • Question 4

The next three questions are about the Christina Rossetti poem. Click on the Help button to go back and read it again.

 

It is not as easy to read as the Sara Coleridge poem, partly because it is not split up into two-line stanzas, but the rhyme scheme is also different. How are the rhymes arranged?

CORRECT ANSWER
There are some rhyming couplets but in other parts of the poem it is alternate lines that rhyme.
EDDIE SAYS
The poem begins with two rhyming couplets (for January, February, March and April) but then for May and June it is alternate lines that rhyme, and so on.
  • Question 5

When she describes January, Christina Rossetti uses an adjective that means sad and gloomy. Find it and copy it (as it appears in the poem) into the answer box.

CORRECT ANSWER
desolate
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'desolate' originally meant deserted or empty, but it has come to mean sad and lacking in comfort.
  • Question 6

When describing October, Christina Rossetti uses an old-fashioned verb meaning 'to undress'. She is probably referring to the trees losing their leaves and becoming bare. What is the word?

CORRECT ANSWER
disrobe
Disrobe
EDDIE SAYS
We still use the word 'robe' for a type of clothing.
  • Question 7

The next questions are about both poems.

 

Sara Coleridge and Christina Rossetti both describe the way the year changes as the months pass, but one poem presents positive images all the way through while the other one contains a mixture of happy and sad images.

 

Which poem is more positive?

CORRECT ANSWER
the Sara Coleridge poem
EDDIE SAYS
Even though Sara Coleridge describes bad weather and cold temperatures, she concentrates on positive images such as glowing fingers and blazing fires. Christina Rossetti uses adjectives like 'desolate' and 'bleak' to describe the winter months.
  • Question 8

The rhythm of one poem is more straightforward than the other. Try reading both poems out loud again. Which one has the same rhythm in every line?

CORRECT ANSWER
the Sara Coleridge poem
EDDIE SAYS
The Sara Coleridge poem stresses the first syllable of every line, with each line having four stresses (JANuARy BRINGS the SNOW, MAKES our FEET and FINGers GLOW). This makes it easier to read than the Christina Rossetti poem, which has a less definite rhythm.
Previous Next

Easy As 1-2-3

Have fun learning at home on our desktop website or on-the go with our app

Start your £1 trial today.

Terms apply