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Identify Different Patterns of Rhyme in Poetry

In this worksheet, students read different poems and identify the rhyme schemes used in them.

'Identify Different Patterns of Rhyme in Poetry' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Reading: Comprehension

Curriculum subtopic:  Recognise Forms of Poetry

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

A lot of poems rhyme, but there are many different ways of writing a rhyming poem.

 

 

In this poem the first and third lines rhyme with each other, and so do the second and fourth lines.

My dog eats bones

He chews them up

His name is Jones

He's just a pup.

 

Rhyming patterns can be given letter names to help us tell them apart. If we call the first rhyme (bones and Jones) A and the second rhyme (up and pupB then the rhyme scheme is ABAB.

My dog eats bones     A

He chews them up      B

His name is Jones      A

He's just a pup.           B

 

We can change the order of the lines around, which changes the rhyme scheme as well.

My dog eats bones     A

His name is Jones      A

He chews them up      B

He's just a pup.           B

The rhyme scheme is now AABB. When pairs of lines rhyme in this way they are called rhyming couplets. Rhyming couplets are a common form of verse.

 

Another common rhyme scheme is for the second and fourth lines only to rhyme.

My dog eats bones     A

He chews them up      B

He's really sweet        C

He's just a pup.           B

 

The third line is given the letter C because it ends with a new sound that does not rhyme with either of the first two lines. This rhyme scheme is called ABCB.

 

Giving letter names to the rhymes is a helpful way of describing them, but it can be confusing at first. When you are doing this activity, remember that you can look back at the introduction as often as you like by clicking the Help button.

Read this nursery rhyme and decide which rhyme scheme it follows.

 

Look at the last word of each line and decide which lines rhyme with each other.

 

One, two, three, four,

Mary at the cottage door,

Five, six, seven, eight,

Eating cherries off a plate.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this nursery rhyme?

 

Pease porridge hot,

Pease porridge cold,

Pease porridge in the pot,

Nine days old.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this nursery rhyme?

 

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean.

And so between the two of them,

They licked the platter clean.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Bye baby bunting,

Papa's gone a-hunting,

Gone to get a rabbit skin

To wrap the baby bunting in.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Yankee Doodle came to town,

Riding on a pony,

He stuck a feather in his cap

And called it macaroni.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

A wise old owl lived in an oak;

The more he saw the less he spoke;

The less he spoke the more he heard,

Why can't we all be like that wise old bird?

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall,

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.

All the King's horses and all the King's men

Couldn't put Humpty together again.

AABB

ABAB

ABCB

This is a more tricky one, as it has six lines instead of four! Read it carefully and try and work out the rhyme scheme.

 

Little Miss Muffet

Sat on a tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey;

There came a big spider,

Who sat down beside her

And frightened Miss Muffett away.

AABBCC

AABCBC

AABCCB

This verse has a word missing. It is meant to rhyme ABCB.

Read it through carefully and choose the correct word that fits both the rhyme and what is being said.

 

Go to bed late

Stay very small,

Go to bed early

Grow very ________.

ball

gate

tall

This verse has a word missing. It is meant to be a rhyming couplet.

Read it through carefully and choose the correct word that fits both the rhyme and what is being said.

In winter I get up at night

And dress by yellow candle-light.

In summer, quite the other _________,

I have to go to bed by day. 

 

 

white

play

way

  • Question 1

Read this nursery rhyme and decide which rhyme scheme it follows.

 

Look at the last word of each line and decide which lines rhyme with each other.

 

One, two, three, four,

Mary at the cottage door,

Five, six, seven, eight,

Eating cherries off a plate.

CORRECT ANSWER
AABB
EDDIE SAYS
The first and second lines ('four' and 'door') rhyme with each other, and so do the third and fourth lines ('eight' and 'plate'), so the rhyme scheme is AABB. These are rhyming couplets.
  • Question 2

What is the rhyme scheme for this nursery rhyme?

 

Pease porridge hot,

Pease porridge cold,

Pease porridge in the pot,

Nine days old.

CORRECT ANSWER
ABAB
EDDIE SAYS
The first and third lines ('hot' and 'pot') rhyme with each other, and so do the second and fourth lines ('cold' and 'old'), so the scheme is ABAB.
  • Question 3

What is the rhyme scheme for this nursery rhyme?

 

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean.

And so between the two of them,

They licked the platter clean.

CORRECT ANSWER
ABCB
EDDIE SAYS
Only the second and fourth lines rhyme this time, so the scheme is ABCB. The third line does not rhyme with the first line.
  • Question 4

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Bye baby bunting,

Papa's gone a-hunting,

Gone to get a rabbit skin

To wrap the baby bunting in.

CORRECT ANSWER
AABB
EDDIE SAYS
These are rhyming couplets.
  • Question 5

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Yankee Doodle came to town,

Riding on a pony,

He stuck a feather in his cap

And called it macaroni.

CORRECT ANSWER
ABCB
EDDIE SAYS
Only the second and fourth lines rhyme here.
  • Question 6

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

A wise old owl lived in an oak;

The more he saw the less he spoke;

The less he spoke the more he heard,

Why can't we all be like that wise old bird?

CORRECT ANSWER
AABB
EDDIE SAYS
These are rhyming couplets again. Did you notice that this poem finished with a question?
  • Question 7

What is the rhyme scheme for this one?

 

Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall,

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.

All the King's horses and all the King's men

Couldn't put Humpty together again.

CORRECT ANSWER
AABB
EDDIE SAYS
Humpty Dumpty has rhyming couplets too.
  • Question 8

This is a more tricky one, as it has six lines instead of four! Read it carefully and try and work out the rhyme scheme.

 

Little Miss Muffet

Sat on a tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey;

There came a big spider,

Who sat down beside her

And frightened Miss Muffett away.

CORRECT ANSWER
AABCCB
EDDIE SAYS
The first two lines rhyme with each other, so they are AA. The third and final lines rhyme with each other, so they are both called B. The fourth and fifth lines rhyme together so they are both called C.
  • Question 9

This verse has a word missing. It is meant to rhyme ABCB.

Read it through carefully and choose the correct word that fits both the rhyme and what is being said.

 

Go to bed late

Stay very small,

Go to bed early

Grow very ________.

CORRECT ANSWER
tall
EDDIE SAYS
The missing word is 'tall'. 'Ball' would have fit in with the rhyme scheme, however we also need the word to make sense in the poem.
  • Question 10

This verse has a word missing. It is meant to be a rhyming couplet.

Read it through carefully and choose the correct word that fits both the rhyme and what is being said.

In winter I get up at night

And dress by yellow candle-light.

In summer, quite the other _________,

I have to go to bed by day. 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
way
EDDIE SAYS
The missing word is 'way'. A rhyming couplet uses AABB.
---- OR ----

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