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Use Text Marking

In this worksheet, students will practice how to accurately text mark to improve understanding of a new text in preparation for the SATS reading paper.

'Use Text Marking ' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs English

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Text Marking

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

So you've decided you want to improve your skill of text marking!

A key skill in English is the ability to text mark.

Being able to text mark will help you when you are completing the SATs reading paper.

This activity will ask you to text mark a variety of different texts.

 

What is text marking?

 

Text marking ensures you are properly focusing on each of the 3 texts in the reading test paper.

 

It should involve highlighting, circling or underlining keywords or phrases in the text. 

 

You may also highlight similes and interesting language.

 

Text marking helps you to find the key features of a text and think about how it is set out.

 

Text marking should be done after you have read the text through at least twice.

 

When you are text marking, it can be helpful to highlight key dates, times and names of characters.

 

Another useful tip when text marking can be to write a quick heading next to each paragraph of the text to remind you what it is about, for example: 'she won the competition'.

 

Use only one colour when text marking so you don't get confused.

 

 

Over to you, time to have a go at some practice questions to help you text mark effectively in the SATs Reading paper.

 

 

girl reading a book

 

 

Questions 1-5 are a short story about a Year 7 girl's first day at secondary school.

 

 

 

 

Can you highlight the verbs in the text?

As Rachel put on her new shoes ready to go to King Edward’s School for the first time, her stomach seemed to perform several somersaults. Her father insisted she ate an early breakfast with him. Now the toast and jam felt like a hard lump in her throat.

Underline all adverbs in the text below.

“If I drop you off at the top of Yeats Road, then you’ll have plenty of time to casually walk the rest of the way to school,” said her mother. Mrs Jones taught at the Art College in West Road and was incredibly pleased to be close to Rachel’s school. Rachel’s older brother, Simon, was already at King Edward's School. Simon was in year 9: he had gone to call for his friends. Rachel’s younger brother went to stay with their neighbour, who was a child minder.

Can you highlight the word that is a synonym for 'last'?

On the way, Mrs Jones drove past Calshot Juniors, which was Rachel’s previous school. The school looked empty and then she caught sight of Miss Smith, her year 6 teacher. She quickly waved to Miss Smith and felt a little excited about wearing her new uniform and having been spotted. “There’s Miss Smith, Mum, do you remember the time she brought me home with my pet ferret?” enthused Rachel. “How could I forget!” laughed her mother, thinking of Rachel and her numerous hobbies from animals to train spotting and cookery. Mrs Jones had gritted her teeth when Rachel’s cake exploded in the oven, worried when Rachel went train spotting on her own and panicked when Rachel began collecting posters of strange animals and insects.

Can you highlight the names of any places that the students visited during the school holiday?

Suddenly the car stopped, “off you go then, have a good day” grinned Mrs Jones. As Rachel got out of the car she spotted Lia and Sanjay, her friends from primary school. “Hello, Rach, did you have a good holiday?” asked Sanjay. “Yes thanks, we went to our caravan in Wales, it’s near Barmouth,” answered Rachel. “We went to London. Do you know where we go first in school?” questioned Lia. “Yes, we go to the theatre to meet Mr Scott, the head of year 7 and our form tutors”, replied Rachel. “My form tutor is Miss Elcock, she teaches Art – that’s my favourite subject – who’s your tutor?”

Highlight all of the words the author uses to describe how a character is speaking.

“Mr Wyatt, I think,” muttered Lia looking worried. "What will you do at lunchtime?” asked Lia. “I’m going to the dining room for a cooked meal”, replied Rachel. “Me too, can I sit by you?” said Lia, "only Sanjay has brought sandwiches”. “Of course you can,” smiled Rachel. As the three approached school they saw groups of first years standing by a fountain. "This must be where we wait”, announced Sanjay.

Questions 6-8 are a fictional piece of writing about an imaginary creature, the Miptor.

 

Can you highlight the word that means to be 'cautious'?

Eating Habits of the Miptor: These creatures enjoy eating things that don’t require chewing because they are extremely lazy. Their favourite snacks are; live, wriggly maggots, leeches, spring green cabbage and red-hot chilli. You can also buy Miptor specialist, tasty snacks at any local gardening centre. Beware! They sometimes spit these out!

Can you highlight the word that means to be 'one of a kind?'

Training a Miptor Miptor’s usually only live until they are three years old and, during this time, cannot be completely toilet trained. Therefore don’t be surprised to find wet patches as this is not their fault. In fact, Miptor’s are unique in the fact that they can’t be trained to do anything. Just let them run free!

Can you highlight all of the sentence openers about the Miptor's habits?

Habits of a Miptor Firstly, Miptor’s have a lot of unusual and strange habits and, most of the time, very annoying ones too. Undoubtedly, the worst one is biting humans’ toes and fingernails. Furthermore, they make a lot of mess if they become free of their cage. When they get cross or grumpy, they stick their tongue out at you, so don’t get offended.

Read this extract that describes London during World War II.

 

Can you highlight the two words that show what has happened to the windows during the Second World War?

As usual, the evening is in total, frightening darkness. The only lights that can be seen are the small, searching torches in people's hands. Looking around, the windows are all blacked out with vital, small crosses over the windows. There is a lack of people moving about, hardly surprising given what may happen tonight. The only noise is that of the large, red bus rumbling along quietly on it's journey.

Read this extract that describes London during World War II?

 

Can you identify the words that describe the bombs that were dropped during World War II?

Soon the sirens (which are blaring out loudly) break the silence. The calm and quiet gets disturbed by chaos and panic. People - who are out and about on the streets - are running to the public, underground shelter. Inside, there are lots of people searching for a suitable, comfortable bunk bed for the night. In addition, others are receiving a warm, soothing cup of tea after coming in from the cold of the night air. Everybody is carrying their small, brown box containing their vital, lifesaving gas mask. People, who are talking happily because noise is allowed down here, feel a lot safer than being up on the street. The constant chatter is dropped by the loud, crashing sound of the bombs dropping dangerously above. The walls and roof shake terribly with the power of the deadly, atrocious bombs!
  • Question 1

Questions 1-5 are a short story about a Year 7 girl's first day at secondary school.

 

 

 

 

Can you highlight the verbs in the text?

CORRECT ANSWER
As Rachel put on her new shoes ready to go to King Edward’s School for the first time, her stomach seemed to perform several somersaults. Her father insisted she ate an early breakfast with him. Now the toast and jam felt like a hard lump in her throat.
EDDIE SAYS
How did you find this first question? Hopefully, you found the 6 verbs within the text. Think of a verb as a doing word and be careful to look for each one, regardless of its tense! Before the SATs reading test, it's crucial that you understand the difference between each of the word classes.
  • Question 2

Underline all adverbs in the text below.

CORRECT ANSWER
“If I drop you off at the top of Yeats Road, then you’ll have plenty of time to casually walk the rest of the way to school,” said her mother. Mrs Jones taught at the Art College in West Road and was incredibly pleased to be close to Rachel’s school.

Rachel’s older brother, Simon, was already at King Edward's School. Simon was in year 9: he had gone to call for his friends. Rachel’s younger brother went to stay with their neighbour, who was a child minder.
EDDIE SAYS
How are you getting on? Did you manage to locate the two adverbs within the text? An adverb describes a verb and adds depth to your writing. Text marking adverbs within the SATs reading paper will help you to understand the writing and the meaning of the verbs used. You've made a strong start, let's push on.
  • Question 3

Can you highlight the word that is a synonym for 'last'?

CORRECT ANSWER
On the way, Mrs Jones drove past Calshot Juniors, which was Rachel’s previous school. The school looked empty and then she caught sight of Miss Smith, her year 6 teacher. She quickly waved to Miss Smith and felt a little excited about wearing her new uniform and having been spotted.

“There’s Miss Smith, Mum, do you remember the time she brought me home with my pet ferret?” enthused Rachel.

“How could I forget!” laughed her mother, thinking of Rachel and her numerous hobbies from animals to train spotting and cookery. Mrs Jones had gritted her teeth when Rachel’s cake exploded in the oven, worried when Rachel went train spotting on her own and panicked when Rachel began collecting posters of strange animals and insects.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you find this question easier or more challenging? Did you manage to find the word 'previous'? It means the same as 'last'. Remember text marking is a great way to focus on understanding the text you are reading, which then means you will be able to show how well you have understood it when it is time to answer questions.
  • Question 4

Can you highlight the names of any places that the students visited during the school holiday?

CORRECT ANSWER
Suddenly the car stopped, “off you go then, have a good day” grinned Mrs Jones. As Rachel got out of the car she spotted Lia and Sanjay, her friends from primary school.
“Hello, Rach, did you have a good holiday?” asked Sanjay.
“Yes thanks, we went to our caravan in Wales, it’s near Barmouth,” answered Rachel.
“We went to London. Do you know where we go first in school?” questioned Lia.
“Yes, we go to the theatre to meet Mr Scott, the head of year 7 and our form tutors”, replied Rachel.
“My form tutor is Miss Elcock, she teaches Art that’s my favourite subject who’s your tutor?”
EDDIE SAYS
Great job if you highlighted Wales, Barmouth and London. Rachel visited Barmouth, in Wales and Lia explained that she visited London. These kind of text marking challenge you to find vocabulary you may not have heard of or used before. Read each sentence carefully and look for words that can help you to work out the meanings of these unfamiliar words.
  • Question 5

Highlight all of the words the author uses to describe how a character is speaking.

CORRECT ANSWER
“Mr Wyatt, I think,” muttered Lia looking worried.
"What will you do at lunchtime?” asked Lia.
“I’m going to the dining room for a cooked meal”, replied Rachel.
“Me too, can I sit by you?” said Lia, "only Sanjay has brought sandwiches”.
“Of course you can,” smiled Rachel.

As the three approached school they saw groups of first years standing by a fountain.
"This must be where we wait”, announced Sanjay.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you spot that the author has used 6 different words to describe how a character spoke within the text? When answering a question in the reading test, take your time to read each question twice and always check your answer over. It can be very easy to miss a word when answering a question like this! You are halfway through this activity- keep it up!
  • Question 6

Questions 6-8 are a fictional piece of writing about an imaginary creature, the Miptor.

 

Can you highlight the word that means to be 'cautious'?

CORRECT ANSWER
Eating Habits of the Miptor:

These creatures enjoy eating things that don’t require chewing because they are extremely lazy. Their favourite snacks are; live, wriggly maggots, leeches, spring green cabbage and red-hot chilli. You can also buy Miptor specialist, tasty snacks at any local gardening centre. Beware! They sometimes spit these out!
EDDIE SAYS
Great focus, keep it up! Did you manage to recognise and underline 'beware'? When answering any SATS questions, make sure you read the question carefully and do exactly as it asks. This question asked for only a word to be highlighted, so be sure to do just that!
  • Question 7

Can you highlight the word that means to be 'one of a kind?'

CORRECT ANSWER
Training a Miptor

Miptor’s usually only live until they are three years old and, during this time, cannot be completely toilet trained. Therefore don’t be surprised to find wet patches as this is not their fault. In fact, Miptor’s are unique in the fact that they can’t be trained to do anything. Just let them run free!
EDDIE SAYS
Nice job if you chose 'unique'. Text marking can be done with any type of text; it can help us to look in more detail at characters or events that have taken place.
  • Question 8

Can you highlight all of the sentence openers about the Miptor's habits?

CORRECT ANSWER
Habits of a Miptor

Firstly, Miptor’s have a lot of unusual and strange habits and, most of the time, very annoying ones too. Undoubtedly, the worst one is biting humans’ toes and fingernails. Furthermore, they make a lot of mess if they become free of their cage. When they get cross or grumpy, they stick their tongue out at you, so don’t get offended.
EDDIE SAYS
Great work if you spotted that there are 4 different sentence openers. Text marking encourages you to pick up new vocabulary that you can later include in your own writing. Using a range of sentence openers helps to add variety and interest to a piece of writing.
  • Question 9

Read this extract that describes London during World War II.

 

Can you highlight the two words that show what has happened to the windows during the Second World War?

CORRECT ANSWER
As usual, the evening is in total, frightening darkness. The only lights that can be seen are the small, searching torches in people's hands. Looking around, the windows are all blacked out with vital, small crosses over the windows. There is a lack of people moving about, hardly surprising given what may happen tonight. The only noise is that of the large, red bus rumbling along quietly on it's journey.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you find that the windows were 'blacked out'? This was to stop any light seeping through curtains, which could alert the enemy to where buildings were to aim dangerous bombs during World War II.
  • Question 10

Read this extract that describes London during World War II?

 

Can you identify the words that describe the bombs that were dropped during World War II?

CORRECT ANSWER
Soon the sirens (which are blaring out loudly) break the silence. The calm and quiet gets disturbed by chaos and panic. People - who are out and about on the streets - are running to the public, underground shelter. Inside, there are lots of people searching for a suitable, comfortable bunk bed for the night. In addition, others are receiving a warm, soothing cup of tea after coming in from the cold of the night air. Everybody is carrying their small, brown box containing their vital, lifesaving gas mask. People, who are talking happily because noise is allowed down here, feel a lot safer than being up on the street. The constant chatter is dropped by the loud, crashing sound of the bombs dropping dangerously above. The walls and roof shake terribly with the power of the deadly, atrocious bombs!
EDDIE SAYS
Remember to keep trying until you get it right! The two adjectives used to describe the bombs dropped during World War II, are 'deadly' and 'atrocious'. Using two adjectives before a noun makes your sentence a lot more interesting, e.g. 'deadly, atrocious bombs' or 'vital, lifesaving gas mask'. Brilliant work. We hope you've improved your ability to text mark a variety of texts as using this skill will help you to better understand texts presented in the SATs reading paper.
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