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Understand How to Apply Comprehension Skills to a Given Poetry Text

In this worksheet, students will be required to use a range of comprehension skills in order to answer questions about a poetry text in preparation for the SATs reading test.

'Understand How to Apply Comprehension Skills to a Given Poetry Text' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs English

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Poetry Questions

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

So, you've decided to spend some time practising for the SATs reading test.

In the SATs reading test, there will be three different texts to answer questions on.

 

One of the texts may be a poem, therefore you will feel more prepared if you spend some time reading a range of poetry. 

The poetry questions in the test will be similar to those used in reference to a fictional text.

 

Let's recap the different types of questions:

 

Text marking to answer 'right there' questions

Text marking is the skill you should first use when you read the poem, highlight or circle keywords and phrases. 

This strategy will then help you to answer some of the more simple, literal questions that have the answer 'right there', for example question that ask you to, 'find the phrase that' or to 'copy the group of words that'.

 

Word questions

This type of question will require that you give or explain the meaning of a word in a text. 

You may find you have already text marked the word!

 

Retrieval questions

Retrieval questions often begin with, 'who', 'what', 'where', 'when', 'why' and 'how'.

Sometimes you may very easily spot the answer, other times, it may be more difficult, and you may have to carefully search the text.

Although it can be tempting, do not guess. Always carefully check the answer, by finding evidence in the text.

 

Inference questions

To answer an inference question, you will need to look for clues.

You will need to prove your answer by asking yourself what evidence there is to support a particular claim? How do you know a certain statement to be true?

Use 'because' in your answer to demonstrate the evidence you have identified in the text.

Look carefully at the number of marks available for the question, two marks mean two pieces of evidence are needed. Three marks mean three pieces of evidence required and so on.

 

Right, now it's over to you now to answer a range of questions based on 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth, published in 1807.

You should always refer to your own text when working through these examples. These quotations are for reference only.

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

 

What is the name of the person who writes a fictional piece of work, like a poem?

Illustrator

Author

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze."

 

 

 

 

Which literary device has been used in the first line of the poem?

"I wandered lonely as a cloud..."

 

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance."

 

 

Focus on this line from the second verse:

"Tossing their heads in sprightly dance..."

 

Which type of literary device has William used here?

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

How does the narrator of the poem feel about the daffodils? (2 marks)

 

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

In the final verse, the narrator describes how he can have a 'vacant or pensive mood'. (2 marks)

What do you think this means?

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

Look at the final verse of Daffodils.

Complete the pairs of rhyming words.

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

Look at this final verse.

What do you think the poet means by "inward eye?" (1 mark)

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."


 

Which extract from the poem shows an example of hyperbole?

"Continuous as the stars..."

"Shine, line, way, bay..."

"Tossing their heads..."

"...stretched in never-ending line..."

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:"

 

 

Look at verse 3 from Daffodils

Which type of literary device has been used in the final line?

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

William Wordsworth wrote this poem in the 19th century.

At this time, people thought it was very important to connect with nature, they found beauty and comfort in natural things.

The daffodils made a big impression on William and his "inward eye".

 

Can you describe something you have seen in nature that has made you feel this way? (You can refer to animals, the weather, plants or trees that which grow etc).

(2 marks)

  • Question 1

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

 

What is the name of the person who writes a fictional piece of work, like a poem?

CORRECT ANSWER
Author
EDDIE SAYS
Simple start you get you warmed up. The author is the person who creates a fictional piece of work and in the case of 'Daffodils', is William Wordsworth.
  • Question 2

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze."

 

 

 

 

Which literary device has been used in the first line of the poem?

"I wandered lonely as a cloud..."

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Simile
A simile
EDDIE SAYS
Well spotted if you wrote 'simile'. A simile is a figure of speech used to compare one thing to another. Using a simile helps to make the writing more vivid, bringing it to life.
  • Question 3

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance."

 

 

Focus on this line from the second verse:

"Tossing their heads in sprightly dance..."

 

Which type of literary device has William used here?

CORRECT ANSWER
Personification
EDDIE SAYS
Personification is a powerful literary device and figure of speech in which a writer describes something by comparing it to a person. In this way, an object is given 'human-like' qualities and brought to life in the reader's mind.
  • Question 4

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

How does the narrator of the poem feel about the daffodils? (2 marks)

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
It is clear that the narrator of the poem thoroughly enjoys the sight of the daffodils and they bring him great joy. Remember to always provide evidence to support your answer. Some evidence of the narrator's delight in the daffodils is: The speaker enjoys watching the daffodils and takes delight in them. He calls them “golden” and describes how they “out-did” the water’s waves. He also states that a poet “could not be but gay.” He couldn’t help but feel happy while looking at the daffodils. The speaker also describes how when he is alone, the memory of the daffodils fills his heart with pleasure. You're making brilliant progress- keep going!
  • Question 5

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

In the final verse, the narrator describes how he can have a 'vacant or pensive mood'. (2 marks)

What do you think this means?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Don't worry if you struggled with the meaning of the words "vacant" and "pensive". Vacant means empty. Pensive means thoughtful or reflective.
  • Question 6

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

Look at the final verse of Daffodils.

Complete the pairs of rhyming words.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
How did you find this? Throughout 'Daffodils', William Wordsworth uses rhyme. Rhyme helps to make a poem musical and give it a strong rhythm. When you read a poem aloud, it has a pleasing effect if it has a strong rhyme pattern. You are now over halfway through this activity, keep it up!
  • Question 7

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

 

Look at this final verse.

What do you think the poet means by "inward eye?" (1 mark)

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
In this text "inward eye" refers to the narrator's memories.
  • Question 8

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."


 

Which extract from the poem shows an example of hyperbole?

CORRECT ANSWER
"...stretched in never-ending line..."
EDDIE SAYS
Nice job, if you chose "stretched in never-ending line". A hyperbole is a literary statement or claim that is exaggerated and not meant to be taken literally. For example, "I'm so hungry I could eat a horse."
  • Question 9

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:"

 

 

Look at verse 3 from Daffodils

Which type of literary device has been used in the final line?

CORRECT ANSWER
Alliteration
EDDIE SAYS
Phew, that was a toughie! William Wordsworth has used alliteration in the final line, with the words "what wealth". Alliteration is when words begin with the same sounds or letters. Alliteration helps us to focus on a particular part of the writing and can also add to the rhythm and mood of the poem.
  • Question 10

'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Published in 1807

 

"I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

 

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

 

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

 

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils."

 

William Wordsworth wrote this poem in the 19th century.

At this time, people thought it was very important to connect with nature, they found beauty and comfort in natural things.

The daffodils made a big impression on William and his "inward eye".

 

Can you describe something you have seen in nature that has made you feel this way? (You can refer to animals, the weather, plants or trees that which grow etc).

(2 marks)

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Great work, that's another activity completed and you're now even more prepared for the SATs reading test!
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