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Using Homophones and Homonyms

In this worksheet, pupils will rehearse how to use homophones and other words that are easily confused correctly. This exercise will help the pupil to feel more prepared for the SATs SPAG test.

'Using Homophones and Homonyms' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs English

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Spellings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Great job! You have decided to spend some time practising for your SPAG test.

 

In this activity, you will recap the meaning of homophones and homonyms and practice answering some questions to help you to feel more prepared for the SPAG test.

 

What is a homophone?

Homophones are groups of words that sound the same when you say them but have different meanings and spellings.

The word 'homophone' even means one sound!

There are not any set rules to help us to remember homophones, instead, we have to learn them and remember when to use them.

 

For example, check and cheque.

These homophones sound the same but mean different things.

Check = to examine something to determine its quality/ condition.

Cheque = an order given to a bank to pay someone a sum of money.

 

Tricky homophones:

Some homophones are a little trickier than others because there are more than two in the group and/or it can be difficult to remember which one to use in the correct context!

 

For example:

there  their  they're

 

There  = in, at or to that place/ position.

Their = a belonging associated with a person or thing.

They're = the contraction for 'they are'.

 

Another Example:

Tree bark and dog bark

 

tree bark         dog

 

or pen (a place to hold animals) and pen (a tool to write with).

 

Over to you now to have a go at some practice questions...good luck!

 

Can you write the correct homophone to label the pictures?

 

stars and moon   cavalier 

Picture A                                                               Picture B

Can you write the correct homophone to label the pictures?

 

  rabbitwig 

Picture A                                                                     Picture B

Can you choose the correct homophone for the sentence?

 

The cat got her tale/tail caught in the doorway.

 

Can you choose the correct homophone for the sentence?

 

Unfortunately, the old man had lost all of his money and so he was pour/poor/paw.

 

The word below has a homophone, can you write it into the box?

 

right

The word below has a homophone, can you write it into the box?

 

plane

 

Can you insert the missing homonym into each of the blank spaces in the sentences?

 

Can you insert the missing homonym into each of the blank spaces in the sentences?

 

'Duck' is a homonym.

 

Can you write two sentences for this homonym, demonstrating different meanings?

'Saw' is a homonym.

 

Can you write two sentences for this homonym, demonstrating different meanings?

 

  • Question 1

Can you write the correct homophone to label the pictures?

 

stars and moon   cavalier 

Picture A                                                               Picture B

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
That's a good start! Remember when completing a spelling question to sound out the word and break it into syllables to help you to place each letter in the correct position. Night and knight are homophones, sounding the same but with a different spelling and meaning.
  • Question 2

Can you write the correct homophone to label the pictures?

 

  rabbitwig 

Picture A                                                                     Picture B

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Did you manage to spell the pair of homophones correctly? There are hundreds of homophones in the English language and they can often be the reason we make spelling errors. Keep going - you are doing well!
  • Question 3

Can you choose the correct homophone for the sentence?

 

The cat got her tale/tail caught in the doorway.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
tail
EDDIE SAYS
How are you doing? Did you spot that the correct homophone for this sentence is 'tail'? Tale means a narrative or story that can be fictional or true.
  • Question 4

Can you choose the correct homophone for the sentence?

 

Unfortunately, the old man had lost all of his money and so he was pour/poor/paw.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
poor
EDDIE SAYS
Are you feeling more confident? There were 3 options to choose from...the correct homophone is 'poor'. 'Pour' means for liquid to flow rapidly and steadily. 'Paw' is an animal's foot with claws and pads.
  • Question 5

The word below has a homophone, can you write it into the box?

 

right

CORRECT ANSWER
write
EDDIE SAYS
Don't be afraid to give it a go...you never know! The homophone for 'right' is 'write'. 'Right' can mean morally good or the direction to travel. 'Write' means to mark letters, words or symbols on paper.
  • Question 6

The word below has a homophone, can you write it into the box?

 

plane

 

CORRECT ANSWER
plain
EDDIE SAYS
Great work if you spotted that the homophone for 'plane' is 'plain'. 'Plane' means a flat surface or an airborne object. 'Plain' means simple or basic. You are doing well- keep going! By practising using homophones, you are understanding the relationship between spelling and sound, which in turn will make you a better writer!
  • Question 7

Can you insert the missing homonym into each of the blank spaces in the sentences?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Nice job if you chose the homonym 'point' to fill each gap. Remember that a homonym is a word that is the same as another in sound and usually spelling but has a different meaning.
  • Question 8

Can you insert the missing homonym into each of the blank spaces in the sentences?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Great effort! The homonym is 'wave' and when used here, means something completely different in each sentence! You are working hard, keep going!
  • Question 9

'Duck' is a homonym.

 

Can you write two sentences for this homonym, demonstrating different meanings?

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
In this question, the pupil will be expected to write 2 sentences. It is representative of the type of question that may appear in the SATS SPAG test. Each sentence will receive one mark, to demonstrate knowledge of the different meanings of the homonym 'duck'. For example: 'duck' can describe a waterbird or avoid by moving quickly. Keep going, you are nearly at the end of the activity!
  • Question 10

'Saw' is a homonym.

 

Can you write two sentences for this homonym, demonstrating different meanings?

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Again, the pupil will be expected to write 2 sentences. It is representative of the type of question that may appear in the SATS SPAG test. Each sentence will receive one mark, to demonstrate knowledge of the different meanings of the homonym 'saw'. For example: 'saw' can describe a hand tool for cutting wood or to describe the action of 'seeing' something. Well done, that's another activity completed! We hope you have improved your knowledge of homophones and homonyms.
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