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Revise Your Semi-Colons: Joining Clauses and Sentences

In this worksheet, students revise how to use semi-colons to join clauses and sentences.

'Revise Your Semi-Colons: Joining Clauses and Sentences' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:   Grammar and Vocabulary

Curriculum subtopic:   Extend and Apply Grammatical Knowledge

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Semi-colons can be used to join two separate sentences that are on the same theme.

for example:

It was bitterly cold. Josie's nose was tingling.

 

These sentences are fine as they are, but because the meaning of the second sentence is closely linked to the meaning of the first one, we can join them with a semi-colon.

It was bitterly cold; Josie's nose was tingling.

 

It is not correct to join two sentences like this with a comma. This is a very common mistake.

It was bitterly cold, Josie's nose was tingling. (wrong)

 

A semi-colon can replace a conjunction in compound and complex sentences.

for example:

My mum is forty but my dad is forty two.

My mum is forty; my dad is forty two.

 

Both these sentences are correct, but using a semi-colon adds variety to writing, making it more interesting. The reader understands the word 'but' even though it is not actually there.

 

Again, it is not correct to use a comma to join two clauses in this way.

My mum is forty, my dad is forty two. (wrong)

Join these two sentences, using a semi-colon.

 

Martha wasn't very hungry. However, she tried to eat her dinner.

Join these two sentences, using a semi-colon.


Jason is my brother. Kayleigh is my sister.

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I really enjoyed our meeting. It was a pleasure talking to you.


2) I really enjoyed our meeting; it was a pleasure talking to you.

sentence 1

sentence 2

both are correct

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I thought the first book was good; the sequel was boring.


2) I thought the first book was good, the sequel was boring.

sentence 1

sentence 2

both are correct

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I was tired of waiting. He wasn't coming.


2) I was tired of waiting; he wasn't coming.

sentence 1

sentence 2

both are correct

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) My baby sister loves her teddy, she carries it with her all the time.


2) My baby sister loves her teddy; she carries it with her all the time.

sentence 1

sentence 2

both are correct

Replace the conjunction in this sentence with a semi-colon.

 

Lily read her book while I played on my computer.

Replace the conjunction in this sentence with a semi-colon.

 

You haven't done your homework so you can't go out tonight.

The following sentence uses a semi-colon to replace a conjunction. Tick the conjunction that is implied even though it isn't there.

 

I listened quietly; Joe talked non-stop.

so

before

because

whereas

Which conjunction is implied this time?

 

I love all dogs; my favourite breed is a spaniel.

because

but

if

since

  • Question 1

Join these two sentences, using a semi-colon.

 

Martha wasn't very hungry. However, she tried to eat her dinner.

CORRECT ANSWER
Martha wasn't very hungry; however, she tried to eat her dinner.
  • Question 2

Join these two sentences, using a semi-colon.


Jason is my brother. Kayleigh is my sister.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jason is my brother; Kayleigh is my sister.
  • Question 3

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I really enjoyed our meeting. It was a pleasure talking to you.


2) I really enjoyed our meeting; it was a pleasure talking to you.

CORRECT ANSWER
both are correct
EDDIE SAYS
These sentences make sense either as separate sentences or linked with a semi-colon.
  • Question 4

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I thought the first book was good; the sequel was boring.


2) I thought the first book was good, the sequel was boring.

CORRECT ANSWER
sentence 1
EDDIE SAYS
Two separate sentences would also work, but it is not correct to join them with a comma.
  • Question 5

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) I was tired of waiting. He wasn't coming.


2) I was tired of waiting; he wasn't coming.

CORRECT ANSWER
both are correct
  • Question 6

Read these sentences and decide which one is correctly punctuated.

 

1) My baby sister loves her teddy, she carries it with her all the time.


2) My baby sister loves her teddy; she carries it with her all the time.

CORRECT ANSWER
sentence 2
EDDIE SAYS
The two sentences can be joined, but not with a comma.
  • Question 7

Replace the conjunction in this sentence with a semi-colon.

 

Lily read her book while I played on my computer.

CORRECT ANSWER
Lily read her book; I played on my computer.
  • Question 8

Replace the conjunction in this sentence with a semi-colon.

 

You haven't done your homework so you can't go out tonight.

CORRECT ANSWER
You haven't done your homework; you can't go out tonight.
  • Question 9

The following sentence uses a semi-colon to replace a conjunction. Tick the conjunction that is implied even though it isn't there.

 

I listened quietly; Joe talked non-stop.

CORRECT ANSWER
whereas
  • Question 10

Which conjunction is implied this time?

 

I love all dogs; my favourite breed is a spaniel.

CORRECT ANSWER
but
---- OR ----

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