The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Reading Fiction: The Hound of the Baskervilles

In this worksheet, students read an extract from The Hound of the Baskervilles and explain how the writer creates an atmosphere.

'Reading Fiction: The Hound of the Baskervilles' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Understand Meaning

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

First, read this extract from Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles, by Arthur Conan Doyle:

 

We had left the fertile country behind and beneath us. We looked
back on it now, the slanting rays of a low sun turning the
streams to threads of gold and glowing on the red earth new
turned by the plough and the broad tangle of the woodlands. The
road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder over huge russet and
olive slopes, sprinkled with giant boulders. Now and then we
passed a moorland cottage, walled and roofed with stone, with no
creeper to break its harsh outline. Suddenly we looked down into
a cup-like depression, patched with stunted oaks and firs which
had been twisted and bent by the fury of years of storm. Two
high, narrow towers rose over the trees. The driver pointed with
his whip.

"Baskerville Hall," said he.

 

 

Next, we will go through some questions about how the writer creates an atmosphere within the text. You can read it again at any time by clicking on the Help button.

Match up the quotes from the extract with the explanation of what they mean. Hover your mouse over the explanations to see them in full.

Column A

Column B

fertile
lots of things grow there
russet
a reddish-brown colour
depression
a dip in the earth

Re-read the description of the "fertile" country behind the travellers and the "road ahead" of them. Fill in the matrix grid:

 Fertile country behind The road ahead
beautiful sunset
crops growing
stony ground
moorland
no food growing
streams flowing

A good technique when writing essays is to pick out a single word from a longer quotation and explain it further.

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is little growing, and few people living here.

 

Write the missing word in the answer box below.

Again, write the missing word from the sentence below in the answer box:

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is an element of threat or danger, that anything could happen to the travellers.

Why would the moorland cottages need to be be "walled and roofed with stone"?

Because the weather up there would be bad so they would need to be strong.

Because the people could not afford wood.

Because they did not thatch in that area.

The trees near the Hall are twisted with "the fury of years of storm". Which technique is the writer using here to create an atmosphere? Write the word in the answer box below.

The first description we are given of Baskerville Hall itself is of the "high, narrow towers". What kind of image does this description suggest? Tick three boxes.

welcoming

spooky

intimidating

comfortable

foreboding

When the driver points with his whip, it adds to the tense, foreboding atmosphere as he seems to wish to distance himself from the place himself. The word "___________" also has connotations of threat or even violence.

driver

pointed

whip

  • Question 1

Match up the quotes from the extract with the explanation of what they mean. Hover your mouse over the explanations to see them in full.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

fertile
lots of things grow there
russet
a reddish-brown colour
depression
a dip in the earth
EDDIE SAYS
Fertile is defined as a plot of land which is capable of producing a large amount of vegetation.
Russet is defined as something which is reddish brown in colour.
Depression means the act of pressing something down or lowering something. So, here, it refers to a dip in the earth's surface.
  • Question 2

Re-read the description of the "fertile" country behind the travellers and the "road ahead" of them. Fill in the matrix grid:

CORRECT ANSWER
 Fertile country behind The road ahead
beautiful sunset
crops growing
stony ground
moorland
no food growing
streams flowing
EDDIE SAYS
The 'fertile' country behind them is beautiful and bountiful, with crops growing and streams flowing.
However, the road ahead is wild and stoney, with no crops growing so no sign of food for the travellers.
  • Question 3

A good technique when writing essays is to pick out a single word from a longer quotation and explain it further.

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is little growing, and few people living here.

 

Write the missing word in the answer box below.

CORRECT ANSWER
bleaker
EDDIE SAYS
The word 'bleak', when referring to an area of land, is defined as exposed to the elements and lacking in crops and vegetation. This supports the statement that the scene portrayed by the author is growing more barren and wild as the travellers progress.
  • Question 4

Again, write the missing word from the sentence below in the answer box:

 

The writer creates the atmosphere of an increasingly barren scene: "The road in front of us grew bleaker and wilder". The word ___________ here suggests that there is an element of threat or danger, that anything could happen to the travellers.

CORRECT ANSWER
wilder
EDDIE SAYS
Wilder is the correct word here. The atmosphere created by the author is growing increasingly less familiar for the travellers, so describing the surroundings as 'wild' adds a sense of danger to the scene.
  • Question 5

Why would the moorland cottages need to be be "walled and roofed with stone"?

CORRECT ANSWER
Because the weather up there would be bad so they would need to be strong.
EDDIE SAYS
The moorland would be exposed to the elements, so the cottages would need to be built to withstand strong winds and heavy rainfall.
  • Question 6

The trees near the Hall are twisted with "the fury of years of storm". Which technique is the writer using here to create an atmosphere? Write the word in the answer box below.

CORRECT ANSWER
personification
EDDIE SAYS
The writer is using personification; a storm cannot be angry or express fury, that is an emotion the writer has given it.
  • Question 7

The first description we are given of Baskerville Hall itself is of the "high, narrow towers". What kind of image does this description suggest? Tick three boxes.

CORRECT ANSWER
spooky
intimidating
foreboding
EDDIE SAYS
The description creates a sense of fear and intimidation. The fact that the towers are visible across the moor suggests that it is an imposing building, and this instills a sense of foreboding in the reader.
  • Question 8

When the driver points with his whip, it adds to the tense, foreboding atmosphere as he seems to wish to distance himself from the place himself. The word "___________" also has connotations of threat or even violence.

CORRECT ANSWER
whip
EDDIE SAYS
Whips were generally used for flogging an animal, such as a horse pulling a carriage, to urge it onwards. They were also used for beating animals and humans, so they evoke connotations of torture and fear.
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Get started
laptop

Start your £1 trial today.
Subscribe from £10/month.