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Air Around Us

In this worksheet, students will use their understanding of materials to answer questions about the gas all around us - air.

'Air Around Us' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  States of Matter

Curriculum subtopic:  Solids, Liquids and Gases

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Windy day

 

Air is all around us, we can feel it and see the effects it has on objects in our environment. Air is made up of particles (very small pieces), just like other materials.

Air is a mixture of gases which are vital for photosynthesis and respiration.

 

High speed train

 

Battling against the wind uses lots of energy, so vehicle designers use shapes which reduce wind resistance, like this high-speed train.

 

Box under parachute

 

Air can also be a very useful material. Without a parachute, objects would accelerate to the ground and smash.

 

Let's have a closer look at the air around us.

What kind of material is air?

solid

liquid

gas

Air is a colourless gas, but we can see its effects.

 

Which THREE of these movements are caused by air particles?

flapping flag

waves in the sea

flying jet aeroplane

shooting star

swaying tree branches

Air is a useful material. Which THREE of these are examples of how we use air?

sails on a ship

blowing leaves off trees

tornadoes

a hot air balloon

drying washing on a clothes line outside

Air is used to give objects shape, and act a 'shock absorber' . Which THREE of these are good examples of that?

bubbles in lemonade

rubber tyres

sponge

football

bouncy castle

Which THREE of these contain trapped air which makes them soft and light?

flaky pastry

bath sponge

clay

candyfloss

glass

Air plays an important role in the water cycle. Water from seas and lakes changes into vapour by the action of wind and warmth.

 

What is the scientific name for this process?

convection

magnetism

evaporation

melting

Sam and Kelly fill a beaker to the top with dry sand.

 

Kelly says: "The spaces between the sand grains are filled by air."

Sam says:"The sand grains completely fill the beaker."

 

Who do you think is correct?

Sam

Kelly

Kelly decides to show Sam that the sand is mixed with air in the beaker.

 

What material could Kelly add to the beaker to test her idea?  Type your answer into the box.

Kelly decides to help Sam understand how the beaker contains a mixture of sand and air. She fills another beaker with a mixture of small dice and marbles.

 

What is this kind of scientific enquiry called?

observation

modelling

measuring

Sam wants to show that air is a material because it has a mass, that means that it can be weighed.

 

He hangs an identical balloon on each arm of a balance to show that they weigh the same. What must he do now to show that air can be weighed, that it has a mass?

blow up both balloons

blow up one balloon

hold the balloons in his hands to see which feels heavier

  • Question 1

What kind of material is air?

CORRECT ANSWER
gas
EDDIE SAYS
Gas - that's something that spreads out to fill the space you give it, something that is really light (as the particles it's made of are so spread out). Some gases are made of a single chemical (like oxygen). Air is a mixture of different gases.
  • Question 2

Air is a colourless gas, but we can see its effects.

 

Which THREE of these movements are caused by air particles?

CORRECT ANSWER
flapping flag
waves in the sea
swaying tree branches
EDDIE SAYS
Although an aeroplane flies through the air, it uses energy to work against the air and gravity, because it is very heavy. Shooting stars are in space. There is no air in space!
  • Question 3

Air is a useful material. Which THREE of these are examples of how we use air?

CORRECT ANSWER
sails on a ship
a hot air balloon
drying washing on a clothes line outside
EDDIE SAYS
Wind and breeze speeds up the process of evaporation -liquid changing to a gas. Clothes dry much quicker on a dry, windy day.
  • Question 4

Air is used to give objects shape, and act a 'shock absorber' . Which THREE of these are good examples of that?

CORRECT ANSWER
rubber tyres
football
bouncy castle
EDDIE SAYS
Imagine riding a bicycle with solid tyres, or kicking a solid football! Ouch!
  • Question 5

Which THREE of these contain trapped air which makes them soft and light?

CORRECT ANSWER
flaky pastry
bath sponge
candyfloss
EDDIE SAYS
LIke bread, these three contain trapped gases. Polystyrene is the same . It makes them much lighter and, in the case of pastry and bread, makes them nicer to eat.
  • Question 6

Air plays an important role in the water cycle. Water from seas and lakes changes into vapour by the action of wind and warmth.

 

What is the scientific name for this process?

CORRECT ANSWER
evaporation
EDDIE SAYS
Yes, evaporation is when a liquid changes into a gas. The one you're familiar with is water turning to steam as it's heated. Melting is when a solid is warmed and turns into a liquid - like chocolate in your hand on a hot day!
  • Question 7

Sam and Kelly fill a beaker to the top with dry sand.

 

Kelly says: "The spaces between the sand grains are filled by air."

Sam says:"The sand grains completely fill the beaker."

 

Who do you think is correct?

CORRECT ANSWER
Kelly
EDDIE SAYS
Sand grains are irregular shapes which leave gaps between them. These spaces are filled with air when the sand is dry. Soil also contains air.
  • Question 8

Kelly decides to show Sam that the sand is mixed with air in the beaker.

 

What material could Kelly add to the beaker to test her idea?  Type your answer into the box.

CORRECT ANSWER
water
liquid
EDDIE SAYS
Kelly pours water into the beaker. Even though the beaker looks 'full' she notices the bubbles of air leaving the surface of the sand as the water now fills the gaps between the grains.
  • Question 9

Kelly decides to help Sam understand how the beaker contains a mixture of sand and air. She fills another beaker with a mixture of small dice and marbles.

 

What is this kind of scientific enquiry called?

CORRECT ANSWER
modelling
EDDIE SAYS
In science using models can help us to explain what is happening when things are too small to be seen. So, by using the equivalent of big grains of sand (marbles and dice), Kelly can show Sam what's going on with the sand.
  • Question 10

Sam wants to show that air is a material because it has a mass, that means that it can be weighed.

 

He hangs an identical balloon on each arm of a balance to show that they weigh the same. What must he do now to show that air can be weighed, that it has a mass?

CORRECT ANSWER
blow up one balloon
EDDIE SAYS
The balloon filled with air weighs more than the 'empty' balloon and will pull the balance arm down.
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