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Testing Solids

In this worksheet, students will answer questions about the tests used to classify solids and use science vocabulary to describe the properties of solids.

'Testing Solids' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   States of Matter

Curriculum subtopic:   Solids, Liquids and Gases

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

 

Bricks Trainers Keys

 

Solid materials are everywhere in our environment. They have many many different properties; colourless, shiny, soft, odourless etc. But we could also describe some liquids and gases using the same vocabulary.

 

So how do scientists 'test' materials to classify them as solids?

 

Sandcastle

 

Bricks, trainers and keys are all solid, but so is sand, which appears to be very different!  Let's test it out.

Bowl of sugar

 

Ellie and Patryk are working with solids they have found at home. They put brown sugar into a bowl. They record their observations.

 

Which properties, that solids have, can they identify just by looking?

takes the shape of the container

it is brown

does not take the shape of the container

has a sweet taste

does not have a flat surface

One of the statements in Question 1 is also an observation, but Ellie and Patryk can't make this observation just by looking at the sugar.

 

Select this property of brown sugar.

has a flat surface

has a sweet taste

Patryk tips some of the sugar into a small dish. He pushes his finger into it.

 

He predicts that it will not flow back.

 

Is Patryk's prediction correct?

yes

no

Ellie and Patryk need help to find TWO more properties of solids from this list.

 

Can you help them?

solids have definite volumes

solids expand to fill the container

solids have definite shapes

solids can flow

Ellie says: "I know that solids cannot easily be compressed (squashed into a smaller volume)."

 

Patryk says: "Sponge can be compressed, and that's a solid."

 

What do you think?

Ellie is correct

Patryk is correct

Which material is in the dry sponge which made Patryk think that it could be compressed?

bubble bath

water

air

Hour glass

 

Is the following statement true or false?

 

Solids made up of very small particles, crystals or grains, can be poured like liquids.

true

false

Ellie and Patryk have learnt that solids have a definite volume and shape.

 

Choose TWO of these statements about the particles in solids to explain why.

they are hard

they are packed closely together

there are strong forces of attraction between them

they are held loosely together

people make the shape

  • Question 1

Bowl of sugar

 

Ellie and Patryk are working with solids they have found at home. They put brown sugar into a bowl. They record their observations.

 

Which properties, that solids have, can they identify just by looking?

CORRECT ANSWER
does not take the shape of the container
does not have a flat surface
EDDIE SAYS
Liquids take the shape of the container, solids don't. Then again, when a liquid is in a glass, it has a flat surface - solids can be any shape.
  • Question 2

One of the statements in Question 1 is also an observation, but Ellie and Patryk can't make this observation just by looking at the sugar.

 

Select this property of brown sugar.

CORRECT ANSWER
has a sweet taste
EDDIE SAYS
As scientists, we use our senses to gather information and when we do this, it's called an OBSERVATION. The sweet taste is an observation.
BEWARE: scientists NEVER touch, smell or taste materials which are not clearly and correctly labelled. (It could be very dangerous).
  • Question 3

Patryk tips some of the sugar into a small dish. He pushes his finger into it.

 

He predicts that it will not flow back.

 

Is Patryk's prediction correct?

CORRECT ANSWER
yes
EDDIE SAYS
Unlike liquids, solids do not flow back when a force is applied to them.
  • Question 4

Ellie and Patryk need help to find TWO more properties of solids from this list.

 

Can you help them?

CORRECT ANSWER
solids have definite volumes
solids have definite shapes
EDDIE SAYS
Remember that each small crystal or grain of materials like salt, sugar or sand is a solid piece.
  • Question 5

Ellie says: "I know that solids cannot easily be compressed (squashed into a smaller volume)."

 

Patryk says: "Sponge can be compressed, and that's a solid."

 

What do you think?

CORRECT ANSWER
Ellie is correct
EDDIE SAYS
Gases are easily compressed because their particles have big spaces betweeen them. The particles in solids are packed very closely together, making them difficult to compress.
  • Question 6

Which material is in the dry sponge which made Patryk think that it could be compressed?

CORRECT ANSWER
air
EDDIE SAYS
The holes in the dry sponge are full of a gas - air! Can you think of some other examples?
  • Question 7

Hour glass

 

Is the following statement true or false?

 

Solids made up of very small particles, crystals or grains, can be poured like liquids.

CORRECT ANSWER
true
EDDIE SAYS
Because sand grains or salt crystals are small, they can be poured. But remember, each crystal or grain is solid material which, on its own, would not pour or flow!
  • Question 8

Ellie and Patryk have learnt that solids have a definite volume and shape.

 

Choose TWO of these statements about the particles in solids to explain why.

CORRECT ANSWER
they are packed closely together
there are strong forces of attraction between them
EDDIE SAYS
Particles in all solids are held closly together by strong forces of attraction. That's why solids behave as they do - they have a definite shape and volume as the particles are all held in place and cannot move around.
---- OR ----

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