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Find the Related Homonym

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches both of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Find the Related Homonym' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word stalk in the two sentences below?

The lion needed to stalk its prey.

The leaves were attached to the stalk.

 

That’s right. The word stalk means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: stalk could mean to follow or be part of a plant.

       

    

 

Below are two groups of words which may appear to be unrelated. You need to find one word which fits equally well with both groups (so it needs to be a homonym). 

(Holiday, Outing)   (Fall, Stumble) 

 

Which word from the list below fits with both groups?

a) Break

b) Trip

c) Excursion

d) Vacation

 

The answer is 'trip' because it fits with both of the word groups and their associated meanings!

 

      

 

Let’s try another: 

(Healthy, Fit)   (Skilfully, Correctly) 

 

Which word fits with both these groups of words? 

a) Well

b) Nicely

c) Impressively

d) Satisfactorily

 

The answer is 'well' as it is a synonym of healthy and is also a word for doing things skilfully or correctly.

 

                          

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

Hello word detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Beat, Throb)

(Bean, Lentil) 

 

Beat

Rate

Heart

Pulse

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'shade' mean?

 

Underneath the large tree, the grass was a different shade of green.

 

The grass is a different colour

It's cooler under the tree

There are shadows under the tree

People like to sit there on hot days

Select the two definitions of the word 'address' from the options below.

The grass is a different colour

It's cooler under the tree

There are shadows under the tree

People like to sit there on hot days

How's it going so far, word detective?

 

Type the word below which fits with both of the following definitions.

The man who marries the bride at a wedding.

The act of brushing an animal like a horse.

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Weak, Wilting)

(Stagger, Hobble)

Slack

Hop

Limp

Stumble

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type in brackets to guide you.

Column A

Column B

Tower (noun)
To calculate the number of something
Tower (verb)
A tall building
Count (verb)
To be high above something else
Count (noun)
A nobleman

You're beyond halfway through this activity now, keep pushing!

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'foil' from the options below.

(You'll find nouns on one side and verbs on the other.)

 

Column A

Column B

Tower (noun)
To calculate the number of something
Tower (verb)
A tall building
Count (verb)
To be high above something else
Count (noun)
A nobleman

Select the most likely definition of the homonym 'line' as it relates to each sentence.

 

 

Choose from the definitions below: 

a) Cover the inside of something

b) A queue

c) A string of words

d) A mark on a page

 Cover the inside of somethingA queueA string of wordsA mark on a page
Put a line through the correct answer.
She lined the cake tin with grease proof paper.
We worked hard to learn our lines.
Get into an orderly line please.

mint is a type of sweet that people often suck to freshen their breath.

 

Select the other two definitions for the word mint from the list below.

 

A flavoursome plant

A poisonous plant

Where coins are spent

Where coins are made

Where coins are valued

And you're onto the last question...

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Blush, Redden)

(Rinse, Clean) 

Swish

Swill

Colour

Flush

  • Question 1

Hello word detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Beat, Throb)

(Bean, Lentil) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Pulse
EDDIE SAYS
The picture shows someone checking their pulse, but do you know what that actually is? It's the beat of your heart which can be felt in several parts of your body but most easily, in your wrist. It can refer to other beats as well, such as music. If you haven't heard 'pulse' used for food before, look it up to find which foods are types of pulses. They're a nutritious food group because pulses are a good source of both protein and fibre and help to make our bodies healthy.
  • Question 2

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'shade' mean?

 

Underneath the large tree, the grass was a different shade of green.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The grass is a different colour
EDDIE SAYS
Be careful here. We're not talking about the shade as in the shadow the tree is making, because the word 'shade' has been linked to the grass. Understanding this connection should help see the sentence is talking about the colour of the grass. Maybe the grass is greener under the tree because it's not been scorched by the sun.
  • Question 3

Select the two definitions of the word 'address' from the options below.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
I hope you know your address. It's important if you ever get lost. You probably think of it as where you live, but other places have addresses too, even if people don't live there. Think of places like the supermarket, the cinema and the swimming pool. These all have addresses in order for people to find the position of these buildings on a road. The verb address is quite a formal way of speaking, but it means to talk to someone. For example, you could use the sentence, 'The headmaster addressed the children in assembly'.
  • Question 4

How's it going so far, word detective?

 

Type the word below which fits with both of the following definitions.

The man who marries the bride at a wedding.

The act of brushing an animal like a horse.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Groom
EDDIE SAYS
The man at a wedding is actually called the bridegroom, but this is often shortened to groom. This is an example of a noun, while the verb is the act of brushing an animal. Have you ever been to or seen a grooming parlour where people might take their dogs to be tidied up?
  • Question 5

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Weak, Wilting)

(Stagger, Hobble)

CORRECT ANSWER
Limp
EDDIE SAYS
If you've ever hurt your ankle or foot, you will have been limping. Limp can also be an adjective. For example, when you get pins and needles in your arm and it goes floppy, we say that it's limp. This means that it's weak. If you forget to water a plant that lives in your house, the leaves will go limp which is a sure sign that you need to give it some attention!
  • Question 6

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type in brackets to guide you.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Tower (noun)
A tall building
Tower (verb)
To be high above something else
Count (verb)
To calculate the number of someth...
Count (noun)
A nobleman
EDDIE SAYS
If you've ever been to a city, you will have seen tower blocks. These are tall buildings full of flats or offices. If you have been to a church, you might have seen a clock tower, which is the tall part which reaches above the rest. We can also use the verb to show what these do in relation to others. You can say the buildings towered over us. As for count, the verb is commonly used, while the noun is more of an old-fashioned term, and is the name for an important man, similar to a lord or duke.
  • Question 7

You're beyond halfway through this activity now, keep pushing!

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'foil' from the options below.

(You'll find nouns on one side and verbs on the other.)

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
You probably recognise tin foil as the thin metal that you can wrap food in to keep it fresh. The verb is a bit trickier here! You are most likely to have heard it in the context of 'foiling a plan' if a plan is foiled, it is prevented from happening.
  • Question 8

Select the most likely definition of the homonym 'line' as it relates to each sentence.

 

 

Choose from the definitions below: 

a) Cover the inside of something

b) A queue

c) A string of words

d) A mark on a page

CORRECT ANSWER
 Cover the inside of somethingA queueA string of wordsA mark on a page
Put a line through the correct answer.
She lined the cake tin with grease proof paper.
We worked hard to learn our lines.
Get into an orderly line please.
EDDIE SAYS
Wow! Line has a lot of definitions, doesn't it? I'm sure you could even find more. It's useful to spot whether it's being used as a noun or a verb. All but the second option here are nouns. You need to take your time with the context to identify the correct definition as it relates to each sentence. It would be strange to put a line through the correct answer if you were talking about a line of people, wouldn't it? Use your common sense to help you out.
  • Question 9

mint is a type of sweet that people often suck to freshen their breath.

 

Select the other two definitions for the word mint from the list below.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
A flavoursome plant
Where coins are made
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever tasted the plant mint? It has a really strong flavour, just like the refreshing sweets that lots of us enjoy. The second definition might be a new one, so make a note of it if you've not heard of the mint where a country's coins are made. Look it up if you are curious to know more!
  • Question 10

And you're onto the last question...

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Blush, Redden)

(Rinse, Clean) 

CORRECT ANSWER
Flush
EDDIE SAYS
We're probably all thinking the same in that we most often hear this word in terms of flushing the toilet! You can flush other things away though if you rinse them with a fast flow of water. Flush also means the same as blush. Has anyone ever told you that you look flushed when you have had a red face? Fantastic work, homonym hunter! In this activity, you developed your ability to identify the related homonym. Why not attempt another so that you feel super confident?
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