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Recognise which Homonyms Fit

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches both of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Recognise which Homonyms Fit' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word stalk in the two sentences below?

 

The lion needed to stalk its prey.

The leaves were attached to the stalk.

 

That’s right, the word stalk means something completely different in each sentence.

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: stalk could mean to follow or could refer to part of a plant.

 

 

 

       


 

Below are two groups of words which may appear to be unrelated. You need to find one word which fits equally well with both groups (so it needs to be a homonym). 

 

(Fall, Stumble)   (Holiday, Outing) 

 

Which word from the list below fits with both groups?

a) vacation

b) break

c) trip

d) excursion

 

The answer is trip because it fits with both of the word groups and their associated meanings!

 

 

            

 

 

Let’s try another: 

(Healthy, Fit)    (Skilfully, Correctly) 

 

Which word fits with both these groups of words? 

a) well

b) satisfactory

c) impressive

d) nice

 

The answer is well as its a synonym of healthy and is also another word for doing something skilfully or correctly.

 

                 


 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

 

Are you ready to begin?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Vegetable, Plant)

(Grow, Bud) 

 

 

     

Broccoli

Sprout

Carrot

Beanstalk

In this sentence, what does the homonym hatch mean?

 

The chicken cautiously peeped through the hatch and pecked for corn. 

 

 

 

The chicken has just come out of its egg

The chicken is looking through a door in its coop

Someone has cracked the egg and scared the chicken

The chicken is walking down the ramp of the coop

Select the two definitions of the word let from the options below.

 

Choose one from each list. 

 

 

 

 

The chicken has just come out of its egg

The chicken is looking through a door in its coop

Someone has cracked the egg and scared the chicken

The chicken is walking down the ramp of the coop

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A fried potato.

A crack, in the side of a mug for example.

 

 

Are you getting the hang of these yet, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Plaster, Mould)

(Characters, Parts) 

 

 

     

Actors

Bandage

Break

Cast

In this sentence, what does the homonym dice mean?

 

 He went into the kitchen to dice the meat for dinner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chop into cubes

Cut into thin strips

Warm gently in a pan

Bake in the oven

Select the two definitions of the word examine from the options below.

 

Choose one from each list. 

 

 

 

 

Chop into cubes

Cut into thin strips

Warm gently in a pan

Bake in the oven

Select the most likely definition of the homonym mind next to each sentence.

 

Choose from the definitions below.

 

Thoughts

Look after

 

 

    

 ThoughtsLook after
They could tell there was something on their teacher's mind.
The teacher was careful to mind the children as they crossed the road.
The girl was proud to be allowed to mind her baby sister.
The baby certainly had a mind of her own and wouldn't keep still.

model is someone who wears new fashions and trends.

 

Select the other definition for the word model from the list below. 

 

 

The runway that models walk down

Something that is not real

An often smaller copy of an object

To draw a copy of something

Yippee - you've reached the final question, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Tree, Cone)

(Want, Long for) 

 

 

     

Need

Pine

Branch

Trunk

  • Question 1

Are you ready to begin?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Vegetable, Plant)

(Grow, Bud) 

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Sprout
EDDIE SAYS
Do you like sprouts? They're not the most popular vegetable but they are often part of a winter roast dinner. Sprout is also a verb used to describe when a plant germinates and begins to grow. If that's a new word for you, why not make a note of it in a list of new vocabulary - you never know when such a list might come in useful.
  • Question 2

In this sentence, what does the homonym hatch mean?

 

The chicken cautiously peeped through the hatch and pecked for corn. 

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
The chicken is looking through a door in its coop
EDDIE SAYS
Did you know that a hatch is a type of door? In this question, the mention of the chicken tries to trick you and make you think of the verb to hatch, which refers to a chick hatching out of an egg. Hatches don't have to be related to doors in chicken houses - there are all sorts of hatches. Maybe if you have school dinners, your lunch is served through a hatch in the canteen. How many types of hatch can you think of?
  • Question 3

Select the two definitions of the word let from the options below.

 

Choose one from each list. 

 

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Can you think of some of the things you're allowed to do, or permitted to do, at home? These are things that the adults in your family 'let' you do. The other definition of let is to rent. Look out for signs outside houses that say 'To Let', this means the space is available to rent.
  • Question 4

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A fried potato.

A crack, in the side of a mug for example.

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Chip
EDDIE SAYS
Have you read or seen 'Beauty and the Beast'? There's a mug called Chip, who has a tiny crack, like in the picture. It's not the same as saying a mug, plate or glass is completely smashed, but refers to when there's just a small part chipped away. The other definition which shares this spelling is, of course, the popular food, chips!
  • Question 5

Are you getting the hang of these yet, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Plaster, Mould)

(Characters, Parts) 

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Cast
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever had a part of your body in a cast? If so, you probably broke a bone or damaged a muscle or ligament really badly. The other definition refers to the cast of a TV show or a play. These are the people who star in the show.
  • Question 6

In this sentence, what does the homonym dice mean?

 

 He went into the kitchen to dice the meat for dinner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Chop into cubes
EDDIE SAYS
If you think of dice that you use in a board game, what shape are they? The fact they are cubes is a good hint here! If you dice meat or vegetables, it means you chop them into cubes. You will often find the instruction to dice food when you are following a recipe.
  • Question 7

Select the two definitions of the word examine from the options below.

 

Choose one from each list. 

 

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
The little girl in the picture is examining the tree very carefully! This means that you look at, or inspect something really carefully. That's why it's called an examination if you go to the doctor or optician for example. The other definition is what you are working towards through these practice questions! To examine someone is to test them, so you are preparing for your 11 plus examination. How do you think it's going so far?
  • Question 8

Select the most likely definition of the homonym mind next to each sentence.

 

Choose from the definitions below.

 

Thoughts

Look after

 

 

    

CORRECT ANSWER
 ThoughtsLook after
They could tell there was something on their teacher's mind.
The teacher was careful to mind the children as they crossed the road.
The girl was proud to be allowed to mind her baby sister.
The baby certainly had a mind of her own and wouldn't keep still.
EDDIE SAYS
You are probably aware of your mind as being your thoughts and feelings. What about the verb 'to mind' though? If you have a childminder, you might suddenly spot where this word comes from as they are people who look after children!
  • Question 9

model is someone who wears new fashions and trends.

 

Select the other definition for the word model from the list below. 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
An often smaller copy of an object
EDDIE SAYS
Do you have any models? These might be of cars, trains, people, buildings, anything in fact! These are usually smaller than the real thing, for example, a model train set would certainly not fit in your house if it was as big as a real train. However, you can sometimes get life-size models of things.
  • Question 10

Yippee - you've reached the final question, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Tree, Cone)

(Want, Long for) 

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Pine
EDDIE SAYS
When a person, or even an animal, pines for something, it means they really want something. It tends to be a really intense desire, often for something they used to have. The other definition matches with the pine cone in the picture, which comes from the evergreen pine tree. Well, what did you think of this activity then? Hopefully, you are feeling more confident about words with similar meanings now!
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