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Demonstrate Understanding of Homonym Meanings

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches both of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Demonstrate Understanding of Homonym Meanings' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word bat in the two sentences below?

 

The bat flew through the window.

He hit the ball with a bat.

 

That’s right! The word bat means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: bat could mean a flying animal or, an item used to hit a ball.

 

       

 

Below are two pairs of words which may appear to be unrelated. It is your job to find one word which fits equally well with both groups (so it needs to be a homonym). 

 

(Sport, Event) (Fire, Light) 

 

Which word from the list below fits with both groups?

a) Candle

b) Team

c) Play

d) Match

The answer is match because it fits with both of the word groups and their associated meanings!

 

 
 

Let’s try another pair: 

(Leap, Metal coil) 

 

Which word fits with both these groups of words? 

a) Jump

b) Spring

c) Pounce

d) Screw

 

The answer is spring as it's a synonym of leap and is also the name for a metal coil.

 

 

 

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Psst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

Are you ready to begin, word detective?

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'air' is used as a verb.

Her dress was light and airy

It's important to breathe clean air

It was important for her to air her opinion

There was a feeling of tension in the air

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Illuminated, Fluorescent)

(Sharp, Intelligent) 

 

Light

Clever

Glowing

Bright

How are you getting on with these questions, word detective?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'bar' mean?

Due to their behaviour, the owner had to bar them from the restaurant.

 

He gave them a drink

He banned them

He invited them in

He asked them to buy a drink

Select the two definitions of the word content from the options below.

Choose one from each list. 

 

He gave them a drink

He banned them

He invited them in

He asked them to buy a drink

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Cry, Duct)

(Split, Slit) 

Weep

Bawl

Tear

Rip

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'lap' is used as a noun.

He is running so fast that he is about to lap the other runners

My cat will lap water straight from the tap!

I love cuddling the baby on my lap

The gentle waves were lapping at my feet

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

(Use the word type provided in brackets to help you.)

Column A

Column B

Hit (noun)
Success
Hit (verb)
Imply
Mean (adjective)
Cruel
Mean (noun)
Average
Mean (verb)
Strike

You're nearly there, word detective - keep going!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

(Feel, Want)

(Slope, Upwards) 

 

Arrow pointing upwards

Incline

Decline

Arose

Trajectory

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A circular ring.

A group of people, possibly musicians.

 

A bundle of hairbands

Well done for reaching the final question, homonym hunter.

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'lead' from the options below.

One side is nouns and the other is verbs.

 

  • Question 1

Are you ready to begin, word detective?

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'air' is used as a verb.

CORRECT ANSWER
It was important for her to air her opinion
EDDIE SAYS
I'm sure you're aware of the air that we breathe, but what about when air is used as a verb? It can mean different things, but here it means to express how she feels. If it had been used as a verb as in airing clothes, it is a way of saying that clothes are being dried out.
  • Question 2

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Illuminated, Fluorescent)

(Sharp, Intelligent) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Bright
EDDIE SAYS
The answer here is quite a simple word, but if any of the words in the brackets are new to you, make sure you look them up, particularly the two words which mean 'lit up'! Remember that it is really important to keep a note of new words as this is the best way to expand your vocabulary.
  • Question 3

How are you getting on with these questions, word detective?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'bar' mean?

Due to their behaviour, the owner had to bar them from the restaurant.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
He banned them
EDDIE SAYS
The first thing that might have popped into your head here is the bar where people buy alcoholic drinks. However, the restaurant owner doesn't want to give these people drinks. They have done something to upset the owner, so they have been banned! Barred and banned mean the same.
  • Question 4

Select the two definitions of the word content from the options below.

Choose one from each list. 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
If you are feeling content, you are happy! This is not in a way that you would be jumping for joy but means that you feel quietly satisfied with how things are. Be careful of the second definition, as these words all relate to how you might think of the contents of a book for example. The actual content of a book though is what it is made up of, which is its subject matter.
  • Question 5

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Cry, Duct)

(Split, Slit) 

CORRECT ANSWER
Tear
EDDIE SAYS
The spelling might be the same, but we have slightly different pronunciations here. The tear that you cry rhymes with 'dear', while a tear, or rip, in a piece of clothing, is pronounced so that it rhymes with 'bear'. Did you wonder about the word 'duct' in the first bracket? Tears are produced in tear ducts which then release the tears into our eyes.
  • Question 6

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'lap' is used as a noun.

CORRECT ANSWER
I love cuddling the baby on my lap
EDDIE SAYS
Did you see just how many different ways there are of using the word 'lap' here? It was easy to spot that Option 1 was a verb because it had the word 'to' before the word 'lap' - it means to run right around a circuit so that you actually go past the other runners on their previous circuit. Options 2 and 4 also used the word as a verb to mean either the way an animal drinks or the gentle motion of water. This leaves Option 3 for our noun - a clue would have been that the word before it is a pronoun, 'my', which then needs to be followed by a noun.
  • Question 7

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

(Use the word type provided in brackets to help you.)

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Hit (noun)
Success
Hit (verb)
Strike
Mean (adjective)
Cruel
Mean (noun)
Average
Mean (verb)
Imply
EDDIE SAYS
Have you heard of a song or a film being a real hit? This means it's a great success! Obviously this is very different from the verb. 'Mean' might have proved to be the slightly trickier one here! The adjective is the simplest definition. As a verb, we are very used to being asked 'What do you mean?' but if you do not recognise the word 'imply' as being what you mean, make a quick note of it. The final definition is actually a term used in maths. Have you had to find the mean, or average, in your maths lessons? Check up on that if you're unsure!
  • Question 8

You're nearly there, word detective - keep going!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

(Feel, Want)

(Slope, Upwards) 

 

Arrow pointing upwards

CORRECT ANSWER
Incline
EDDIE SAYS
Goodness, these are tricky! How did you get on? It's easier to use the verb form of 'incline' in the past tense. For example, 'He was inclined to believe he was right.' Does this help you to recognise its definition? It means that he feels that his opinion is the right one. The noun incline is a slope and is used more often to mean going upwards, with 'decline' usually used to mean going downwards. So, some tricky words here - why not make a note of the ones that are new to you?
  • Question 9

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A circular ring.

A group of people, possibly musicians.

 

A bundle of hairbands

CORRECT ANSWER
Band
EDDIE SAYS
A band is like a ring but can come in forms other than just jewellery. The picture shows hair bands and you can also get elastic bands. Can you think of any others? As for the group of people, you'll be most familiar with music bands.
  • Question 10

Well done for reaching the final question, homonym hunter.

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'lead' from the options below.

One side is nouns and the other is verbs.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
There are many definitions of 'lead', and it varies as to whether the pronunciation rhymes with 'head' or 'reed'. In this question, both pronunciations rhyme with 'reed'. If the computer that you're currently using is plugged in, you'll be able to see the lead, or cable, going to the plug. As for the verb, leading suggests you are in front and others are following you, so this works well with the definition 'Guide'. How did you feel about this activity? I wouldn't be surprised to hear that you found it quite challenging - there were some tricky words in here. The best habit to form is keeping note of those new words and to keep on practising these activities - it will become easier if you do. Your EdPlace team hope this activity helped you expand your knowledge of more sophisticated homonyms.
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