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Recognise Which Homonyms Relate

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches both of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Recognise Which Homonyms Relate' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word stalk in the two sentences below?

 

The lion needed to stalk its prey.

The leaves were attached to the stalk.

 

That’s right! The word stalk means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: stalk could mean to follow or be part of a plant.

 

 

 

Below are two groups of words which may appear to be unrelated. You need to find one word which fits equally well with both groups (so it needs to be a homonym). 

 

(Fall, Stumble) (Holiday, Outing) 

 

Which word from the list below fits with both groups?

a) Vacation

b) Break

c) Trip

d) Excursion

 

The answer is trip because it fits with both of the word groups and their associated meanings!

 

 

 

 

Let’s try another: 

(Healthy, Fit) (Skilfully, Correctly) 

 

Which word fits with both these groups of words? 

a) Well

b) Satisfactory

c) Impressive

d) Nice

 

The answer is well as it is a synonym of healthy and is also another word for doing something skilfully or correctly.

               


 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Psst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

Are you ready to begin, word detective?

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'buckle' is used as a verb.

 

He tightened the buckle on his belt

Buckle your shoes up tightly

She needed an extra hole on the buckle of her shoes

The bag had a buckle on the front

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Roller, Wheels)

(Athlete, Sprinter) 

 

A sprinter, crouched ready to run

Racer

Fitness

Trolley

Runner

How are you getting on with these questions, word detective?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'upset' mean?

 

The less talented team knocked the champions out in a huge cup upset.

Everybody except for the champions were pleased

The champions felt really disappointed

It was an unexpected event

Some people had guessed this could happen

Select the two definitions of the word 'object' from the options below.

 

Everybody except for the champions were pleased

The champions felt really disappointed

It was an unexpected event

Some people had guessed this could happen

You're already at the halfway point world detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below.

 

(Fine, Fee) (Approach, Stampede)

 

Man grabbing his money

Prize

Charge

Attack

Bill

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'perfect' is used as a verb.

She tried hard to perfect her work

"Nobody is completely perfect, you know."

"You achieved a perfect score in your test"

"Your behaviour is perfect"

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type in brackets to guide you.

 

Young man flexing his biceps

Column A

Column B

Might (noun)
Strength
Might (verb)
Praise
Mighty (adjective)
Strong
Hail (noun)
May
Hail (verb)
Frozen rain

You're nearly there, word detective - keep going!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Laze, Relax) (Room, Reception) 

 

Settee

Sanctuary

Recline

Lounge

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A pencil lead that needs sharpening.

To be straight to the point, and possibly a little rude.

 

 

 

Well done for reaching the final question, homonym hunter.

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'rash' from the options below.

(One side is nouns and the other is adjectives.)

 

  • Question 1

Are you ready to begin, word detective?

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'buckle' is used as a verb.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Buckle your shoes up tightly
EDDIE SAYS
The noun and verb are really closely related here. The clips you do up on shoes, bags and belts are called buckles, but the act of actually doing them up is the verb as in to buckle them up! This means the sentence with the instruction to buckle up the shoes is the option with a verb.
  • Question 2

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Roller, Wheels)

(Athlete, Sprinter) 

 

A sprinter, crouched ready to run

CORRECT ANSWER
Runner
EDDIE SAYS
You probably have heard of the competitors in a running race being referred to as runners, but what about the other definition? An example you might be able to find at home is the runners in a chest of drawers. If you pull out a drawer and can see a little wheel, this is what allows the draw to run backwards or forwards when you pull or push it. So runners are small wheels which allow something to move.
  • Question 3

How are you getting on with these questions, word detective?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'upset' mean?

 

The less talented team knocked the champions out in a huge cup upset.

CORRECT ANSWER
It was an unexpected event
EDDIE SAYS
In sport, or in any competitive events in life, there is normally a team, side, or person who is expected to win. If they don't, this is called an upset, not because everyone is really sad but because it is unexpected. Look out for this next time you're watching a sporting event.
  • Question 4

Select the two definitions of the word 'object' from the options below.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Look at all of the objects in the room around you now. There are lots of different items, or things, I'm sure! The other definition of 'object' is pronounced with slightly more emphasis on '-ject.' Ask an adult if you're unsure! This is when you say no to something, and disagree with it. So, if someone makes a decision that you think is wrong, you object to it. You sometimes hear people in a courtroom shout, "Objection!" so now you know what that means.
  • Question 5

You're already at the halfway point world detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below.

 

(Fine, Fee) (Approach, Stampede)

 

Man grabbing his money

CORRECT ANSWER
Charge
EDDIE SAYS
If someone shouted, "charge!" what do you expect to happen? Do you imagine a group of people or animals racing in the same direction? That's what a stampede is if that's a new word for you. The other type of charge refers to money. If someone is charged for something, they are expected to pay money, usually because they've done something wrong.
  • Question 6

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'perfect' is used as a verb.

CORRECT ANSWER
She tried hard to perfect her work
EDDIE SAYS
The verb and adjective forms of 'perfect' are closely related in meaning. The adjective tells you something is perfect, describing it as being faultless, while the verb is the act of trying to making something perfect. So in the first sentence, the girl is trying hard to make her work as good as possible, which means she is perfecting it. You're working hard to perfect your scores in your 11 plus practice, but there's a lot of truth in the second statement, nobody is completely perfect, so don't be put off by the odd mistake here and there!
  • Question 7

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type in brackets to guide you.

 

Young man flexing his biceps

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Might (noun)
Strength
Might (verb)
May
Mighty (adjective)
Strong
Hail (noun)
Frozen rain
Hail (verb)
Praise
EDDIE SAYS
Someone's might is their strength. Mighty is an option to check that you can spot the difference between a noun and adjective. 'Strong' is an adjective because you would say, for example, she is a strong woman, whereas 'might' is a noun because you would say she has impressive strength. There's only a small difference, but it's an important one to grasp. The verb form of might is what we call a modal verb, and it shows how likely you are to do something. Might, or may, shows some possibility that you will do something, but equally, expresses the possibility that you won't! As for hail, it is a type of weather in its noun form, but another word for praise as a verb. For example, someone might shout, '"All hail the king!" which means everyone should praise the king.
  • Question 8

You're nearly there, word detective - keep going!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Laze, Relax) (Room, Reception) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Lounge
EDDIE SAYS
Think about what the lounge is for in your house. It's a room where you relax and sit or lie around in because you're allowed to be a bit lazy in there! You can now see how the name for the room links to the meaning of the verb to lounge. Some people call the lounge the sitting room or the front room. It can also be called a reception room, as it is a place where you greet your friends and invite them in.
  • Question 9

Type the word below which fits with both of these definitions.

 

A pencil lead that needs sharpening.

To be straight to the point, and possibly a little rude.

 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Blunt
EDDIE SAYS
You're probably familiar with a blunt pencil, which needs sharpening. The other meaning of 'blunt' refers to speaking to someone in an abrupt way. You say exactly what you think but in a short and slightly rude way. Ask someone to give you an example of speaking bluntly if you're unsure.
  • Question 10

Well done for reaching the final question, homonym hunter.

 

Select the two definitions of the word 'rash' from the options below.

(One side is nouns and the other is adjectives.)

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever had a rash? It may well have been itchy, and even bumpy, but these words describe it rather than defining what a rash actually is. It is a collection of spots. The adjective could describe a decision. For example, if you made a rash decision, it's something that you haven't thought through or planned. Rash decisions can often be bad decisions, as you've not thought through the consequences! Hopefully, you made no rash decisions in answering your questions today! Working through these activities will have meant that you developed your skill to recognise homonyms that relate to a given set of words. Why not attempt another, more challenging activity to push yourself further?
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