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Identify the Homonyms that Fit in Two Sentences

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches all of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Identify the Homonyms that Fit in Two Sentences' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word rash in the two sentences below?

 

The rash on her arm was really itchy.

There was no doubt she had made a foolish and rash decision.

 

You’ve got it. The word rash means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: rash could mean marks and spots on your skin or, it could mean a thoughtless decision or action.

 

  

 

We need to find a word that fits with the words in the left and right sets of brackets. This word will be a homonym.

 

(Gift, Treat) (Now, Current)

 

Our choices are: 

a) Soon

b) Today

c) Ready

d) Instant

e) Present

 

The answer is present because it fits with both the word groups and their associated meanings. Present can mean a gift, as well as referring to the current time.


Two children opening Christmas presents on the sofa        

 

Let’s attempt another question:

Which word matches both sets of meanings in the brackets?

(Moult, Cast off) (Outbuilding, Hut) 

 

Our choices are: 

a) Remove

b) Shed

c) Stable

d) Barn

e) Drop

 

The correct answer is shed as this means to lose hair or skin and, can also be a small structure in the garden.

 

        

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'trace' is not used as a verb.

 

Painting with easel

Trace the outline carefully.

He disappeared without a trace.

We need to trace their whereabouts.

When you draw, trace lightly first.

It was impossible to trace where they had gone.

Hello word detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Sudden, Hasty) (Marks, Spots)

 

 

     

Rash

Patch

Dots

Sting

Blemish

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Educate, Learn) (Fish, Shoal) 

 

Student

Learn

Swarm

School

Class

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Cover, Coat) (Dish, Crockery)     

Bowl

Fork

Spoon

Cup

Plate

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Insignificant, Unimportant) (Note, Key) 

 

Minor

Major

Useless

Irrelevant

Trivial

Great stuff, word detective - you're over halfway through this activity already!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Range, Intervals) (Skin, Plate) 

 

     

Fin

Scale

Measure

Ruler

Gills

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Condition, Shape) (Declare, Express) 

 

 

     

State

Inquire

Voice

Assert

Pronounce

What type of word is hail in the sentence below?

 

All hail the new king!

 

     

Adverb

Adjective

Verb

Noun

Preposition

Nearly there - don't give up now!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Unusual, Few) (Uncooked, Raw)

     

Unique

Privilege

Scarce

Rare

Unfamiliar

Welcome to the final question!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym press is not used as a verb.

 

 

     

Press the doorbell to gain access.

They had to press the keys on the keyboard very hard.

The star didn't want to talk to the press.

The reporters knew just how to press his buttons.

Don't press the subject if they don't want to talk about it.

  • Question 1

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'trace' is not used as a verb.

 

Painting with easel

CORRECT ANSWER
He disappeared without a trace.
EDDIE SAYS
Trace has a few meanings. You might have traced around the edge of something when drawing, or used tracing paper to create a copy of a picture. It can also mean to 'find something', for example, Option 3 and 5 above. So what about the option where 'trace' is a noun? To say someone disappears without a trace means they disappear without leaving a mark or any evidence of where they've gone. A good clue to which one was the noun was that in Option 2, the word trace had an article (a) immediately before it. Did you spot that, word detective?
  • Question 2

Hello word detective!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Sudden, Hasty) (Marks, Spots)

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Rash
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever had a rash? They can be really itchy or sore. Rash, when it's used as an adjective, means thoughtless and impulsive. Some people make rash decisions and these often aren't their best decisions!
  • Question 3

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Educate, Learn) (Fish, Shoal) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
School
EDDIE SAYS
You may have made the link to school as 'educate' is another word for learn. How are you with collective nouns? You might need some specialised fish knowledge to know that a group of fish is called a school! Make a note is this is a new word for you.
  • Question 4

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Cover, Coat) (Dish, Crockery)     

CORRECT ANSWER
Plate
EDDIE SAYS
You are probably familiar with the object a plate but did you know it is a verb too? It describes the act of coating or covering something in metal. You might have heard of metal-plated armour for example.
  • Question 5

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Insignificant, Unimportant) (Note, Key) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Minor
EDDIE SAYS
If you're a musician, you might have heard of minor and major keys or notes. The word minor also means something unimportant. For example, if you have a minor problem. You might have visited the minor injuries unit if you have ever hurt yourself. This doesn't mean your injury is unimportant, but just that it is less serious than some others.
  • Question 6

Great stuff, word detective - you're over halfway through this activity already!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Range, Intervals) (Skin, Plate) 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Scale
EDDIE SAYS
Another fish-related question here! You may well have known that the sections of skin-like particles on fish are called their scales but did you know that they are also sometimes known as plates? Scale is also used to talk about the size of something. For example, a modest yet successful athlete could be said to not realise the scale of his success. You might also know the word scale from measuring items with rulers or weighing scales. They are the intervals between which, the numbers are set out.
  • Question 7

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Condition, Shape) (Declare, Express) 

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
State
EDDIE SAYS
Have you ever described something as being in a good or a bad state? Or perhaps described an upset person as being 'in a state'? This is the condition that they're in. As a verb, 'state' is a way of expressing when someone has said something, usually in a confident way, "He must state his intentions clearly".
  • Question 8

What type of word is hail in the sentence below?

 

All hail the new king!

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Verb
EDDIE SAYS
You might be familiar with the weather hail, but what about its use in this sentence? It means to call out or salute. Here it suits salute more, but if you hear of someone hailing a taxi, that works better with the definition to call out.
  • Question 9

Nearly there - don't give up now!

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Unusual, Few) (Uncooked, Raw)

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Rare
EDDIE SAYS
You may have heard of rare animals or certain situations being rare. For example, it is very rare to see a badger, or it is very rare to get snow in July! Its other definition is to do with how something is cooked. Have you ever eaten steak? Some people like it well-cooked, while others prefer it rare, which means barely cooked.
  • Question 10

Welcome to the final question!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym press is not used as a verb.

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
The star didn't want to talk to the press.
EDDIE SAYS
You can probably recognise the verb press in pressing the doorbell or pressing keys. The 4th option here is not literal - the reporters aren't pressing any actual buttons. In this case, it means to annoy someone. Have you heard this saying before? The final option uses 'press' to mean not going over and over the same point if someone doesn't want to discuss it. So what does our noun mean in Option 3? The press is another word for journalists and reporters. Well done for completing another tricky activity, homonym hunter! You have developed your skill to recognise homonyms as either nouns or verbs, within given sentences.
---- OR ----

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