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Discover the Homonyms that Fit in Two Sentences

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches all of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Discover the Homonyms that Fit in Two Sentences' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word rash in the two sentences below?

 

The rash on her arm was really itchy.

There was no doubt she had made a foolish and rash decision.

 

You’ve got it. The word rash means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: rash could mean marks and spots on your skin or, it could mean a thoughtless decision or action.

 

Woman itching her red and sore arm  

 

We need to find a word that fits with the words in the left and right sets of brackets. This word will be a homonym.

(Gift, Treat) (Now, Current)

 

Our choices are: 

a) Soon

b) Today

c) Ready

d) Instant

e) Present

 

The answer is present because it fits with both the word groups and their associated meanings. Present can mean a gift, as well as referring to the current time.


Children opening Christmas presents on sofa         

 

Let’s attempt another question:

Which word matches both sets of meanings in the brackets?

(Moult, Cast off) (Outbuilding, Hut) 

 

Our choices are: 

a) Remove

b) Shed

c) Stable

d) Barn

e) Drop

 

The correct answer is shed as this means to lose hair or skin and, can also be a small structure in the garden.

 

        

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

Are you ready to solve a series of word mysteries, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Lead, Guide) (Behaviour, Manner) 

 

Conductor of orchestra

Project

Portray

Conduct

Convey

Convince

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Comfort, Sympathise) (Device, Equipment)

Console

Soothe

Encourage

Controls

Electronics

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Allow, Authorize) (Licence, Pass) 

 

     Woman holding driving licence out of window of car

Certificate

Document

Voucher

Permission

Permit

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'sentence' is not used as a verb.

 

Robber fleeing scene of crime with sack of stolen goods on his back

We will have to sentence the criminal tonight.

Make sure you sentence him fairly.

I'm not sure that's fair to sentence them if they might be innocent!

He stopped sharply at the end of the sentence.

It was not an easy job to sentence them.

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Aircraft, Aviation) (Level, Flat) 

 

Helicopter

Hovercraft

Glider

Airborne

Plane

How are you getting on with this activity so far, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Credit, Associate with) (Quality, Characteristic)

Allocate

Assign

Input

Attribute

Dismiss

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Opposite, Reverse) (Talk, Discourse) 

 

Relay

Communicate

Impart

Discuss

Converse

What type of word is 'lean' in the sentence below?

 

The athlete admired his lean figure in the mirror.

Adverb

Adjective

Verb

Noun

Preposition

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Argue, Disagree) (Item, Article)

 

Object

Possession

Protest

Complain

Oppose

You've made it to the final challenge, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'doctor' is not used as a noun.

People were nervous about seeing the new doctor.

All the changes had startled the doctor.

She wasn't happy that someone had tampered with the doctor's things.

Appointments with the doctor were always being changed at the last minute.

Nobody had a clue that he was going to doctor the records.

  • Question 1

Are you ready to solve a series of word mysteries, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Lead, Guide) (Behaviour, Manner) 

 

Conductor of orchestra

CORRECT ANSWER
Conduct
EDDIE SAYS
Some tricky words here, word detective. How did you get on? If you think of a music conductor, you should be able to see that s/he is a person who leads and guides musicians in their performance. The noun form of conduct is about the way you behave. You might have heard of someone getting into trouble for poor conduct, for example.
  • Question 2

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Comfort, Sympathise) (Device, Equipment)

CORRECT ANSWER
Console
EDDIE SAYS
Do you or any of your friends have a games console? This is an electronic device that you play games on. 'Console' also has a verb meaning though. If someone is really upset and you try to comfort them, then you console them.
  • Question 3

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Allow, Authorize) (Licence, Pass) 

 

     Woman holding driving licence out of window of car

CORRECT ANSWER
Permit
EDDIE SAYS
Things that you are permitted to do are the things you're allowed to do. Sometimes, you see signs out and about saying that certain things are not permitted in a place, which means something isn't allowed. Look out for them! People have permits for all sorts of things and in some ways, these are linked to the verb definition, as they show that someone is allowed to do something. For example, a parking permit shows someone is allowed to park somewhere.
  • Question 4

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'sentence' is not used as a verb.

 

Robber fleeing scene of crime with sack of stolen goods on his back

CORRECT ANSWER
He stopped sharply at the end of the sentence.
EDDIE SAYS
Almost all of these sentences use 'sentence' as a verb - did you notice that? It's mostly used regarding criminals. When someone is given their punishment for a crime, they are described as being 'sentenced'. The only one where it is not used in this way here is the fourth option, where the man stopped speaking suddenly at the end of his sentence.
  • Question 5

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Aircraft, Aviation) (Level, Flat) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Plane
EDDIE SAYS
I'm sure you are familiar with the word 'plane' used as a shortened version of airplane, but when used as an adjective it means flat. For example, a 2D drawing of a shape can be described as a plane. Flat surfaces might also be described as a plane if they are smooth and even.
  • Question 6

How are you getting on with this activity so far, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Credit, Associate with) (Quality, Characteristic)

CORRECT ANSWER
Attribute
EDDIE SAYS
Wow, there were some hard words in this question, word detective! Remember that if you come across words that are new to you, look them up in a dictionary and then make a note of them so that you can expand your vocabulary. I'm sure you have many great attributes. These are your positive personality traits. What would you say yours are? If you use 'attribute' as a verb, it means that the result of something is due to something else. For example, you might attribute the success of your football team to your goalkeeper if they have saved lots of shots. You may give them the credit and assign the team's success to them.
  • Question 7

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Opposite, Reverse) (Talk, Discourse) 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Converse
EDDIE SAYS
Converse means the opposite. It's often used as an adverb, in the form of conversely. Look out for it when you're reading. The other definition is the root word of 'conversation'. If you converse with someone, you are having a chat with them.
  • Question 8

What type of word is 'lean' in the sentence below?

 

The athlete admired his lean figure in the mirror.

CORRECT ANSWER
Adjective
EDDIE SAYS
You need to work out if the athlete is leaning as he is looking in the mirror, or whether he is admiring his slender figure. In this case, he is realising how slim he is, so 'lean' is being used as an adjective to describe his appearance.
  • Question 9

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Argue, Disagree) (Item, Article)

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Object
EDDIE SAYS
An object is any item you can see. It's a generic word assigned to all sorts of different things. Did you know that it could also be used as a verb? If you object to something, you strongly disagree with it.
  • Question 10

You've made it to the final challenge, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'doctor' is not used as a noun.

CORRECT ANSWER
Nobody had a clue that he was going to doctor the records.
EDDIE SAYS
Look carefully for the sentence where 'doctor' is not referring to a person here. It's the last one, isn't it? To doctor something means to change something, and often something that shouldn't be interfered with. In this case, someone is tampering with the records, which should not be doctored! Well done for completing this activity, super detective - there were some tricky words in here. Terrific work! You are now able to identify if a homonym is used as a verb or noun, within a sentence.
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