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Identify which Homonym Makes Sense in the Sentence

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches all of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Identify which Homonym Makes Sense in the Sentence' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word rash in the two sentences below?

 

The rash on her arm was really itchy.

There was no doubt she had made a foolish and rash decision.

 

You’ve got it. The word rash means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: rash could mean marks and spots on your skin or, it could mean a thoughtless decision or action.

 

Woman itching her arm which is irritated and red  

 

We need to find a word that fits with the words in the left and right sets of brackets. This word will be a homonym.

 

(Gift, Treat) (Now, Current)

 

Our choices are: 

a) Soon

b) Today

c) Ready

d) Instant

e) Present

 

The answer is present because it fits with both the word groups and their associated meanings. Present can mean a gift, as well as referring to the current time.


Two children on sofa opening Christmas presents        

 

Let’s attempt another question:

Which word matches both sets of meanings in the brackets?

(Moult, Cast off) (Outbuilding, Hut) 

 

Our choices are: 

a) Remove

b) Shed

c) Stable

d) Barn

e) Drop

 

The correct answer is shed as this means to lose hair or skin and, can also be a small structure in the garden.

 

        

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

Are you ready to solve another activity mystery, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

(Secure, Guarded) (Locker, Chest) 

 

 

Shield

Safe

Casket

Harmless

Protect

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Region, County) (Condition, Order)

 

 

     

Location

Area

Situation

State

Shape

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Uproar, Rampage) (Spread, Mass)

 

 

     

Protest

Riot

Rage

Collection

Exhibition

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'whistle' is used as a verb.

 

Whistle on red lanyard

 

 

     

Blow your whistle referee!

The shiny new whistle made a shrill and sharp sound.

Whistle as loudly as you can if you get lost.

Please don't blow your whistle in my ear

I've lost my whistle so can I use yours?

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Passage, Section) (Remove, Extricate) 

 

    

Section

Extract

Release

Cutting

Detach

How are you getting on with this activity, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Immediate, Current) (Award, Dispense) 

 

 

     

Modern

Grant

Offer

Instant

Present

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Tradition, Habit) (Trading, Shopping) 

 

     

Custom

Festivities

Purchase

Obtain

Ceremony

What type of word is 'lash' in the sentence below?

 

During the storm, the rain continued to lash against the window for hours.

 

Adverb

Adjective

Verb

Noun

Preposition

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Hesitation, Uncertainty) (Arrangement, Booking)

 

     

Engagement

Hire

Reservation

Doubt

Reluctance

You're on to the final question, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'novel' is used as an adjective.

 

What a fantastic new novel she's written

The novel was long and a little dull

The library was full of novels of all lengths and subjects

It was a novel idea to write a book on such an unusual subject

There are no more novels for sale in the bookshop

  • Question 1

Are you ready to solve another activity mystery, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

(Secure, Guarded) (Locker, Chest) 

 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Safe
EDDIE SAYS
Hopefully, you feel nice and safe right now! Safety is that feeling of being protected and secure where you are. There is also a special kind of locker called a safe. We often see them in hotel rooms. People lock up their valuables in a safe to keep them...safe!
  • Question 2

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Region, County) (Condition, Order)

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
State
EDDIE SAYS
We tend to call regions in the UK counties, but can you think of a country where different regions are called states? One example would be the United States of America. We also use the word 'state' to describe the condition something is in. We sometimes say something "is in a state", if it's in a mess.
  • Question 3

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Uproar, Rampage) (Spread, Mass)

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Riot
EDDIE SAYS
You are most likely to have heard of a riot being a large protest where people object to something, sometimes by being a little violent. Our other meaning is very different. An example could be saying that a flowerbed is a riot of colour. This gives us an image of a bright and vibrant spread of colour. Look this one up if you're unsure, or look out for it when you're doing your own reading.
  • Question 4

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'whistle' is used as a verb.

 

Whistle on red lanyard

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Whistle as loudly as you can if you get lost.
EDDIE SAYS
A whistle is an object that we blow to make a shrill, sharp noise. Some people can also whistle just as loudly themselves, by blowing air through their lips. So when we say people whistle, that is a verb, whereas if you blow a whistle then the word is a noun because we are using an object. This means we can see that our third option is correct because someone is using whistle as a bossy verb (or an imperative).
  • Question 5

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Passage, Section) (Remove, Extricate) 

 

    

CORRECT ANSWER
Extract
EDDIE SAYS
You might sometimes read an extract of a book. This is just a short passage that has been taken from the whole story. We can link this to our second set of brackets too as the verb 'extract' means to take out, just like the section of the book has been taken out of the whole story. Have you or anyone you know ever had a tooth extracted? This is when you have a tooth removed by the dentist.
  • Question 6

How are you getting on with this activity, word detective?

 

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Immediate, Current) (Award, Dispense) 

 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Present
EDDIE SAYS
We call the here and now the present, while the past has already happened, and the future is yet to come! Presently, you are doing your activity, so that's what's happening right now. With a very slight difference in pronunciation, present also means to give something to someone else. Have you ever been presented or awarded for anything? You can see how this definition links to the fact that we call a gift we give to someone else a present.
  • Question 7

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Tradition, Habit) (Trading, Shopping) 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Custom
EDDIE SAYS
Let's take our first set of brackets, to begin with, and think of custom as being a tradition, or something that people do for a certain celebration or at a particular time of year. For example, putting up a Christmas tree in December is a European custom. Our second set of brackets has a strong link to the word customer, which is someone who buys something from someone else. Sometimes in a shop, you might see a sign that says 'Thank you for your custom' which simply means thank you for shopping with us.
  • Question 8

What type of word is 'lash' in the sentence below?

 

During the storm, the rain continued to lash against the window for hours.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
Verb
EDDIE SAYS
When you see the word lash, what's the first thing that pops into your mind? Is it your eyelashes? This is the noun definition of the homonym. Here though, we have the verb form of 'lash' which is a synonym for whips or strikes, so it paints a picture of rain beating against the windows during the storm.
  • Question 9

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Hesitation, Uncertainty) (Arrangement, Booking)

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Reservation
EDDIE SAYS
Have you or your family ever made a reservation at a restaurant? It's when you arrange a booking ahead of time so that they hold a table for you. I expect this is the definition that you're most familiar with. Our first set of brackets refers to people having reservations, or doubts, about something. For example, you might have reservations about going for a day out at the beach in the middle of winter!
  • Question 10

You're on to the final question, homonym hunter!

 

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'novel' is used as an adjective.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
It was a novel idea to write a book on such an unusual subject
EDDIE SAYS
Novels are a type of book, usually quite a long fiction book. However, the adjective novel means new. So here, we can pick out the fourth option, as a novel idea would be a new idea. Excellent work word detective; that's this activity completed! You have developed your skill of recognizing which homonym applies to given sentences.
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