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Find the Missing Homonym in the Sentence

In this worksheet, students will find the word that matches all of its single word definitions, the word will be a homonym. This will build students’ vocabulary and comprehension skills.

'Find the Missing Homonym in the Sentence' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Verbal Reasoning

Curriculum subtopic:   Multiple Meanings

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

What do you notice about the word rash in the two sentences below?

 

The rash on her arm was really itchy.

There was no doubt she had made a foolish and rash decision.

 

You’ve got it. The word rash means something completely different in each sentence!

 

Some words are spelled the same, but have more than one meaning. We call these homonyms.

 

For example: rash could mean marks and spots on your skin or, it could mean a thoughtless decision or action.

 

  

 

We need to find a word that fits with the words in the left and right sets of brackets. This word will be a homonym.

 

(Gift, Treat)   (Now, Current)

 

Our choices are: 

a) Soon

b) Today

c) Ready

d) Instant

e) Present

 

The answer is present because it fits with both the word groups and their associated meanings. Present can mean a gift, as well as referring to the current time.

 


        

 

Let’s attempt another question:

Which word matches both sets of meanings in the brackets?

 

(Moult, Cast off)    (Outbuilding, Hut) 

 

Our choices are: 

a) Remove

b) Shed

c) Stable

d) Barn

e) Drop

 

The correct answer is shed as this means to lose hair or skin and, can also be a small structure in the garden.

 

        

 

In this activity, you will need to be a homonym hunter and match words to their meanings.

 

Pssst! Here’s a handy hint to help you reach superstar status: the word you choose has to match all of the definitions provided.

 

 

Are you ready to begin?

 

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type provided in brackets to guide you.

 

Column A

Column B

Address (noun)
Speak to someone
Address (verb)
To give out
Project (noun)
Collection of work
Project (verb)
Location of a building

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'contract' is used as a verb.

The new player signed his contract.

Frightened animals contract their bodies to hide.

It would be illegal to break the contract.

Contracts are kept in the filing cabinet.

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Prevent, Resist)

(Repetition, Chorus)

Avoid

Verse

Refrain

Deplete

Replicate

Have you realised that you're nearly halfway through already?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'initial' mean?

 

The initial task had seemed easy, but the questions were certainly getting harder now.

They had to write the first letter of their name on the task

Firstly, they had to write two letters on the task

At first the task had seemed easy

The latter part of the task is easier than the first part

Select the two definitions of the word 'plane' from the options below.

 

They had to write the first letter of their name on the task

Firstly, they had to write two letters on the task

At first the task had seemed easy

The latter part of the task is easier than the first part

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Dirty, Unclean)

(Earth, Ground) 

 

     

Muddy

Grimy

Tarnish

Soil

Compost

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'fuse' is used as a verb.

 

The fuse kept the electrical devices safe

The power cut was because the fuse had blown

Replace the fuse and the bulb should work again

You will need to fuse together the wires

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Level, Set)

(Stadium, Ground) 

 

     

Level

Sound

Strike

Pitch

Goal

Select the two definitions of the word 'overlook' from the options below.

Record

Ignore

Supervise

Pay attention

Search for

Watch over

It's your final question already, word detective!

 

To swallow something means you allow food or drink to go down your throat.

 

Select the other definition of the word swallow from the options below. 

 

An insect

An animal

A plant

A bird

A group of people

  • Question 1

Are you ready to begin?

 

Match the homonyms below to their correct definitions.

 

Use the word type provided in brackets to guide you.

 

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Address (noun)
Location of a building
Address (verb)
Speak to someone
Project (noun)
Collection of work
Project (verb)
To give out
EDDIE SAYS
All buildings have an address, which often includes a street name and the number or name of a building on that street. As a verb though, address is a formal way of saying you are speaking to someone. For example, the headteacher might address the whole school during assembly. With the homonym 'project', the noun is more commonly used than the verb. A project as a noun is something that a group of people or individual may work on. As a verb, 'to project' something means to display it. Have you ever seen or used a projector? It gives out light in order to display an image, this helps us to better understand the definition of this word.
  • Question 2

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'contract' is used as a verb.

CORRECT ANSWER
Frightened animals contract their bodies to hide.
EDDIE SAYS
A contract as a noun is a document which sets out the terms, conditions and rules of an agreement. People are given a contract when get a new job or when they buy something to protect the interests of those parties involved. As a verb though, contract means to shrink. So in our example, the frightened animal shrinks in order to hide.
  • Question 3

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Prevent, Resist)

(Repetition, Chorus)

CORRECT ANSWER
Refrain
EDDIE SAYS
This is a tricky one Word Detective. How did you do? Again, we have a verb and a noun here. The verb means to resist or stop yourself from doing something. For example, you might refrain from texting somebody back when you're annoyed. As for the noun, 'refrain' in this sense refers to a repetitive line, section of a poem or song. It's often the catchy bit that you find yourself singing along to!
  • Question 4

Have you realised that you're nearly halfway through already?

 

In this sentence, what does the homonym 'initial' mean?

 

The initial task had seemed easy, but the questions were certainly getting harder now.

CORRECT ANSWER
At first the task had seemed easy
EDDIE SAYS
You're completely right if you're thinking that your initials are the first letters of your name and surname. There is a link to the fact that when we use this word, we are talking about the first of something. We can also use the word 'initially' to mean firstly. So the initial task would be the first task.
  • Question 5

Select the two definitions of the word 'plane' from the options below.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Watch out with that spelling Word Detective! The first list contains a definition for something being plain and bland, but that is a different spelling to the plane we are thinking about. That means from the first list we need to select the flying vehicle. For the second list, we need to select the flat surface. It's a word you might learn about in maths when you talk about shapes.
  • Question 6

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Dirty, Unclean)

(Earth, Ground) 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Soil
EDDIE SAYS
Can spot the soil in the picture? That is the earth and the ground that the second set of brackets refer to. What about the adjective version? If something is soiled, this means it's dirty. I'm sure you can see that makes sense if you've ever ended up covered in soil. You and your clothes need a good wash afterwards don't they?
  • Question 7

Choose the sentence below where the homonym 'fuse' is used as a verb.

 

CORRECT ANSWER
You will need to fuse together the wires
EDDIE SAYS
A fuse is a tiny component in electrical items that is there to keep you safe. If there is a problem with the device, for example, if it overheated, the fuse would cut off the power to stop it causing real damage. This is what sometimes happens when you have a power cut, so an adult checks the fuse box. The word 'fuse' can also be used as a verb. Two things can be fused together, or combined, to become one thing. This can even happen with bones. If they break, as they heal, they fuse back together. Ouch!
  • Question 8

Choose the homonym that fits with the meaning of both sets of words in the brackets below. 

 

(Level, Set)

(Stadium, Ground) 

 

     

CORRECT ANSWER
Pitch
EDDIE SAYS
What do we call a field or arena which is used for sports matches? It's a pitch, isn't it? There is also a verb definition for pitch. For example, a teacher pitches work at the right level for their students. This means they set it at the right level so that the pupils understand and excel. There would be no point in including Year 5 level words in a Year 3 activity, as it would be pitched too high for the Year 3 Word Detectives to build their confidence.
  • Question 9

Select the two definitions of the word 'overlook' from the options below.

CORRECT ANSWER
Ignore
Watch over
EDDIE SAYS
Isn't it strange that this homonym pair almost has opposite meanings? The first meaning of 'overlook', is if you were to skim over something too quickly and not notice the important details. We would say that they have been overlooked. However, the second definition is when you look over something. For example, if you lived in a tall block of flats, you may overlook the gardens of the houses next door. It really does depend on the context in order to understand which meaning is used in different sentences.
  • Question 10

It's your final question already, word detective!

 

To swallow something means you allow food or drink to go down your throat.

 

Select the other definition of the word swallow from the options below. 

 

CORRECT ANSWER
A bird
EDDIE SAYS
This is one of those words you either know or you don't. So don't panic if you struggled. A swallow is a type of bird. I wonder if you've ever seen one? Lookup a picture if you're unsure. Your work here is done Word Detective! Great job.
---- OR ----

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