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Grammar: Active, Interrogative and Imperative Sentences 2

In this worksheet, students practise changing one type of sentence into another.

'Grammar: Active, Interrogative and Imperative Sentences 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:  Assess Effect and Meaning

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Sentences can be active (statements), interrogative (questions) or imperative (orders).

The cat is drinking its milk. (active)

Is the cat drinking its milk? (interrogative)

Drink your milk! (imperative)

 

To convert one type of sentence into another, we need to make changes to the verb and alter the word order.

 

To make a statement into a question the verb is usually moved to the beginning of the sentence. If the verb is made up of more than one word, only the first part of the verb is moved to the beginning of the sentence.

Is the cat drinking its milk?

 

An imperative sentence usually starts with the verb.

Drink your milk!

As the cat is being spoken to, we do not need to include the words 'the cat'. Imperative sentences often end with an exclamation mark, but not always.

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

Are you listening to me?

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

Can you come here?

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

You are doing your homework.

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

You are going to bed.

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Is Henry coming out to play?

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Are we going to France on holiday?

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Can pigs swim?

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

Timmy can play the clarinet.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

Penguins can swim under water.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

The Taj Mahal is in India.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

  • Question 1

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

Are you listening to me?

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

CORRECT ANSWER
Listen to me!
EDDIE SAYS
An imperative sentence is a bossy sentence. So you have to put your bossy hat on! To make this sentence sound bossy we need to change it from sounding like a question. We can do this by bringing the verb 'listen' to the start of the sentence. The sentence 'Listen to me!' is a command, it is bossy.
  • Question 2

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

Can you come here?

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

CORRECT ANSWER
Come here!
EDDIE SAYS
Are you being bossy yet? Remember imperative sentences are commands. The person talking wants something done and they want it done now! Imagine the difference between someone asking, "can you come here?" or someone just shouting "come here!". Which one sounds bossy? Taking away 'can' and starting the sentence with the verb, our question becomes a command.
  • Question 3

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

You are doing your homework.

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

CORRECT ANSWER
Do your homework!
EDDIE SAYS
Keep it up! Here we have an active statement, when the subject of the sentence is doing something. To make it an imperative sentence, remember to make it bossy. Imagine you are telling that person to do something.
  • Question 4

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an imperative sentence (order).

 

You are going to bed.

 

(Remember to start with the verb.)

CORRECT ANSWER
Go to bed!
EDDIE SAYS
Are you enjoying being bossy? Each time you need to imagine that you are telling the subject of the sentence to do something. You are not asking them, you are telling them. Remember bring the verb to the start of the sentence. Keep up the bossiness.
  • Question 5

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Is Henry coming out to play?

CORRECT ANSWER
Henry is coming out to play.
EDDIE SAYS
A bit of a change up! Did you get manage it? To make this an active sentence you need to imagine you are a narrator and explaining to the reader what is happening. You need to change the sentence from a question into a statement. Remember to look back at the introduction where it explains how each sentence changes, if you are stuck.
  • Question 6

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Are we going to France on holiday?

CORRECT ANSWER
We are going to France on holiday.
EDDIE SAYS
Here we have an interrogative sentence, so a question and we needed to change it into an active sentence. Remember the subject of the sentence is doing something. in this case the subjects 'we' are going to France. So we turn it into an active statement by changing the word order. By swapping around the verbs 'are' and 'we' are turn the sentence into a statement. You can do this! keep it up!
  • Question 7

Change the following interrogative sentence (question) into an active sentence (statement).

 

Can pigs swim?

CORRECT ANSWER
Pigs can swim.
EDDIE SAYS
How you doing? Did you manage to change the word order? By swapping 'can' and 'pigs' around, you stop the sentence from being a question and turn it into a statement.
  • Question 8

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

Timmy can play the clarinet.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

CORRECT ANSWER
Can Timmy play the clarinet?
EDDIE SAYS
Right this may seem different, but you are still swapping the word order just the other way round. You can do this! Now you need to turn the sentence into a question. Remember interrogative sentences are the proper way of saying questions. Imagine your a detective, how would you ask this as a question? Changing the order of 'Timmy' and 'can', turns this into an interrogative sentence.
  • Question 9

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

Penguins can swim under water.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

CORRECT ANSWER
Can penguins swim under water?
EDDIE SAYS
Getting the hang of this now? Hopefully you have seen here that you need to change the word order to turn this sentence into a question. Swapping the noun 'penguins' and the verb 'can' around turns this active statement into a question, an interrogative sentence. Nearly there!
  • Question 10

Change the following active sentence (statement) into an interrogative sentence (question).

 

The Taj Mahal is in India.

 

(Remember the question mark!)

CORRECT ANSWER
Is the Taj Mahal in India?
EDDIE SAYS
You got this now! Keep being the detective. When asked to turn a sentence into an interrogative one, you just need to ask yourself "How can I turn this into a question?". Look at the words in the sentence and change the order to make it into a question.
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