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Statement, Question, Order 1

In this worksheet, students practise identifying active, interrogative and imperative forms of sentences.

'Statement, Question, Order 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:  Assess Effect and Meaning

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Sentences can be statements, questions or orders.

Kim is doing the washing up. (statement)

Is Kim doing the washing up? (question)

Do the washing up! (order)

 

These types of sentences are also known as active (statements), interrogative (questions) and imperative (orders).

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Are you coming to my house?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Stop that now!

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

I live in Liverpool.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

I've always loved painting.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Do you take sugar in your tea?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Wait for me!

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't like it when it rains all day.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Please come here now.

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative

 

Can you help me, please?

active

interrogative

imperative

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't understand much French.

active

interrogative

imperative

  • Question 1

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Are you coming to my house?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
EDDIE SAYS
This is a question so it is interrogative. Remember to look at the clues in the question itself, it gives you hints as to which type of sentence you are looking for. We can see this is a question as a question mark has been used at the end of the sentence.
  • Question 2

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Stop that now!

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
EDDIE SAYS
Great effort! When you read this sentence say it out loud and imagine how you would say it. 'Stop that now!' isn't a question its a command. The person is telling them to stop, they aren't asking them. This makes it imperative.
  • Question 3

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

I live in Liverpool.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
EDDIE SAYS
Keep going! This is what we call active. Its something that is happening right now. If you think about the word active, we might think of something that is on or its still going. This works in the same way when we think of a sentence being active, its happening right now.
  • Question 4

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

I've always loved painting.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
EDDIE SAYS
You got the hang of this now? This is active. It is statement. Its not a question or a command. A sentence is active when the subject of the sentence has performed or is performing an action. In this example the subject likes painting. Painting is the action and 'I' represents the person (subject) in the sentence.
  • Question 5

Decide whether the following sentence is active (a statement), interrogative (a question) or imperative (an order).

 

Do you take sugar in your tea?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
EDDIE SAYS
Keep it up rock star! An easy way to decide what type of sentence this might be, is to look for the grammar that has been used. This sentence uses a question mark therefore it must be a question. Question type sentences are known as interrogative. You got this!
  • Question 6

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Wait for me!

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
EDDIE SAYS
The trick again here is to look at the grammar being used. This sentence uses an exclamation mark. Normally this means the sentence should be shouted or said with expression. Generally imperative sentences use exclamation marks, as they are what we call 'bossy' sentences. We imagine the subject being bossy and possibly shouting them. This isn't always the case so it is always good to double check by imagining the way in which you think the sentence would be said.
  • Question 7

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't like it when it rains all day.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
EDDIE SAYS
Nearly there keep it up! Did you look for the grammar? No question or exclamation marks have been used, so this could mean it is active. You can double check by looking at the content. What is the sentence about? You can see it is active because its about the subject and an action. It sounds like a statement. The person does not like it when it rains.
  • Question 8

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

Please come here now.

CORRECT ANSWER
imperative
EDDIE SAYS
A tricky one here as there is not any obvious grammar to give us a clue. Now you need to think about what its being said. Even though the person is saying 'please' they are still giving an order. The subject is not asking the person to come over, they are telling them. So it is imperative.
  • Question 9

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative

 

Can you help me, please?

CORRECT ANSWER
interrogative
EDDIE SAYS
High five for effort! This is interrogative because the speaker is asking for help rather than telling someone to help. Just keep reading it over and thinking about what it actually says.
  • Question 10

Decide whether the following sentence is active, interrogative or imperative.

 

I don't understand much French.

CORRECT ANSWER
active
EDDIE SAYS
Super! You got thing hang of this now? This is active. The subject is telling us about an action, in this example the action is speaking french.
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